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Full text of "Annual report"

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AUG 11 1976 



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SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



G6VERN*' r MT INFORMATION CENTER 
SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY 



REFERENCE BOOK 

Not to be taken from the Library 



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DOCUMENTS DEPARTMENT 



SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1223 90186 3622 



September 15, 1950 



REPORT TO HONORABLE 3LKER E. R03IITS01T, MAYOR 
CITY AITB C0U1TTY OF SAN FRA1TCISC0 



Statement of Activities of the Parking Authority 

City and County of San Francisco 

Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1950, with Additions to Date 



ORGANIZATION 

The Parking Authority of the City and County of San Francisco 
was created on October 13, 19^9, the date on which the Resolution of 
Necessity #9126 became effective, following adoption ^oy the Board of 
Supervisors on October 3» 19^9 f and rpproval by yourself on October 6, 
19^9. The first regular meeting of the Authority was held on October ^l t 
19^9. The General Manager and Secretary to the Authority were appointed 
to their respective positions at this time. 

The Authority budget, subsequently adopted by the Board of 
Supervisors and epproved by yourself, became effective on December 9» 19^9 • 

The Authority offices at 500 Golden Gate Avenue became available 
for temporary occupancy on January 12, 1950, They were completed for 
permanent use on Kay 9, 1950. 

PERIOD OF PRODUCTIVE ACTIVITY 

Inasmuch as the employment of staff personnel, receipt of 
necessary working supplies, equipment and furniture were completed as of 
the second week in February, it is reasonable to report that the Authority 
has been on a functioning basis for a period of seven months as of this date. 



MZiETIITC-S AID CONFERENCES 

Since its creation, the Authority has held 12 regular monthly 
meetings, 21 informal meetings, 3 special meetings and 9 conference 
meetings, a total of ^5 meetings in all. The attendance of the members of 
the Authority and delegated staff members at these meetings and conferences 
has been practically 100fo t In addition, there have been innumerable informal 
interviews, conferences and committee appearances attended by staff members, 
the Chairman and various members of the Authority as occasion demanded. 



3^ 



_ s" - <2- 



Report to Honorable Elmer E. Robinson 
September 15, 1950 - Page #2 



POLICY AiTD PROG-RAM 



The general policies and program of the Authority v/ere determined 
shortly after its organization and are best exemplified by the following 
Declaration of Purposes, Policy and Program for Off-Street Parking Facilities 
dated February 8, 1950 j 

"The Parking Authority of the City and County of San Francisco has 
been created by the "Parking Law of 19^9" of the State of California and for 
the purpose therein set forth. That purpose is the supplying of additional 
off-street parking facilities to reduce serious conditions of congestion of 
street traffic which is obstructing access to and use of both -public and 
private property, increasing traffic hazards, impeding rapid and effective 
fighting of fires and the disposition of police forces and endangering the 
public peace, health and safety, 

"The City and the State have declared that the supplying of addi- 
tional off-street parking facilities and the performance of all undertakings 
incident thereto are public uses and purposes for which public money may be 
spent and private property acquired raid are governmental functions, 

"The Parking Authority has been created as an arm of City government 
with the responsibility of prosecuting the above program. It has been dele- 
gated the powers deemed necessary to accomplish this program, 

"The program of the Authority contemplates the following steps: 

1, Stimulation of private enterprise to finance and construct 
the facilities reouired under the off-street parking -program . 

In the event results are inadequate the Authority will proceed 
to the next step; namely, 

2, Cooperation with private enterprise in securing sites for 
garage construction . 

Such garage sites, purchased by the Authority through 
negotiation or by process of condemnation, will be made 
available on mutually agreeable terms to private parties 
for construction and operation of garages thereon. Again, 
if results are inadequate, the next step will be taken; namely, 

3, Financing and construction of garages, including site 
acquisition, by the Authority itself . 

Private parties will then be invited to submit bids for 
operation of the completed project. In the event satisfactory 
bids are not forthcoming, the Authority will have recourse to, 

k. Operation of the completed facilities . 



Report to Honorable Elmer E, Robinson 
September 15, 1950 - Page #3 

"The Authority wishes to emphasize that it will exercise its 
powers of financing, site acquisition construction and operation only as 
a necessary supplement to the ability of private enterprise to perform, 

"The Authority has begun a study of existing garage capacities and 
parking demand together with all related factors and data necessary to 
establish areas of Primary Off-Street Parking Demand, The Authority will 
avail itself of all resources and facilities obtainable from all City 
departments, City offices and City officials in accomplishing its objectives, 
Following this study, it will propose a Master Plan for Off-Street Parking 
Facilities, Before final adoption, the Plan v/ill be published in tentative 
form for the information and reaction of all interested parties and the public. 
Public hearings v/ill be held, opinions invited and the Plan carefully reviewed 
before its final adoption as a blueprint of locations for public garage 
construction, 

"Following adoption of the Master Plan for Off-Street Parking 
Facilities, the Authority will invite proposals or bids for construction 
of public parking garages in any or all of the locations of Primary Off- 
Street Parking Demand, 

"Upon receipt of satisfactory proposals or bids, the Authority vail 
select the most advantageous and proceed with the construction program, 

"There is presently no basis on which a time schedule for completion 
of the foregoing program can be established. However, it will be the purpose 
of the Authority to: 

1, Assemble and analyse all data available on which to base a 
tentative Master Parking Plan, 

2, Hold public hearings and thereafter adopt a Master Parking 
Plan as the basis for official action, 

3» Receive and consider bids, 

4, Undertake to bring about a completion of approved proposals 
at the earliest possible date consistent with a proper 
consideration of all the foregoing factors and with the 
full realization of the necessity of continuing to give 
prompt attention to ways and means for the solution of our 
parking problems," 

ACCOMPLI SHHEITTS TO DATS 

Information on File on Off-Street Parking : 

Public participation in provision of off-street parking 
facilities is new. The San Francisco Parking Authority, 
together with other parking authorities throughout the 
country, is a pioneer in this field. 



Report to Honorable Elmer E, Robinson 
September 15, 1950 - Page #4 

In the absence of established rules of procedure, it has 
been necessary to seek factual data on off-street parking 
based on the experience and plans of other cities v/hich 
may have application to the San Francisco problem, 

Prom its very inception, the Authority began building an 
information file on off-street parking. This file is 
constantly expanding. To date it embraces an exchange of 
information with 34 principal cities including Baltimore, 
3oston, Chicago, Denver, Des Moines, Detroit, Los Angeles, 
Milwaukee, Minneapolis, Hew York ^ity, Philadelphia, 
Pittsburgh, Seattle, Vancouver, B, C, , and Washington, D, C, 

Studies of Proposed Parking Garage Locations : 

The Authority has made preliminary studies of 25 proposed 
sites for off-street parking facilities; 21 to serve the 
downtown business section and 4 to serve neighborhood 
retail shopping areas. 

The principal ones under consideration at this time are: 

1, St. Mary's Park 

2, Civic Center Plaza 

3, Kearny-Pine-California 

4, Portsmouth Square 

5, Mission Street (Miracle Mile) Area 

6, West Portal Avenue Area 

Studies of Proposed Parking Lot and Garage Projects : 

The Authority has made studies of 7 detailed plans submitted 
for the construction of public parking garages and lots as 
follows: 

1, St, Mary's Park (Underground Garage) #1 

2, St, Mary's Park (Underground Garage) #2 

3, St. Mary's Park (Underground Garage) #3 

4, Civic Center Plaza (Underground Garage) 

5, Kcamy-Pinc-Califori-ia (Surface Garage) 

6, Bartlctt Street (Parking Lot - Mission District) 

7, Wawona Avenue (Parking Lot - West Portal Avenue District) 

Engineering Studies and Reports : 

St. Mary's Square Area : 

An engineering study intended to furnish the basis for 
recommendations for a garage or garages in the St, Mary's 
Square Area has just been completed by the Bureau of 
Engineering of the Department of Public Works of the City 
and County of San Francisco on behalf of the Authority, 
Copies of this report entitled "Report to Parking Authority 
of San Francisco on Proposed Public Garages in Vicinity of 
Saint Mary's Square" are submitted herewith for your 



Report to Honorable Elmer E„ Robinson 
September 15, 1950 - Page #5 

Uncle rground Borings - St. Mary's Square : 

The Authority arranged for additional test "borings 
in St. Mary's Square to further determine the 
feasibility of underground construction in that 
location. 

West Portal Avenue Retail District : 

The Bureau of Engineering of the Department of Public 
Works of the City and County of San Francisco has filed 
a preliminary report on location, cost and potential 
revenues of a parking lot to serve the West Portal 
Avenue shopping district at the request and on behalf 
of the Authority, This matter is under study at this 
time. 

Fringe Parking Report : 

A study to examine the possibilities of the use of 
perimeter parking in San Francisco as a partial 
solution of the parking problem has been made by 
Eric A, Mohr, Municipal Affairs Intern, Coro 
Foundation, San Francisco, with the cooperation 
and on behalf of the Authority, 

Copies of the report are herewith submitted for your 
information. You will observe the conclusion that a 
fringe parking program is not desirable at this time. 

Engineering Studies and Reports -» In Progress 

Civic Center Plaza Underground Garage : 

The Bureau of Engineering, Department of Public Works, 
City and County of San Francisco, is engaged in a 
traffic study of the Civic Center area on behalf of 
the Authority, The study is being made to ascertain 
the potential parking demand for an underground garage 
beneath the Civic Center Plaza, It will assist the 
Authority in arriving at determination as to the 
proper parking capacity and feasibility of a garage 
in that location. The report should be ready by 
October 1, 1950, 

Bartlett Street Parking Lot - Mission District : 

The Bureau of Engineering is preparing a time and cost 
estimate of a study to determine the economic feasibility 
of a parking lot to serve the Mission Street retail 
shopping district. 



Report to Honorable Elmer E c Robinson 
September 15, 1950 - Page #6 



IMMEDIATE PL^TS ATP OBJECTIVES 



In view of the rapid expansion of the war effort, the Authority has 
been increasingly mindful of its mandate to provide additional off-street 
parking facilities in order that traffic congestion endangering the public 
health and safety may be relieved as quickly as possible. The parking of 
automobiles off the city streets will be of material aid in the movement of 
the police, fire fighting equipment and the military in the event of an 
emergency. It will also gre- tly facilitate the movement of war supplies and 
materiel through the port 8 

In consideration of the above facts, the Authority has made every 
effort to speed up its program. Its immediate plans and objectives are as 
follows: 

1, To call for bids for a garage or garages in the St, Mary's 
Square area as quickly as conclusions can be reached on the 
basis of the report of the Bureau of Engineering, just 
received. 

From preliminary negotiations with potential bidders, it 
apxDears that bids to be received may present the following 
alternatives for consideration: 

1, Pull private financing, 

2, Joint private and public financing, 

3, Pull public financing, 

2, Proceed with an engineering study of the proper size and 
economic feasibility of an underground garage beneath 
Civic Center Plaza as the basis for a call for bids for a 
garage in that location, 

3» Proceed with on engineering study of the economic feasibility 
of the proposed Bartlett Street Parking Lot (Mission retail 
shopping district) to be folio v/ed ~oy a call for bids for such 
a facility, 

4, Continue studies of the economic feasibility of the proposed 
Wawona Avenue Parking Lot (West Portal Avenue District) looking 
toward a call for bids as soon as the proper action can be 
determined, 

5, Evaluate additional sites and plans for parking garages and 
parking lots in the congested downtown and other business 
areas of the city for the eo.rliest possible action thereon. 



CURRENT FIHANCnTG AHD CAPITAL PROGRAMS 



Administrative expenses of the Authority end the cost of special 
technical and engineering services, beyond, those available from other depart- 
ments of the City and County without charge, are being met by appropriations 
from the General Fund, Accounting for these funds is made by the regular 
quarterly financial reports of the Authority, 



Report to Honorable Elmer E, Robinson 
September 15, 1950 - Page #7 

The Authority has no capital funds with which to finance its 
program of public improvements. 

The issuance of $5,000,000 general obligation bonds to finance the 
acquisition and construction of off-street parking facilities v/as, however, 
authorized at the election of November, 19^7 < It is assumed that initial 
financing of the Authority's off-street parkin^ program should be made from 
that fund and recommendations to that effect will be made to yourself and 
the Board of Supervisors as the program progresses. 

In connection with, the financing of the off-street parking capital 
program, the Authority wishes to comment on the practice, now quite general 
throughout California and the nation, of utilizing part or all of the net 
revenues from parking meters to assist in the financing of new off-street 
parking facilities. 

The City Attorney lias given an opinion that appropriate laws allow 
the Board of Supervisors to allocate any or all of the net income from parking 
meters in San Francisco to the financing of off-street parking facilities, 

A State Constitutional Amendment giving public bodies the right to 
pledge the future revenue of parking meters as additional security for off- 
street parking facility revenue bonds carried by an overwhelming majority at 
the June, 1950 election. The assumption was implicit in the amendment that 
parking meter funds should be utilized to finance off-street parking facilities. 

The Authority recommends consideration of the utilization of the net 
revenues from parking meters in San Francisco for the purpose of assistance in 
financing San Francisco's off-street parking program in the event additional 
financial support should be found desirable, 

CONCLUSION 

The Authority is deeply appreciative of the assistance, cooperation 
and many courtesies extended by yourself, the members of the Board of 
Supervisors, the Chief Administrative Officer, the Controller, the City 
Attorney, the City Engineer and many other department heads and their staffs 
which have contributed so materially to its progress during this first period 
of organization. 

Respectfully submitted by and on 
behalf of the Parking Authority of 
the City and County of San Francisco, 

Yining T. Fisher, General Manager 



September 15 » 1950 

SUPPLEMENT TO REPORT TO HOhORABLS ELMER E, R03I1TS0N, MAYOR 

CITI AhD OOUtTTY OP SALT FRAITCISCO 

Preparations for Civilian Defense by the Parking Authority 
City and County of San Francisco 

Although the Parking Authority has been engrossed since its 
creation in the manifold details of organization and preparation of the 
groundwork for San Francisco's over-all off-street parking program, it has 
been keenly conscious from the inception of its work of the desirability, if 
not indeed the necessity, of integrating the proposed new system of garages 
with the pattern of civilian defense. 

In the first instance, the provision of additional off-street 
parking space which will free the streets of curb parking, which is a primary 
cause of street traffic congestion, will itself materially assist traffic 
movements essential to civilian defense. 

In the second place, the character of the garages themselves may be 
adapted to military and civilian defense needs in the event of wartime 
emergency conditions^ 

With the latter thought primarily in mind, the Authority has sought 
to determine the feasibility of bomb-proofing new underground garages contem- 
plated in its program, particularly that proposed for the Civic Center Plaza, 

It has conceived, that a large underground garage beneath Civic Center 
Plaza, suitably bomb-proofed or bomb-resistant, would lend itself to certain 
very essential alternate emergency uses in the event of aerial attack upon 
the city, These would be: 

1, An emergency shelter for the civilian population, 

2, An emergency first aid headquarters, 

3, A communications center, 

4, An emergency headquarters for the vo.rious departments of 
civilian government. 

On March 30, 195°» the Authority addressed an inquiry to certain 
public officials and atomic experts requesting an opinion on the feasibility 
and desirability of bomb-proofing the garages contemplated for construction* 



Supplement to Report to 
Honorable Elmer E, Robinson 
September 15, 1950 - Page #2 

Among them were National Secretary of Defense Louis Johnson, Acting Chairman 
Sumner T, Pike of the U, S„ Atomic Energy Commission, Dr. Ernest 0, Lawrence 
of the University of California and San Francisco City Engineer Ralph G. 
Wads worth. 

The questions submitted were: 

1. Can surfaces of underground garages be sufficiently 
reinforced to provide protection against demolition 
bombs, the A bomb and the H bomb? 

2. If so, what should be the character and strength of 
the protective covering? 

3. The probable cost? 

The most pertinent reply came from H, L. Bowman, Acting Chief, 
Civil Defense Liaison Branch, Division Biology and Medicine of the U, S, Atomic 
Energy Commission under date of April 7> 195°» Mr. Bowman said in part: 

"An answer on feasibility must take into account two matters 
of considerable uncertainty: the power of the bomb and the 
distance from the structure to the point of detonation. 
Concerning a bomb of the strength of the Nagasaki bomb, 
detonating at the hei ; ;ht of that bomb, it may be said that 
directly under the bomb a concrete roof 36 inches thick 
v/ould probably permit some radiation sickness to persons 
protected by it, but no deaths. If an equal weight of earth 
is substituted for any concrete that is omitted, this thick- 
ness of the structure may be reduced. The designing engineers, 
of course, would have to make adequate provision for the blast 
effect of the weapon." 

Informal discussions with Admiral Albert G. Cook, Director of 
Civilian Defense of the City and County of S a n Francisco, have resulted in 
the opinion that bomb-proofing of garages would be highly desirable if 
adequate engineering studies confirm it to be structurally and economically 
feasible. The Authority has requested Admiral Cook to secure that information 
for its use, if possible. 

The economic aspects of bomb-proofing new public garages require 
careful consideration. 



Supplement to Report to 
Honorable Elmer E, Robinson 
September 15, 1950 - Page #3 

It appears that any underground garage offers certain protective 
features which will make a substantial contribution to civilian defense. 
That can be accomplished, of course, without additional cost. If special 
design and surface barriers are to be provided, there will be an appreciable 
added expense whi ch cannot be properly charged to the normal use of such 
garages for parking purposes. It is the opinion of the Parking authority 
that if special protective features for civilian defense are to be incorporated 
in the proposed new underground garages, that funds for the purpose must be 
provided by special appropriation by the Federal, State or local government. 

Respectfully submitted by and on 
behalf of the Parking Authority of 
the City and County of San Francisco 



Vining T. Pi she r, General Manager 



IF 
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75 -5- 



Septemher 15, 1952 



REPORT TO H01T0RA3LS ELMER E. R03IHS01T, MAYOR 
CITY AM) COUNTY OF SAIT FRAFCISCO 



Statement of Activities of the Parking Authority 
City and County of San Francisco 
Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1952 



Dear Mayor Robinson: 

The San Francisco Parking Authority respectfully submits 
the following report of its activities for the fiscal year 1951-1952, 

The Authoritj? - renders its financial reports on a quarterly 
basis, and you will therefore find copies of the four quarterly financial 
reports attached for your information. 

Progress of Parkin,?; Program 

The activities of the Parking Authority during the 1951-52 
fiscal year were devoted principally to development of the following projects} 

1, Final accomplishment of St, Mary's Square Garage, 

2, Final accomplishment of the Mission-Bartlett 
Parking Plaza. 

In addition, the Authority was concerned with the following 
important considerations: 

1, The advisability of the establishment of off-street 
parking facilities in the West Portal district, 

2, The advisability of the establishment of off-street 
parking facilities in the North Beach business area, 

3, The preliminary development of off-street parking 
facilities in the Central Market Street area, 

k t The character, capacity and economic feasibility 
of a parking facility for the Civic Center area. 



Report to Honorable Elmer E. Robinson 
September 15, 1952 - Page #2 



St. Mary*s Square Garage 



During the fiscal year 1951-1952, all of the preliminary 
work required in connection with the construction of St, Mary's Square Garage 
was accomplished. This comprised: 

1, Completion of land acquisition, 

2, Completion of the call for "bid documents and their 
approval and authorization of the publication of the 
call for bids by the Recreation and Park Commission 
and the City and County as joint lessors* 

3, National Production Authority project approval. 

4, National Production Authority construction materials 
allocation, 

5» Continued stimulation of potential bidders for the 
financing, construction and operation of the garage. 

With the apparent assurance that all obstacles had been 
removed, the call for bids for the financing, construction and operation of the 
garage was first published on September 26, 1951. The then existing credit 
controls imposed in connection with the National Voluntary Credit Restraint 
Program militated against the submission of bids, and the one otherwise 
satisfactory bid received in response to that call, was of necessity declared 
invalid because of a qualification with respect to approval of the required 
private financing, 

Following the relaxation of credit controls on May 5i 1952, 
the call for bids was re-published on June 21, 1952, Although the date for 
reception of bids falls beyond the period in question, fiscal year 1951-1952, 
it should be noted that three bids were received and the award made to the 
highest responsible bidder, S, E, Onorato, Inc. and W„ & B, Realty Co, The 
lease is now in process of execution. Certain salient facts with respect to 
the project and the lease are set forth below: 

1, Investment of City and Coiuity in additional 
land- $400,000 (approximately), 

2, Estimated construction cost to be met by 
Lessee - $2,100,000, 

3, Total project cost - $2,500,000. 

4, Garage capacity - 325 parking stalls, 
5% Period of lease - 33 years, 

6, Rental - typ of gross receipts, 

7, Guaranteed minimum rental - $1,225 per month, 

8, Estimated completion date - December, 1953* 



Report to Honorable Elmer E, Robinson 
September 15, 1952 - Page #3 



Mission-Bartlett Parking Plaza 



The development of this project embracing land acquisition 
and land clearance for a public parking lot 66,000 square feet in area and of 
a parking capacity of betv/een 200 and 250 automobiles designed to park 1,000 
automobiles per day was brought to substantial completion during the fiscal 
year. 

Land and construction costs will approximate $5Q0,000, 
Financing is from the Parking Bond Fund of 19^7 • 

The legal documents required for lease of the facility for 
private operation have been prepared and approved and authorization granted 
for the publication of the call for bids. Bidders will be required to guarantee 
a rental of $18,000 per year as minimum payment under a percentage lease based 
on gross parking revenues. 

It is planned that the call for bids shall be published 
at an early date, immediately following the completion of land clearance and 
the necessary improvements which are going forward with the cooperation of 
the Real Estate Department and the Department of Public Works. 

West Portal Area 

The question of the necessity for and feasibility of 
providing off-street parking facilities for the West Portal Avenue retail 
shopping area received intensive study and the careful consideration of the 
Authority during the past fiscal year, 

A report by the City Engineer received by the Authority in 
July, 1951 established certain facts which formed the basis for the following 
conclusions: 

1, Land values for parking sites were exhorbitantly 
high in proportion to potential revenues in the 
areas of potential parking demand, 

2, New parking facilities could not be established in 
the district on a cost .and revenue basis that would 
permit them to be financially self-sustaining. 

Subsequent studies made by the Authority itself served only 
to confirm the above facts and conclusions and led finally to the decision 
that the Authority could not recommend the establishment of new parking 
facilities in the West Portal district unless and until a proper and satis- 
factory means of underwriting the potential deficit thereof might be found. 
It is believed that the advisability of allocating parking meter revenues 
for such purposes should be carefully explored, 

North Beach Area 

Following a request of the ITorth Beach Merchants and 
Boosters for a study of the necessity and feasibility of providing additional 



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Report to Honorable Elmer E, Robinson 
Sept enter 15, 1952 - Page #^ 

off-street parking facilities in the retail shopping and restaurant areas 
of the Forth Beach business district, the Authority made a careful analysis 
of the situation. 

As a result of preliminary investigations by the Authority, 
it was concluded that a parking demand study was justified and necessary to 
establish the basic facts upon which a sound conclusion could be based. This 
study was made by the City Engineer on the Authority' s behalf and the report 
submitted in June, 1952. 

The facts presented by the City Engineer formed the basis 
for the following conclusions: 

1» New parking facilities in the retail shopping areas, 
as such, would not be financially self-sustaining, 

2. New parking facilities in the Broadway restaurant 
area would be justified on the basis of potential 
financial returns, 

The Authority has requested that the Director of Property 
make preliminary land appraisals of a proposed site for a parking facility to 
serve the Broadway restaurant area with a view to making a recommendation 
for the official designation of a project site for that purpose. 

Central Market Street Area 

The necessity of additional parking facilities to meet the 
heavy retail and other business parking demand in the Central Market Street 
area has been apparent to the Parking Authority since its inception. The 
progress of the St. Mary's Square Garage and Mission-Bartlett Parking Plaza 
projects during the year made it possible for the Authority to begin the 
preliminary work required for parking projects in this area. 

Arrangements were made with the City Engineer to make a 
thorough parking demand study including site recommendations, recommended 
capacities, estimated land and construction costs, and estimated operating 
revenues and costs for the central downtown area extending along Market Street 
between Pirst Street and Seventh Street and some two to three blocks to the 
north and south thereof. 

The City Engineer's report, dated November, 1951» demon- 
strated the need and economic feasibility for a substantial addition to the 
present parking accommodations in the Central Market Street area. The 
Authority has seven garage sites in that area under consideration at this 
time. They are adjacent to three centers of primary parking demand at 
l) Third and Market, 2) Pifth and Market, and 3) North of Market generally 
between Stockton and Mason, 

The Director of Property has been requested to make 
preliminary land appraisals of the properties that compose the sites under 
consideration. When these have been received, the Authority will be in a 
position to evaluate the relative merits of these sites from a parking and 
economic standpoint as the basis for specific project recommendations. It 
is hoped this may be accomplished in the very near future. 



Report to Honorable Elner E, Robinson 
September 15, 1952 - Page #5 



Civic Center Area 



The economic feasibility of providing additional parking 
facilities in the Civic Center area adjacent to the City Hall has been a 
matter of primary concern to the Authority, 

Earlier studies made on its behalf by Ramp Buildings 
Corporation demonstrated to the Authority that an underground garage beneath 
Civic Center Plaza would: 

1, 3e feasible from an engineering standpoint, 

2, Meet a large unsatisfied parking demand provided 
rate schedules were held to an acceptable moderate 
parking fee. 

The economic studies accompanying the corporation's report 
indicated, however, the probability of an extended interim period before the 
garage under consideration could become economically at tractive as a private 
financial venture. 

The Authority then asked Ramp Buildings Corporation to 
prepare an alternate plan of a smaller garage with a view to determining if 
such revision might result in a project of greater financial feasibility. The 
revised plan and accompanying economic report was received in August, 1952 and 
is under study and consideration by the Authority at this time, 1!he capacities, 
estimated construction cost and potential revenues are as follows: 

1, Capacity - 1,00^ parking stalls (customer self- parking), 

2, Levels - 5 

3, Ploor Area - 361,900 square feet 

4, Construction Cost - $3,258,300 

5, Earnings before financial charges - 3*5^$ of 
capital cost (self parking basis). 

As a purely interim and temporary addition to parking 
facilities in the Civic Center area, the Authority has recommended the 
establishment of a public parking lot at the site of the old Commerce High 
School Athletic Field until such time as it may be devoted to some permanent 
use, 

Sw;,g;estions 

Inasmuch as it appears that it may be desirable to establish 
parking facilities for public convenience in areas of low economic parking 
demand, or before the full development of such demand, such as the Civic 
Center area and certain secondary retail areas, the Parking authority believes 
the time has come that definite consideration should be given to the 



Report to Honora"ble Elmer 3. Robinson 
September 15, 1952 - Page #6 

utilization of the net revenues from parking neters in San Francisco for the 
purpose of assistance in financing San Francisco's off-street parking program* 
Furthermore, the pledge of the meter revenues can substantially reduce revenue 
"bond interest rates should such financing he deemed desirable for future 
parking projects. 

The Authority also believes that existing parking facilities 
constructed prior to its establishment, such as the Marshall Square parking 
lot and Union Square Garage, should be placed under its jurisdiction and 
the revenues therefrom credited to this agency. 

We wish to take this opportunity to acknowledge and 
express our appreciation for the splendid cooperation and assistance of 
yourself, the City Attorney, Controller, Chief Administrative Officer, 
Director of Property, Director of Public Works, City Engineer, and others 
who have contributed so substantially to the accomplishments of the Parking 
Authority during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Albert H, Jacobs 
Chai rman 

AH J: he 
Encs. 



THE PARKING AUTHORITY of the 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

1 _____ 



GEORGE CHRISTOPHER. MAYOR 



536 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE • SAN FRANCISCO 2, CALIFORNIA • PROSPECT 6-1565 



September 11, 1959 



MEMBERS: 

ALBERT E. SCHLE8INGER 
CHAIRMAN 

JAY E. JELLICK 
JOHN E. SULLIVAN 
DAVID THOMSON 
JOHN B. WOOSTER 

• • 
VINING T. FISHER 

OKNERAL MANAGER 

THOMAS J. O'TOOLE 
UCRKTARV 



Report to Honorable George Christopher, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 

Statement of Activities of the Parking Authority 
City and County of San Francisco 
Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1959 



DG€U^l^Tb 
MAY 20 19B5 



SAN FRANCISCO 
PJUBLIf- L»P»A«*- 



Dear Mayor Christopher; 

The report of the San Francisco Parking Authority for the fiscal year 
1958-59 » together with supplemental information you have requested, is herewith 
respectfully submitted. 

The financial report is set forth in the attached copies of the 
Authority's four quarterly financial reports. 

The major accomplishments and activities of the Authority for the past 
year are shown below. These have been classified according to the Authority's 
four-point policy and program adopted March 8, 1950. 



Policy Point 



Stimulation of and cooperation with private 
enterprise to finance and construct the 
facilities required under the off-street 
parking progranu 



New Parking Facilities 
Reported Completed and Placed in Operation 
since July 1. 1958 

Nino Geraldi 

Powell, Mason, Jefferson and Beale Streets 

Larry Barrett, Inc. 

Pine and Kearny Streets 

Howard Rowebottom 

Brannan and 2nd Streets 

Howard Rowebottom 

Sacramento Street and The Embarcadero 

V, Atikian 

5th and Howard Streets 

Self park System 

Main and Howard Streets 



400 parking stalls 
33 parking stalls 
19 parking stalls 
1? parking stalls 
30 parking stalls 
30 parking stalls 



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Honorable George Christopher 
Page #2 
September 11, 1959 



California Parking Corporation 
Clementina and Beale Streets 

Howard Rowebottom 

1st and Brannan Streets 

Barrett Garages, Inc. 

Mission and 6th Streets 

Howard Jerome Edelstein 

Spear, Howard and Folsom Streets 

Oxford Hotel Parking 

Mason and Turk Streets 

S. E. Onorato Co. 

Mission and 3rd Streets 

Roc Ross 

Main and Howard Streets 

**th and Berry Corporation 

Self park System 

Southern Pacific Lot 

Selfpark System 

Stevenson and Jessie Streets at Fifth 

Montgomery Center Auto Park 



These additions brought the total of new 
off-street parking spaces provided under 
this phase of the Authority's program 
since October 6, 19^9 to 

Under Development 

Construction since June 30, or continuing 
at this time amounts to: 

Pine -Front Auto Park 

Crown Zellerbach Building 

John Hancock Insurance Co. 

Bethlehem Steel Corporation 

550 California Street 

Park-U-Self (Howard & Folsom Streets) 

Park-U-Self (Davis Street north of Broadway) 



75 parking stalls 
100 parking stalls 
250 parking stalls 

20 parking stalls 

68 parking stalls 
100 parking stalls 

25 parking stalls 

325 parking stalls 
150 parking stalls 

32 parking stalls 

125 parking stalls 
1»799 parking stalls 

8,798 parking stalls 



70 parking 
150 parking 

55 parking 
300 parking 
300 parking 
200 parking 

6*> parking 



stalls 
stalls 
stalls 
stalls 
stalls 
stalls 
stalls 



1,140 parking stalls 



Honorable George Christopher 
Page #3 
September 11, 1959 



The number of new off-street parking spaces 

that have been completed or have been placed 

under construction under this phase of the 

Authority's program from October 6, 19^9 to 

date total 9»936 parking stalls 

1,200 of the foregoing number of parking 
stalls were public projects, from which 
the Authority and the City withdrew when 
private industry evidenced its ability 
and willingness to proceed. These were: 

Fifth and Howard Parking Plaza 300 parking stalls 

EIlis-O^Farrell Garage 900 parking stalls 

1,200 parking stalls 

180 of the foregoing number of parking stalls 
were established on sites originally selected 
and designated by the Authority from which it 
withdrew because of the prior urgency of other 
projects. These were: 

Minna-Natoma Parking Lot 80 parking stalls 

Jones-Golden Gate Parking Lot 100 parking stalls 

180 parking stalls 

Policy Point #2 . Public Cooperation with private enterprise to 

provide off-street parking by public provision 
of garage sites and private provision of the 
construction financing . 

The following four major downtown parking projects were 
advanced toward accomplishment during the past year under 
this policy category. 

In each case operation will be by a non-profit corporation 
with any profit accruing to the City and County of San 
Francisco, 

Fifth and Mission Garage 

This project was completed and dedicated August 27, 1958 under an 
agreement between the City of San Francisco Downtown Parking Corporation, a 
non-profit organization of businessmen and property owners, and the City and 
County of San Francisco. Under agreement, the Authority acted as agent for 
the City and County in all negotiations. 









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Honorable George Christopher 
Page #Jf 
September 11, 1959 

Basic physical and financial project data are as follows: 

Location : Southeast corner of Fifth and Mission Streets, 

within one block of San Francisco's $100,000,000 
a year retail block, Market Street between Fourth 
Street and Fifth Street, 

Capacity : 1,083 parking stalls. 

Land Cost : $1,600,000 (approximate) 
(public) 

Building Cost : $1,500,000 
(private) 

Total Construction Costs : $2,135,000 
(private) 

Construction : Open type reinforced concrete. 

Operation : Customer self-parking. 

Parking Rates : 15# an hour; $1.25 maximum 2k hours; 

$17.50 month; $15.00 month night fleet rate. 

The garage was financed and built by the Wm. J. Moran Company. It 
is being operated by S, E. Onarato, Incorporated. 

It provides customer self -parking on four roomy levels with a total 
capacity of 1,083 parking stalls. It is operated on a non-profit basis at 
low parking rates intended to provide a necessary public service and attract 
continuing patronage to the City's most substantial business area. 

During its first ten months the operating figures show: 

Number of automobiles parked 607,393 

Gross Revenues $313,120.^2 

On the basis of these figures it is apparent the number of automobiles 
parked during the first year will exceed the engineer's estimates by 40$. The 
revenues are already substantially greater than those previously estimated by 
1970. 

On August 20 a passenger elevator service was added. 

Two additional upper parking floors are contemplated for constructioi 
next year. 



Honorable George Christopher 

Page #5 

September 11, 1959 

Sutter-Stockton Garage 

This project is being built under an agreement between the City of 
San Francisco Uptown Parking Corporation, a non-profit corporation, and the 
City and County. The Parking Authority is acting as agent for the City and 
County in this matter. Operation will be by System Auto Parks and Garages, 
Inc. acting for the operating lessee, the Corporation. 

Basic particulars of this project are: 

Location : 55 » 385 square feet of land extending east from 
Stockton Street in the block bounded by Sutter, 
Stockton, Bush Streets and Grant Avenue. 

Capacity : 932 parking stalls 

Land Cost : $2,550,000 
( public ) 

Construction Cost : $3,680,000 
( private ) 

Construction : Open type reinforced concrete 

Operation : Customer self -parking 

Parking Rates : 1 hour 25^5 20# an hour thereafter. 
Major points of progress during the year on this project were: 

Completion of land acquisition: June 2, 1959 

Completion of site clearance: September 7, 1959 

Start of construction: September 7» 1959 

Completion is estimated for October, I960. 
Civic Center Underground Garage 
Basic facts pertaining to this project are: 

Location : The subsurface of the north half of Civic Center Plaza. 

Capacity : Self-parking 95^ stalls 

Attendant=parking 1,461 stalls 

Land Cost : None. Property City-owned 

Construction Cost : $4,500,000 

Construction : Reinforced concrete. Three underground levels. 



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Honorable George Christopher 
Page #6 
September 11, 1959 

Operation ; Customer self-parking. Parking, sales and services. 

The City has a contract with the City of San Francisco C ivic Plaza 
Parking Corporation to finance and construct this garage. The City will be 
the operating lessee for the first 10 years, the Corporation for the period 
subsequent thereto and prior to full debt retirement. Operation will be by 
System Auto Parks and Garages, Inc. 

Progress on this project during the year was as follows: 

Construction began on December 10, 1958. 

As of this date completion of construction is estimated 
for January 1, I960, 

Portsmouth Square Underground Garage 

There has been a continuing high degree of interest in this project 
during the past year. Several different groups had shown strong interest and 
had been assisted in every possible way by the Authority to obtain the necessary 
engineering and financial information required by them in their financing. 

However, on August 11, 1959 Portsmouth Civic Parking Corporation 
filed a letter of intent to finance and construct this facility and submitted 
the legal documents for review and approval on August 20, 1959 • These are 
presently under review and recommendations based thereon may be expected at 
an early date. 

Under this proposal the physical and financial characteristics of 
the project will be as follows: 

Location : The subsurface of Portsmouth Plaza, fronting on 

Kearny Street between Washington and Clay Streets. 

Capacity : Self-parking - 500 stalls 

Attendant-Parking - 800 stalls 

Size : Three underground levels and mezzanine 

Land cost : None, Property City-owned 

Estimated Construction Cost : $3,000,000 

Operation : Self-parking 

Proposed Rate Schedule : To be determined. 

It is estimated construction can start in December, 1959 and be 
completed within twelve to fourteen months thereafter. 



Honorable George Christopher 

Page #7 

September 11, 1959 

The foregoing new off-street parking projects completed or under 
development jointly by the Authority, the City and private business during 
the past year may be summarized as follows! 

Fifth and Mission Garage 1,083 parking stalls 

Sutter-Stockton Garage 932 parking stalls 

Civic Center Underground Garage l,46l parking stalls 

Portsmouth Square Underground Garage 800 parking stalls 

4,276 parking stalls 

When all are completed, these projects added to those previously 
completed and in operation under this method, will make a total of 6.813 
new off-street parking spaces in San Francisco provided, since its establish - 
ment, under the Parking Authority's policy of public-private financing and 
operation . 

Policy Point #3 . Direct public financing and construction. ....... 

Including site acquisition, where private 
construction was not or could not be undertaken . 

No construction under this category was undertaken during this 
past fiscal year except the provision of 8,500 special event 
parking stalls at Candlestick Park which is noted below in 
more detail. Past construction under this category consists 
of: 

Mission-Bartlett Parking Plaza 250 parking stalls 
Lakeside Village Parking Plaza 49 parking stalls 
7th and Harrison Parking Plaza 354 parking stalls 

653 parking stalls 

Policy Point #4 . Operation of completed facilities , (if required) 

Neither during the past year, nor at any time, has it been 
found necessary to resort to public operation of parking 
facilities provided under the San Francisco parking program. 
In all cases, operation has been entrusted to private lessees. 

Accomplishments to date under the foregoing program may be summarized 
as follows: 

1. Private Financing 

1) Completed: 

a) 1958-59 1,799 parking stalls 

b) 1949-58 6.997 parking stalls 

c) Total 8,796 parking stalls 



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Honorable George Christopher 
Page #8 
September 11, 1959 



11 ) Under Development: 

a) Construction begun 1958-59 

b) Other stages of development 

c) Total 

111) Total Under #1 
2. Public-Private Financing 
l) Completed: 

a) 1958-59 

b) 19*19-58 

c) Total 

11) Under Development: 

a) 1958-59 

b) Other 

c) Total 

111) Total Under #2 
3» Public Financing 
1) Completed: 

a) 1958-59 

b) 19^9-58 

c) Total 

4, GRAND TOTAL 

5» Itemized Grand Total, completed or under 



1,140 parking stalls 



1,140 parking stalls 
9,936 parking stalls 



1,083 parking stalls 
3.620 parking stalls 
4,703 parking stalls 



3,193 parking stalls 



3,193 

7,896 parking stalls 



653 parking stalls 
653 parking stalls 

18,485 parking stalls 

immediate development : 



1) Completed, all methods: 

a) 1958-59 

b) 1949-58 

c ) Total 

11) Under Development, all methods: 

a) 1958-59 

b) Other 

c) Total 

111) GRAND TOTAL, all methods 



2,882 parking stalls 
11.270 parking stalls 
14,152 parking stalls 



4,333 parking stalls 

4,333 parking stalls 

18,485 parking stalls 



Honorable George Christopher 
Page #9 
September 11, 1959 

The actual and projected total cost of this program is approximately 
$35,000,000, of which, under the Parking Authority's program and policy, only 
about $5,000,000 required public financing; roughly only about 1$ of the total. 

Neighborhood District Parking 

The past year witnessed an active and continuing campaign on the 
part of the Authority to establish a parking program for the neighborhood 
district retail shopping districts. 

Originally, the districts had requested a total of 3»920 parking 
stalls at an estimated cost of $8,120,000. 

The Parking Authority, the Board of Supervisors and your Administration 
recognized the strong claim for parking relief manifested by the districts and 
a mutual decision was reached on the necessity of two basic steps toward its 
solution. These were: 

• 1, The institution of an increased parking meter rate for the purpose 
of securing additional funds for the continuance of the off-street 
parking program . Consequently the meter rates were increased from 
50 for kQ minutes to 5$ for 20 minutes in the ^0-minute parking 
limit zones and from 5# for 60 minutes to 5$ for thirty minutes 
in the 60-minute parking limit zones. Provision was made for the 
use of pennies and dimes, as well as nickels. The new rates 
became effective in February, 1959 and the required mechanical 
changes will be fully completed in November of this year. The 
legislation provided that: "All revenues in excess of $938,000 
received during any fiscal year shall be transferred to a special 
fund to be known as the 'Off -Street Parking Fund'." Gross 
collections under the new rates have so far represented an 
average increase of approximately 5*$ over the above base figure. 

2, The assignment of top priority to the financing of the neighborhood 
district parking program from the newly established Off-Street 
Parking Fund . 

In order that this program might be fully implemented with all 
necessary supporting information, a supplemental appropriation in the amount 
of $10,000 was approved by yourself and the Board of Supervisors to defray the 
cost of a comprehensive engineering study by the City Engineer, This study 
will be completed this month and is to include the following for the k% 
neighborhood retail shopping districts of the City. 

Estimates of unsatisfied parking demand. 

Recommended new parking capacities. 

Recommended general new parking locations. 

Estimates of land cost for recommended new parking facilities. 



Honorable George Christopher 
Page #10 
September 11, 1959 

Estimates of construction cost for recommended new parking 
facilities. 

Recommended parking rates and operating methods for such 
facilities. 

Estimated gross revenues. 

Estimated Operating costs. 

Estimated new operating income. 

In the formulation of the final program, the Parking Authority will 
be guided in making its recommendations by an evaluation of all of the factors 
involved. 

New Special Event Parking 

During the year the Parking Authority has acted as advisor to the 
Recreation and Park Commission and the City in the development of operating 
plans and the operating lease for the 8,500-car parking area to serve the 
new baseball stadium at Candlestick Park. 

Comparative Results to Date 

From the foregoing, it is shown that 18,485 new off-street parking 
spaces will have been completed since October, 19^9 under the Authority program 
by the close of I960. This new construction represents approximately two times 
the total amount of off-street parking existing in the downtown San Francisco 
business area ten years ago. The De Leuw, Cather study reported 9,388 off-street 
parking spaces in the Central Parking District in 1948. 

The net effect of the new parking construction resulted in an inventory 
furnished by the City Engineer of 19,141 off-street parking spaces in the San 
Francisco Downtown Business District as of June 23, 1959* This inventory may 
be expected to increase to 20,000 spaces in i960. The actual increase of off- 
street parking space as of the end of the 1958-1959 fiscal year was 103$, which 
was accomplished during a period that San Francisco automobile registrations were 
increasing only 26$, from 246,976 (1948) to 313,377 (1958). Nevertheless, the 
wide gap representing excess of parking demand over supply is expected to remain 
for the foreseeable future and indicates a pressing need for more off-street 
parking in the downtown, as well as the neighborhood, districts. 

The Future Parking Program 

On June 25, 1959 » in an interim report, the Authority advised you of 
the new downtown parking space requirements as of the year I960. Making due 
allowance for the balance between increasing production and increasing demand, 
those estimates are presented here unchanged. 












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Honorable George Christopher 
Page #11 
September 11, 1959 



Additional Downtown Parking 
Space Requirements 
(as of the year I960) 



Short- time parking 
All-day parking 
Total 



11,119 parking stalls 
22,238 parking stalls 
33*357 parking stalls 



A Downtown Liaison Parking Committee composed of representatives of 
the Building Owners and Managers Association, Down Town Association, San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce and the San Francisco Real Estate Board has 
been set up to advise on ways and means of expanding and financing the 
downtown parking program. 

Parking Automobiles t the Ma.ior Objective 

Although the public parking program is only at its inception with the 
2,999 parking spaces provided at Civic Center Autc Park, Fifth and Mission 
Parking, Marshall. Square Auto Park, Mission-Bar tie tt Parking Plaza, St. Mary's 
Square Garage, Lakeside Village Parking Plaza, Forest Hill Parking Plaza and 
Seventh and Harrison Parking Plaza, a very extensive parking service has 
already been extended to the motorists of San Francisco and the Bay Area, 
witness the following report of service rendered: 



Calendar 

Year 
12£=2L. 

913(53) 
96,801(54) 



Automobiles 
Parked; 

Civic Center 
Auto Park 
opened 12/18/53 

Fifth & Mission 
Parking 
opened 8/28/58 

Marshall Square 
Auto Park 
opened 9/16/58 



Mission-Bartlett 92 , 483 ( 53 ) 
Parking Plaza 238,852(54) 
opened 7/30/53 



Calendar 

Year 
3-955-56 



Calendar 
Year 

i??7-5S 



101,433(55) 128,317(57) 
113,025(56) 121,040(58) 



Calendar 

Year 
1/1-7/1/59 



55,404 



252,899(58) 354,494 



16,552(58) 29,776 



Calendar 

fear 

Totals 



616,933 



607,393 



46,328 



212,813(55) 194,569(57) 
208,715(56) 185,175(58) 



St» Mary's Square 



Garage 



opened 5/12/54 

Lakeside Village 
Parking Plaza 
opened 9/27/56 



115,205(54)* 



281,118(55) 
292,29^(56) 



12,000(56) 



336,360(57) 
384, 661 (5^) 



57,500b7) 
57,500(58) 



90,458 1,223,065 



195,049 1,604,639 



28,750 



155,750** 



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Honorable George Christopher 
Page #12 
September 11, 1959 



Automobiles 
Parked: 

Forest Hill 
Parking Plaza 
opened July, 1957 

7th & Harrison 
Parking Plaza 
opened April, 1958. 



Calendar 
Year 

122r5i- 



Calendar 

Year 
1955-56 



Total Automobiles 
Parked 



Calendar Calendar 
Year Year 



11,475(57) 
22,950(58) 



11,475 



14,669(58) 15,834 



♦Garage has no record of autos parked for May and June, 1954. 
♦♦Estimated, as no actual count taken of this facility, 

RECAPs 



Calendar 

Year 

Totals 



45,900^ 



30,503 



1.221.400 1.783.667 781.240 4.330.561 



Calendar 


Calendar 


Calendar 


Calendar 


Calendar 


Year 


Ye r 


Year 


Year 


Year 


l?^-^4 


1955-56 


1957-58 


1/-7/1/59 


Totals 



Automobiles Parked 

all projects 

1953-54 544,254 

Automobiles Parked 
all projects 
1955-56 

Automobiles Praked 
all projects 
1957-58 

Automobiles Parked 
all projects 
1959 (to 7/1/59) 

Total Automobiles Parked 
all projects 



1,221,400 



1,783,667 



781,240 



4,330,561 









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Honorable George Christopher 
Page #13 
September 11, 1959 



The Parking Bond Fund Financial Report 

For your additional information, we show: 

1, Revenues from public parking projects? 

Civic Center Auto Park 1958-59 Total 

Income Received $43,432.62 $211, 314. 82 
Taxes Received ( 1959-60) 1,914.22 

Taxes Received Total 11.024.26 

$45,346.84 $222,339.08 

Mission-Bartlett Parking Plaza 

Income Received $23,135.78 $126,116.34 

Taxes Received (1959-60) 48.33 

Taxes Received Total 512.51 

$23,184.11 $126,628.85 

St. Mary's Square Garage 

Income Received $26,673.19 $120,633.67 

Taxes Received (1959-60) 38,224.94 

Taxes Received Total 158.396.30 

$64,898.13 $279,029.97 

Lakeside Village Parking Plaza 

Income Received $ 1,980.00 $ 5,445.00 

Taxes Received (1959-60) 

Taxes Received Total - - - 



$ 1,980.00 $ 5,445.00 

7th & Harrison Parking Plaza 

Income Received $ 9,264.49 $ 12,442.77 

Taxes Received (1959-60) 

Taxes Received Total 



$ 9,264.49 $ 12,442.77 

Forest Hill Parking Plaza 

Income Received $ 804.00 1,608.00 

Taxes Received (1959-60) 

Total Taxes Received - - - 



$ 804.00 $ 1,608.00 

*Alameda-York Parking Plaza 

Income Received $ 9,953.23 $13,858.95 

Taxes Received (1959-60) 

Taxes Received Total 



$ 9,953.23 $13,858.95 















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Honorable George Christopher 
Page #14 
September 11, 1959 



1. Revenues from Public Parking Projects (contd. ): 

Marshall Square Parking Plaza 1958-59 Total 

Income Received $ 20,853.19 $ 20,853.19 

Taxes Received (1959-60 ) 

Taxes Received Total - - - - 



$ 20,853.19 $ 20,853.19 

GRAND TOTAL 

Income Received $136,096.50 $512,272.74 

Taxes Received (1959-60) 40,187.^ 

Taxes Received Total 169. 933.07 

$176,283.99 $682,205.81 

*This is a temporary installation of 300 parking spaces at 
Seals Stadium for the Giants' baseball games furnished 
through the courtesy of Hamm Brewing Company. It will be 
discontinued upon the opening of the new baseball stadium 
at Candlestick Park. 

The foregoing income has been deposited in the General Fund insofar as 
tax amounts and tax reimbursements are concerned. The balance of $138,668.53 
has been deposited in the Parking Bond Fund. 

2. Present status of Parking Bond Fund: 

Appropriated $5,229,384.59 

Original Bond Fund 5.000.000.00 

Deposited to Account $ 229,384.59 

Air Rights - St. Mary's Square Garage 99.890.00 

$ 129,494.59 

Unappropriated 9.173.94 

Rentals $ 128,668.53 

Expenditures as of 6/30/59 $5,222,560.98 

Encumbered 6, 625.16 

Unencumbered 6.19 

Total Allotted to date $5,229,192.33 

Reserve - - - - - 

Unalloted balanoe of appropriation 192.26 

Total appropriated $5,229,384.59 

Balance Sheet 

Gross Income from all Projects (6/30/59) 

Rent $136,096.50 

Taxes 40,187.49 

Other sources 117.856.62 $294,140.61 

Costs and Expenses 

Tax Roll Deduction $104,234.00 

Parking Authority Current Operating 42,660.00 

Parking Authority Supp. Approp. 10.198.00 $ 157.092.00 

Net Income $137,048.61 



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Honorable George Christopher 
Page #15 
September 11, 1959 

Acknowledgement 

The Parking Authority wishes to express its appreciation and to 
acknowledge the cooperation and assistance of yourself, the members of the 
Board of Supervisors, the City Attorney, Controller, Chief Administrative 
Officer, Director of Property, Director of Public Works, Director of Planning, 
City Engineer, the private garage industry, the public spirited citizens 
compromising the corporations sponsoring many major projects, and others who 
have given so generously of their time and contributed so greatly to the 
advancement of its program during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

For the Parking Authority of the 
City and County of San Francisco 



By 



^^/T^l/^^^ 




'ining T # Fisher 
General Manager 



VTF:he 

Encs. 



MEMBERS: 



_ _ ~ _ , . . ^ .-^..^-s.-^v, r , JOHN E. SULLIVAN 

THE PARKING AUTHORITY of thi 



16 CHAIRMAN 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

GEORGE CHRISTOPHER. MAYOR 



536 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE - SAN FRANCISCO 2. CALIFORNIA - PROSPECT 6-1565 

September 12, I960 



JAY E. JELLICK 
G. BALTZER PETERSON 
DAVID THOMSON 
JOHN B. WOOSTER 

• • 
VINING T. FISHER 
GENERAL MANAGER 

THOMAS J. O'TOOLE 
SECRETARY 



Report to Honorable George Christopher, Mayor jyj^y ?0 1 

City and County of San Francisco 



SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC Li'-'IP' 



Statement of Activities of the lurking Authority 
City and County of San Francisco 
Fiscal Year Ending June 30, I960 

Dear Mayor Christopher: 

The report of the San Francisco Parking Aithority for the fiscal year 
1959-60, together with supplemental information you have requested, is herewith 
respectfully submitted* 

The financial report is set forth in the attached copies of the 
Authority's four quarterly financial reports. 

The major accomplishments and activities of the Authority for the past 
year are shown below* These have been classified according to the Authority's 
four-point policy and program adopted March 8, 1950* 

Policy Point No. 1 * Stimulation of and cooperation with private 

enterprise to finance and construct the 
facilities required under the off-street 
parking program . 

New Parking Facilities 

Reported Completed and Placed in Operation 

since July 1. 1959 

Howard Street, between Third and Fourth 

Streets (parking lot) 
Hilton Hotel Site (parking lot) 
Jack Tar Hotel (garage) 
Zellerbach Building (garage) 
John Hancock Building (garage) 
Bethlehem Steel Building (garage) 
Cahill Construction Company Building (garage) 
terk-U-Self, Howard and Folson Streets 

(parking lot) 
Fark-U-Self, Davis Street (parking lot) 
Selfpark System, 11 Broadway (parking lot) 
1299 Franklin Street (parking lot) 
33 Tehama Street (parking lot) 
Shipley Street between Uth and 5th Streets 

(parking lot) 



300 stalls 


385 


ir 


Uoo 


it 


175 


11 


55 


fi 


287 


ti 


175 


it 


200 


it 


65 


it 


120 


it 


72 


it 


32 


it 


110 


11 



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Honorable George Christopher 

Page 2 

September 12, I960 



8th and Stevenson Streets (parking lot) 
Folsom Street between Main and Spear Streets 

(parking lot) 
719-727 Howard Street (parking lot) 
13th and Bryant Streets (parking lot) 
11th, 13th and Bryant Streets (parking lot) 
Natoma and 2nd Streets (parking lot) 
Grace Street between Mission and Howard Streets 

(parking lot) 
South ftirk and 2nd Streets (parking lot) 
Davis Street at Broadway (parking lot) 
Main Street between Howard and Folsom Streets 

(parking lot) 
Van Ness Avenue and Turk Street (parking lot) 
Vallejo Street and Emery Lane (parking lot) 
Montgomery and Washington Streets (parking lot) 
2729 Van Ness Avenue (parking lot) 
631 Sacramento Street (parking lot) 
155 Sacramento Street (parking lot) 



These additions brought the total of new 
off-street parking spaces provided under 
this phase of the Authority* s program 
since October 6, 19h9 to 



120 


stalls 


83 


t! 


20 


II 


27 


II 


\6 


tl 


87 


It 


50 


II 


25 


It 


32 


II 


105 


II 


15 


ti 


15 


ti 


8U 


11 


25 


11 


50 


it 


63 


it 


3,222 


stalls 



12,020 parking stalls 



Policy Point No. 2. 



Public cooperation with private enterprise to 
provide off -street parking by public provision 
of garage sites and private provision of the 
construction financing , 

The following four major downtown parking projects have been 
completed under this policy category. 

In each case, operation is or will be by a non-profit corporation 
with any profit accruing to the City and County of San Francisco, 

Fifth and Mission Garage 

This project was completed and dedicated August 27, 1958 under an 
agreement between the City of San Francisco Downtown irking Corporation, a 
non-profit organization of businessmen and property owners, and the City and 
County of San Francisco, Under agreement, the Authority acted as agent for 
the City and County in all negotiations. 



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Honorable George Christopher 

Page 3 

September 12, i960 

Basic physical and financial project data are as follows: 

Location : Southeast corner of Fifth and Mission Streets, 

within one block of San Francisco ! s $100,000,000 
a year retail block, Market Street between Fourth 
and Fifth Streets. 

Capacity ; 1,083 parking stalls 

Land Cost: $1,600,000 (approximate) 
(public) 

Building Cost : $1,500,000 
(private) 

Total Construction Costs : $2,135,000 
(private) 

Construction : Open type reinforced concrete 

Operation : Customer self -parking 

Parking Rates : 15j^ an hour; $1.25 maximum 2h hours j 

$17.50 month; $15.00 month night fleet rate 

The garage was financed and built by the Wm. J. Moran Company. It 
is being operated by S. E. Onorato, Incorporated. 

It provides customer self-parking on four roomy levels with a total 
capacity of 1,083 parking stalls. It is operated on a non-profit basis at 
low parking rates intended to provide necessary public service and attract 
continuing patronage to the City's most substantial business area. 

During the past fiscal year the operating figures show: 

Number of automobiles parked 810,81*6 

Gross Revenues $1*26,226.65 

On the basis of these figures, the gross revenues for the year exceeded 
the engineer's estimates for the year 1970 by 27%, 

The question of adding additional parking floors is under study at 
this time. 

Civic Center Plaza Garage 

Basic facts pertaining to this project are: 

Location : The subsurface of the north half of Civic Center Plaza 

Capacity : Self -parking - 95U stalls 

Attendant-parking - l,U6l stalls 



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Honorable George Christopher 

Jfege U 

September 12, i960 

Land Cost : Wone. Property City-owned 

Construction Cost : $^,500,000 

Construction : Reinforced concrete, Ihree underground levels. 

Operation : Customer self -parking. Parking, sales and services. 

The City had a contract with the City of San Francisco Civic Plaza 
Parking Corporation to finance and construct this garage. The City will be 
the operating lessee for the first 10 years, the Corporation for the period 
subsequent thereto and prior to full debt retirement. Operation is by System 
Auto Parks and Garages, Inc. 

The garage was opened for business March 1, I960. Business for the 
first four months has been as follows: 

Number of automobiles parked 50,282 

Gross Revenues $U0,002.l8 

It should be noted that the operating efficiency and success of this 
project cannot be evaluated until the Plaza surface restoration is completed, 
adequate advertising signs can be installed, and important area improvements 
completed, such as construction of the new Federal Office Building. In the 
meantime, the Authority is exerting every effort to coordinate and accomplish 
the introduction of a program of interim operating improvements, 

Sutter-Stockton Garage 

This project is being built under an agreement between the City of 
San Francisco Uptown Parking Corporation, a non-profit corporation, and the 
City and County. The Parking Authority is acting as agent for the City and 
County in this matter. Operation will be by System Auto Parks and Garages, 
Inc. acting for the operating lessee, the Corporation. 

Basic particulars of this project are: 

Location : 55>385 square feet of land extending east from 
Stockton Street in the block bounded by Sutter, 
Stockton, Bush Streets and Grant Avenue. 

Capacity : 932 parking stalls 

Land Cost : $2,550,000 
(public) 

Construction Cost : $3,680,000 
(private) 

Construction : Open type reinforced concrete 



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Honorable George Christopher 

Page 5 

September 12, I960 

Operation ; Customer self -parking 

Parking Rates : 1 hour 25^5 20fi an hour thereafter 

The garage will be 75# complete by November 15, I960 and the official 
opening has been set for that date, 

Portsmouth Square Underground Garage 

On August 11, 1959, Portsmouth Civic Parking Corporation filed a letter 
of intent to finance and construct this facility and submitted the legal documents 
for review and approval on August 20, 1959. This offer was accepted and will 
become effective upon a favorable outcome of the litigation now pending. Already 
favorable decisions have been given by the Superior and Appellate Courts. 

Under this proposal, the physical and financial characteristics of 
the project will be as follows: 

Location : The subsurface of Portsmouth Plaza, fronting on 

Kearny Street between Washington and Clay Streets. 

Capacity : Self-parking - 500 stalls 

Attendant-parking - 800 stalls 

Size: Three underground levels and mezzanine. 

Land cost : None, Property City-owned, 

Estimated Construction Cost : $3,000,000 

Operation : Self -parking 

Proposed Rate Schedule : To be determined. 

Construction can start immediately after the termination of litigation 
and can be completed within twelve to fourteen months thereafter. 

The foregoing new off-street parking projects completed or under 
development jointly by the Authority, the City and private business may be 
summarized as follows: 

Fifth and Mission Garage 1,083 parking stalls 

Sutter-Stockton Garage 932 parking stalls 

Civic Center Plaza Garage l,U6l parking stalls 

Portsmouth Square Underground Garage 800 parking stalls 

U,276 parking stalls 

When all are completed, these projects added to those previously 
completed and in operation under this method will make a total of 6.813 new 
off-street parking spaces in San Francisco provided, since Its establishment, 
under the Parking Authority's policy of public-private financing and operation . 






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Honorable George Christopher 

Page 6 

September 12, I960 

Policy Point Mo. 3 . Direct public financing and construction...... 

including site acquisition, where private 
construction was not or could not be undertaken . 

No construction under this category was undertaken during this 
past fiscal year. 

The 8,500 special event parking stalls at Candlestick Park are 
considered a special case and are not carried as an increment 
of the general parking program. 

Past construction then under this category consists of: 

Mission-Bartlett Parking Plaza 250 parking stalls 
Lakeside Village Parking Plaza k9 parking stalls 
7th and Harrison Parking Plaza 35Jt parking stalls 

653 parking stalls 

Policy Point Mo. h . Operation of completed facilities , (if required) 

Neither during the past year, nor at any time, has it been 
found necessary to resort to public operation of parking 
facilities provided under the San Francisco parking program. 
In all cases, operation has been entrusted to private lessees. 

Accomplishments to date under the foregoing program may be summarized 
as follows: 

1« Private Financing 

l) Completed: 

a) 1959-60 3,222 parking stalls 

a) 1919-59 8,798 parking stalls 

c) Total 12,020 parking stalls 

11) Total Under No. 1 12,020 parking stalls 

2. Public-Private Financing 

1) Completed: 

a) 1959-60 l,U6l parking stalls 

b) 191*9-59 U.703 parking stalls 

c) Total 6,16U parking stalls 

11) Under Development: 

a) 1959-60 1,732 parking stalls 

111) Total Under No. 2 7,896 parking stalls 









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Honorable George Christopher 

Page 7 

September 12, I960 

3. Public Financing 
l) Completed i 

a) 1959-60 parking stalls 

b) 19U9-59 653 parking stalls 

c) Total 653 parking stalls 

U. GRAM) TOTAL 20,569 parking stalls 

The actual and projected total cost of this program is approximately 
$36,000,000, of which, under the Parking Authority's program and policy, only 
about $5,000,000 required public financing; roughly only about lk% of the total. 

Neighborhood District Parking 

The past year witnessed continuation of the campaign on the part of 
the Authority to establish a parking program for the neighborhood district 
retail shopping districts* 

Originally, the districts had requested a total of 3,920 parking 
stalls at an estimated cost of $8,120,000, These estimates were reduced to 
the following amounts in the City Engineer's report issued in September, 1959: 

Summary of Recommendations t 

Number of neighborhoods to be served 2U 

Number of parking lots to be installed 55 

Number of parking spaces to be provided 2,080 

Estimated project cost $7,000,000 

Estimated annual maintenance cost $ 76,650 

Estimated annual revenue $ 10i*,000 

On March 31, I960, the Parking Authority again modified the program 
in the interest of efficiency and economy. The neighborhood program now under 
development provides for k9 parking lots, comprising 1,1*59 parking stalls, 
located in 21 neighborhood shopping districts. 

This is considered sufficient to meet the neighborhood shopping district 
parking need for the next 10 years. 

Estimated costs are: Project $U,912,500 

Annual Maintenance $ 59,300 

Annual Revenue $ 72,950 

The bulk of the cost is planned to be met from surplus parking meter 
revenues provided by the January 1, 1959 increase in curb parking meter rates. 



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Honorable George Christopher 

Page 8 

September 12, I960 

Comparative Results to Date 

From the foregoing, it is shown that 20,569 new off-street parking 
spaces will have been completed since October, 19U9 under the Authority program 
by the close of I960, This new construction represents more than two times the 
total amount of off-street parking existing in the downtown San Francisco business 
area ten years ago. The De Leuw, Cather study reported 9,388 off-street parking 
spaces in the Central Parking District in 19U8. Nevertheless, the wide gap 
representing excess of parking demand over supply is expected to remain for the 
foreseeable future and indicates a pressing need for more off-street parking in 
the downtown, as well as the neighborhood districts. 

The Future Parking Program 

On June 25, 1959, in an interim report, the Authority advised you of 
the new downtown parking space requirements as of the year I960. Making due 
allowance for the balance between increasing production and increasing demand, 
those estimates are presented here unchanged. 

Additional Downtown Parking 
Space Requirements 
(as of the year I960) 

Short-time parking 11,119 parking stalls 

All-day parking 22,238 parking stalls 

Total 33,357 parking stalls 

A Downtown Liaison Parking Committee composed of representatives of 
the Building Owners and Managers Association, Down Town Association, San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce and the San Francisco Real Estate Board has 
been set up to advise on ways and means of expanding and financing the 
downtown parking program. 

Golden Gateway 

The next new major downtown public parking development will be the 
1,300-car garage planned by the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency for the 
Golden Gateway. The Parking Authority has been cooperating closely with the 
Redevelopment Agency on this project during the past year at the Agency f s request. 

Western Addition 

The Parking Authority is also engaged with the Redevelopment Agency in the 
development of a 500-car underground public parking garage to be constructed in 
connection with the Japanese Cultural Center in the Western Addition. This facility 
is intended to serve the Fillmore Street Shopping District, as well as the Cultural 
Center and thus become an integral part of the City's Neighborhood Parking Program. 



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Honorable George Christopher 

Page 9 

September 12, I960 



City Ownership 

Both of the foregoing garages are to be deeded to the City and County of 
San Francisco by the developers and will be operated under City jurisdiction, rates 
and operating controls. 

Mew ferking Goals for 1961 

As noted above and previously in this report, the immediate new parking 
goals for 1961 under the Jferking Authority program are as follows: 



1, Construction of Portsmouth Square 
Underground Garage 

2, Land acquisition and construction of 
Neighborhood Shopping District Parking 
Program 

3, Construction of Golden Gateway 
Garage No. 1 

h» Construction of Japanese Cultural 
Center Underground Garage 

Total New Parking Capacity 



800 parking stalls 

1,1*59 parking stalls 

1,300 parking stalls 

500 parking stalls 
U,059 parking stalls 



Parking Automobiles, the Major Objective 

Although the public parking program will be only at its inception with 
the 5*381* parking spaces provided at Civic Center Plaza Garage, Civic Center Puto 
Park, Fifth and Mission Garage, Sutter-Stockton Garage, Marshall Square Auto Park, 
Miss ion-Bart lett Parking Plaza, St. Mary ! s Square Garage, Lakeside Village Forking 
Plaza, Forest Hill Parking Plaza and Seventh and Harrison Parking Plaza, a very 
extensive parking service has already been extended to the motorists of San Francisco 
and the Bay Area, witness the following report of service rendered: 





Calendar 


Calendar 


Calendar 


Calendar 


Calendar 


Automobiles 
Parked 


Year 
1953-51* 


Year 
l?^-56 


Year 

1957-58 


Year 

1959-6/30/60 


Year 

Totals 


Civic Center 
Plaza Garage 
opened 3/l/60 








50,282(60) 


50,282 


Civic Center 
Auto ftirk 
opened 12/18/53 


913(53) 
96,801(51*) 


101,1*33(55) 
113,025(56) 


128,317(57) 
121,01*0(58) 


110,1*03(59) 
61,700(60) 


733,632 


Fifth & Mission 
Parking 
opened 8/28/58 






252,899(58) 


768,857(59) 
396,1*83(60) 


1,1*18,239 



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Honorable George Christopher 
Page 10 
September 12, i960 



Automobiles 
Parked 

Marshall Square 
Auto Park 
opened 9/16/58 

M i s s i on-Bart lett 
Parking Plaza 
opened 7/30/53 

St. Mary*s Square 

Garage 

opened 5/12/5U 

Lakeside Village 
Parking Plaza 
opened 9/27/56 

Forest Hill 
Parking Plaza 
opened July, 1957 

7th & Harrison 
Parking Plaza 
opened April, 1958 



Calendar 

Year 
1953-51* 



Calendar 
Year 



Calendar Calendar 

Year Year 

1957-58 1959-6/30/60 



16,552(58) 



61,299(59) 
33,239(60) 



92,1*83(53) 212,813(55) 19fc,569(57) 192,309(59) 
238,852(510 208,715(56) 185,175(58) 87,199(60) 



281,118(55) 336,360(57) 39l*,630(59) 
115,205(5U)* 292,296(56) 381*,66l(58) 181*,376(60) 



12,000(56) 



57,500(57) 
57,500(58) 



11,1*75(57) 
22,950(58) 



ll*,669(58) 



57,500(59) 
28,750(60) 



22,950(59) 
11,1*75(60) 



1*2,81*3(59) 
22,01*7(60) 



Total Automobiles 

Parked 51*1*. 251* 

RECAP: 



1.221,1*00 1.783.667 2.526.31*2 



Automobiles Parked 

all projects 

1953-5U 51*1*.251* 

Automobiles Parked 

all projects 1955-56 1.221.1*00 

Automobiles Parked 
all projects 1957-58 

Automobiles Parked 

all projects 1959-6/30/60 

Total Automobiles Parked all projects 



1.783.667 



2.526.31*2 



*Garage has no record of autos parked for May and June, 195U. 
**Estimated, as no actual count taken of this facility. 



Calendar 

Year 

Totals 



111,090 



1,1*12,115 



1,988,61*6 



213,250** 



68,850** 



79,559 



6.075.663 



6.075.663 



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Honorable George Christopher 
Page 11 
September 12, I960 

In addition, the parking at Candlestick Park special event parking area 
was as follows: 

Automobiles parked 210,1*92 

Buses parked 2,973 

Season parking 351* 

The Parking Bond Fund Financial Report 

For your additional information, we show: 

1, Revenues from public parking projects: 

Civic Center Auto Park 19^9*60 Total 

Income Received $1*6, U3 1*. 03 $257,71*8.85 
Taxes Received (1960-61) 1,31*5.37 

Taxes Received Total 12,369.63 

$1*7,779.1*0 $270,118.1*8 

Miss ion-Bart lett Parking Plaza 

Income Received $2l*,883.80 $151,000.11* 

Taxes Received (1960-61) 275.00 

Taxes Received Total _____ 787.51 

$25,155.80 $151,787.65 

St. Mary ! s Square Garage 

Income Received $27,91*2.21 $11*8,575.88 

Taxes Received (1960-61) 33,310.58 

Taxes Received Total __ 191,706.88 

$61,252.79 $31*0,282.76 

Lakeside Village Parking Plaza 

Income Received $ 1,980.00 $ 7,1*25.00 

Taxes Received (1960-61) 

Taxes Received Total ______ — "* " " 

$ 1,980.00 $ 7,1*25.00 

7th & Harrison Parking Plaza 
Income Received $ 7,02 ». 21* $ 19, 1*61*. 01 

Taxes Received (1960-61) 

Taxes Received Total _ _— _ — 

$ 7,021.21* $ 19, 1*61*. 01 

Forest Hill Parking Plaza 

Income Received * $ 80l*.00 $ 2,1*12.00 

Taxes Received (1960-61) 

Taxes Received Total " " " — 

$ 801*. 00 $ 2,1*12.00 



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Honorable George Christopher 
Page 12 
September 12, I960 



1, Revenues from public parking projects (contd.) : 



■KAlameda-York Parking Plaza 
Income Received 
Taxes Received (1960-61) 
Taxes Received Total 



Marshall Square Parking Plaza 
Income Received 
Taxes Received (1960-61) 
Taxes Received Total 



GRAWD TOTAL 

Income Received 

Taxes Received (1960-61) 

Taxes Received Total 



1960-61 Total 

$ It, 789.59 $ lo76Hc\5i4 



$ M89.59 $ 18,61*8.51; 
$31,079.75 $ 5l,932.9ii 



$31,079.75 $ 51,932.9U 



$liili,93U.62 $657,207.36 
3U,930.95 

_^_ 2011,8611.02 

$179,865.57 $862,071.38 



In addition, the following experience is noted from Candlestick 
Park, the proceeds of which are paid to the Trustee for the San 
Francisco Stadium, Inc. to be used for the retirement of the 
debt. Of this amount, $50,000 is retained by the City and 
County of San Francisco for structural maintenance and repair 
of the Stadium. 



Candlestick Park 
Income Received 
Taxes Received (1960-61) 
Taxes Received Total 



1960-61 Total to 6/30/60 

$185,355.U8 $185,355.U8 

1,132.60 

_„__ 1.132.60 

$186,1*88.08 $186,1*88.08 



An estension of these figures for the full season would 
anticipate a total income of $3U9,172. This represents 
an increase of 20$ over the Parking Authority* s original 
estimates of $291,800 per year. 

In the case of Fifth and Mission Garage and Civic Center Plaza 
Garage, under the contract and rent payable to the City annually 
is an amount equal to 100$ of the net income after the payment of 
operating costs and debt service charges. 

•M-This was a temporary installation of 300 parking spaces at Seals 
Stadium for the Giants* baseball games furnished through the 
courtesy of Hamm Brewing Company. It was discontinued upon the 
opening of the new baseball stadium at Candlestick Park. 

The foregoing income has been deposited in the General Fund insofar as 
tax amounts and tax reimbursements are concerned. The balance of $166,267.78 has 
been deposited in the Parking Bond Fund. 



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Honorable George Christopher 

Page 13 

September 12, I960 

2. Present status of Parking Bond Fund: 

Appropriated $5> 230,1*38 .1*1 

Original Bond Rind $.000,000.00 

Deposited to Account $ 230,1*38.1*1 

Air Rights - St. Mary»s Square Garage 99 \ 890.00 

$ 130,51*8.1*1 

Unappropriated 3g.719.37 

Rentals $ 166,267.78 

Expenditures as of June 30, I960 $5, 230, 1*38. 1*1 

Encumbered -«..«.-- 

Unencumbered — - - — 

Total Allotted to date $5,230,1*38.1*1 

Reserve ------ 

Unallotted balance of appropriation 

Total appropriated $5,230,1*38.1*1 

Balance Sheet 

Gross Income from all Projects (June 30, I960) 

Rent $ li*i*,93iu62 

Taxes 3l*,930.9£ 

Other sources 2.518.09 

$ lo^Sfc.oo 

Costs and Expenses 

Tax Roll Deduction $10l*,23U.OO 

fttrking Aithority current 
Operating 1*2 , 256 ,00 

Parking Authority supple- 
mental appropriation 900.00 $ 11*7.390.00 

Wet Income $ 31*, 993. 66 

Your attention is also directed to the net income allocated to 

the "Off-Street Parking Fund" from the surplus parking meter 
revenues from January 1, 1959 to June 30, I960. This amounts 
to $53l*,l*50.07. 

Full Financial Summary 

The financial magnitude of San Francisco's present municipal parking 

program is shown in the following record of gross income to the City and County 

for the fiscal year July, 1959-June, I960 from revenues, rents and taxes from 






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Honorable George Christopher 
Page li* 
September 12, I960 

the combined City-owned parking facilities: 

Source Amount 

12,000 Parking Meters $1,1*01,912 

9 Forking Lots and Garages*- 289,31i7 

1 Special Events Parking 186, 1*88 

(Candlestick Park) 

$ l r 877 t 7U7 

^Revenues from non-profit operations of Fifth and Mission and 
Civic Center Garages not included. 

Information and Consultation Services 

San Francisco's pre-eminent position and success in the emerging field 
of municipal parking is bringing it national, even international, recognition and 
attention. This has led to a steadily increasing number of inquiries and personal 
visits from other cities and public officials during the past year, to which the 
Authority staff and members have responded insofar as personnel and time limitations 
have permitted. 

In addition a steadily increasing function of the Parking Authority has 
been the extension of parking information to local business associations, 
institutions, and neighborhood groups who have need of such limited advice as 
the Authority can provide on such matters. 

Acknowledgement 

The Parking Authority wishes to express its appreciation and to 
acknowledge the cooperation and assistance of yourself, the members of the 
Board of Supervisors, the City Attorney, Controller, Chief Administrative 
Officer, Director of Property, Director of Public Works, Director of Planning, 
City Engineer, the private garage industry, the public-spirited citizens 
comprising the corporations sponsoring many major projects, and others who 
have given so generously of their time and contributed so greatly to the 
advancement of its program during the past year. 



Respectfully submitted, 

For the Parking Authority of the 
City and County of San Francisco 






By 

Vining T. Fisher 
General Manager 



VTFthe 

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ANNUAL REPORT TO HONORABLE GEORGE CHRISTOPHER, MAYOR 



BY THE 



PARKING AUTHORITY 

OF THE 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1961 
^5- 




JOHN E. SULLIVAN, Chairman 
JAY E. JELLICK, Member G. BALTZER PETERSON, Member 

DONALD MAGNIN, Member DAVID THOMSON, Member 

VINING T. FISHER, General Manager 
THOMAS J. O'TOOLE, Secretary 

OCT ;., 






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536 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE — PROSPECT 6-1565 
SAN FRANCISCO 2, CALIFORNIA 



OF THE CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



GEORGE CHRISTOPHER, Mayor 



Highlights of San Francisco Parking Authority 
Annual Report to the Mayor 
for 
Fiscal Year ending June 30, 1961 



1. San Francisco's ten publicly-owned parking facilities established to 
date under the Parking Authority program have parked the following 
number of automobiles as indicated: 



Calendar Year 1960: 

First six months of 
Calendar Year 1961: 

Since Establishment: 



1, 894,908 Automobiles 

1,136,843 Automobiles 
8,231,863 Automobiles 



2. The City and County of San Francisco has received the following income 
in rent and taxes from these parking facilities: 

Fiscal Year 1960-1961: $163,456.05 

Total Since Establishment: Si, 025 ,527.43 

3. The financial magnitude of San Francisco's municipal parking program, 
including 12,347 parking meters, Union Sguare Garage and Candlestick 
Park Parking Plaza, as well as the ten garages and parking lots noted 
above, is shown by the gross income therefrom of $1,953,427.38 for the 
fiscal year July 1, 1960, to June 30, 1961 . 

4. Since 1949 under the Parking Authority program 18,631 new off-street 
parking stalls have been built in San Francisco. 

Another 4 , 486 are under construction or development at this time. 

The Grand Total of 23,017 parking stalls will have been constructed 
since 1949 when present development is completed . 

5. The actual and projected total cost of this program is approximately 
$52 million which will have been accomplished by the expenditure of 
only |9 million of public funds ; 17% of the total 

6. The following number of new parking stalls were constructed in San 
Francisco during the fiscal year July 1, 1960, to June 30, 1961: 

Lots Garages Stalls 



By Private Enterprise 

By Public-Private Cooperation - 
City-owned 



14 



1,241 

932' 



14 



2,173 



*Sutter-Stockton Garage 



-2- 

7. Forthcoming major parking projects in San Francisco: 

Under Construction 

(1) Fifth and Mission Garage Expansion 500 stalls 

(2) Portsmouth Square Underground Garage 800 stalls 

1,300 stalls 

Under Development 

(1) Japanese Cultural Center Garage 85*+ stalls 

(2) Golden Gateway Garage 1,326 stalls 

(3) Neighborhood Parking Program 1 ,006 stalls 

3,166 stalls 

8 • Parking Authority Balance Sheet - Year ending June 30, 1961 : 

(1) Gross Income to City $163,460.08 

(2) Costs and Expenses* Sl49.173.72 
Net Income $ 14,286.36 

♦Includes $104,234 in lieu taxes. 
Includes $ 42,838 Authority Operating Budget. 



E 



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THE PARK! N. G AUTHORITY of the 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



GEORGE CHRI8TOPHKK. Mayor 



536 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE - SAN FRANCISCO 2, CALIFORNIA - PROSPECT 6-1565 



September 12, 1961 



Report to Honorable George Christopher, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 

Statement of Activities of the Parking Authority 
City and County of San Francisco 
Fiscal Year ending June 30, 1961 



MEMBERS- 
JOHN E. SULLIVAN 
CHAIRMAN 

JAY E. JELLICK 
DONALD MAGNIN 
Q. 3ALTZER PETER90N 
DAVID THOMSON 



VINING T. FISHER 

GENERAL MANA.CER 
THOMAS J. O'TOOLE 
SECRETARY 



Dear Mayor Christopher: 

The report of the San Francisco Parking Authority for the fiscal 
year 1960-61, together with supplemental information you have requested, is 
herewith respectfully submitted. 

The financial report is set forth in attached copies of the 
Authority's four quarterly financial reports. 

The major accomplishments and activities of the Authority for 
the past year are shown below. These have been classified according to 
the Authority's four-point policy and program adopted March B, 1950. 



Policy Point IMo. 1 : 



Stimulation of and cooperation with private 
enterprise to finance and construct the 
facilities required under the off-street 
parking program 



New Parking Facilities 

Reported Completed and Placed in Operation 

since July 1, 1960 

500 Post Street (Barrett Garage) 
1 South Van (Mess Avenue (garage) 
B0 Ellis Street (garage) 

Steuart Street between Mission and Market (parking lot) 

Howard Street between Embarcadero and Steuart (parking lot) 

Howard and Steuart Street (parking lot) 

760 Howard Street (parking lot) 

730 Howard Street (parking lot) 

Howard at Fourth Street (parking lot) 

California and Jones Street (parking lot) 

Mission and Beale Street (parking lot) 

Battery and Washington Streets (parking lot) 



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Honorable George Christopher 
September 12, 1961 
Page 2 



530 Clay Street (parking lot) 

*+75 Bryant Street (parking lot) 

Battery and Jackson Street (parking lot) 

Main and Folsom Street (parking lot) 

Greenwich and Sansorne Street (parking lot) 



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1,2<+1 stalls 



These additions brought the total of new off-street 

parking spaces provided under this phase of the 

Authority's program since October 6, 19^+9, to 13,261 stalls 

Policy Point Mo. 2 : Public cooperation with private enterprise 

to provide off-street parking by public 
provision of garage sites and private 
provision of the construction financing 

The following major downtown parking project was completed 
under this policy category. 

The operation is by a non-profit corporation with any profit 
accruing to the City and County of San Francisco. 

5UTTER-ST0CKT0IM GARAGE 

This project was built under an agreement between the City of San 
Francisco Uptown Parking Corporation, a non-profit corporation, and the 
City and County. The Parking Authority acted as agent for the City and 
County in this matter. Operation is by System Auto Parks and Garages, 
Inc., acting for the operating lessee, the Corporation. The garage 
opened for business on November 15, 1960. 

Basic particulars of this project are: 

Location : 55,385 square feet of land extending east 

from Stockton Street in the block bounded 
by Sutter, Stockton, Bush Streets and 
Grant Avenue 

Capacity : 932 parking stalls 

Land Cost : $2,550,000 

(public) 

Construction Cost : S3, 680, 000 
(private) 

Construction : Open-type reinforced concrete 

Operation : Customer self-parking 

Parking Rates : 1 hour 25£; each additional hour 25£; maximum 

$2.00 for 12 hours; ^30.00 a month 



Honorable George Christopher 
September 12, 1961 
Page 3 

Previous Construction in this Category 

The following garages had been previously financed and built as 
cooperative projects between City and private business: 

Total 
Date Stall Land Construction Project 
Name Completed Capacity Cost Cost Cost 

St. Mary's Sq. Garage 5/12/5*4 B2B S<+00,000 $2, 100, 000- $2,500,00f 

2,300,000 2,700,00f 

Fifth & Mission Garage 8/28/58 1,083 Si, 600, 000 $2, 135,000 13,735,00, 

Civic Center Plaza Garage 3/1/60 1,<*61 -0- $^,500,000 $U , 500,001 

Under Construction in this Category 

The following garage construction is in progress or under develop- 
ment in this category: 

PORTSMOUTH SQUARE UNDERGROUND GARAGE 

On August 11, 1959, Portsmouth Civic Parking Corporation filed a 
letter of intent to finance and construct this facility and submitted the 
legal documents for review and approval on August 20, 1959. Construction 
began on November 15, 1960. 

Under this proposal, the physical and financial characteristics 
of the project will be as follows: 

Location : The sub-surface of Portsmouth Plaza, 

fronting on Kearny Street between 
Washington and Clay Streets 

Capacity : Self-parking - 500 stalls 

Attendant-parking - 800 stalls 

Size : Three underground levels and mezzanine 

Land Cost : None. Property City-owned 

Estimated Construction Cost : S3, 000, 000 

Operation : Self-parking 

Proposed Rate Schedule : 35U per hour 

Construction is scheduled for completion in Oune, 1962. 















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Honorable George Christopher 
September 12, 1961 
Page U 

FIFTH AMD MISSION GARAGE EXPANSION 

Additional Parking Area: 200,000 sq. ft. (2 lev/els) 

Total Parking Area: 600,000 sq. ft. (6 levels) 

Additional Parking Stalls: 500 

Total Parking Stalls: 1,583 

Additional Project Cost: $1,000,000 

Total Construction Cost: 33,135,000 

Scheduled Completion Date: November 15, 1961 

Contractor: Cahill Construction Co. 

Engineers: Gould & Degenkolb 

Operator: City of San Francisco Downtown 

Parking Corporation 

Management: S. E. Onorato, Inc. 

Operation: Self-parking 

Parking Rates: 15£ per hour; Si. 25 maximum 2k hours; 

$17.50 a month; $15.00 monthly night 
fleet rate 

JAPANESE CULTURAL CENTER UNDERGROUND GARAGE 

This project is under joint development by the City of San 
Francisco Western Addition Parking Corporation, the San Francisco Redevelop- 
ment Agency and the Parking Authority subject to official approval of the 
City. Construction is expected to begin in 1961 subject to such approval. 

Present estimates indicate the following physical and financial 
facts of this project: 

Location : The sub-surface of the three city 

block area bounded by Geary, Post, 
Laguna and Fillmore Streets 

Capacity : Self-parking 854 stalls 

Attendant-parking - 1,200 stalls 

Size : One complete and one partial (2/3) 

underground level 



Honorable George Christopher 
September 12, 1961 
Page 5 



Land Cost: 



Estimated Construction Cost 



Operation: 



Proposed Rate Schedule: 



$1, 141, 076 

$2,937,674 

Self-parking, attendant-parking 
optional 

255!: an hour, maximum to 6 p.m. 
Si. 50; maximum 24 hours $2.50 



GOLDEN GATEWAY UNDERGROUND GARAGE 

This project is under joint development by Perini-San Francisco 
Associates, the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency and the Parking Authority 
also subject to official approval by the City. 

Preliminary plans are in process which indicate the following: 

Location: The sub-surface of the two city 

block area bounded by Washington, 
Clay, Davis and Battery Streets 



Capacity : 
Size : 

Land Cost : 

Estimated Construction Cost 

Operation : 

Proposed Rate Schedule : 



Self-parking - 1,326 stalls 

460,446 sq. ft. comprising three 
or four underground levels to be 
determined 

$2,580,000 

$4,010,000 

Self-parking 

To be determined 



The foregoing new off-street parking projects completed or under 
development jointly by government and private business may be summarized as 
follows : : 

St. Mary's Square Garage 
Fifth and Mission Garage 
Sutter-Stockton Garage 
Civic Center Plaza Garage 
Portsmouth Square Underground 

Garage 
Fifth and Mission Garage 

Expansion 
Japanese Cultural Center 

Garage 
Golden Gateway Garage 
Civic Center Auto Park 
Forest Hill Parking Plaza 

8,097 parking stalls 



828 


parking stalls 


1,083 


ii 


932 


ii 


1,461 


ii 


BOO 


ii 


500 


it 


854 


ii 


1,326 


it 


300 


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Honorable George Christopher 
September 12, 1961 
Page 6 

Policy Point Mo. 3 : Direct public financing and construction... 

including site acquisition, where private 
construction was not or could not be under- 
taken 

No construction under this category was undertaken during 
this past fiscal year. 

The 8,500 special event parking stalls at Candlestick Park 
are considered a special case and are not carried as an 
increment of the general parking program. 

Past construction under this category consists of: 

Mission-Bartlett Parking Plaza 250 parking stalls 

Lakeside Village Parking Plaza k3 " 

7th and Harrison Parking Plaza 35^ " 

653 parking stalls 

NEIGHBORHOOD SHOPPING DISTRICT 
PARKING FACILITIES 

The parking program recommended by the Parking Authority on August 31, 
1961, for the neighborhood shopping districts of the City will be a major 
addition to parking facilities provided under this category of direct public 
financing and construction. 

The program contemplates: 

22 public parking lots, and 

k public parking garages, in 

15 neighborhood shopping districts, with 

1,006 parking stall total capacity, for 

1^,000,000 estimated approximate cost 

Upon completion of the neighborhood parking program, the number of 
parking facilities constructed under this category will be: 25 public 
parking lots; and U public parking garages; with a total capacity of 
1,659 parking stalls. 

Policy Point No. k : Operation of completed facilities. 

Neither during the past year, nor at any time, has it been 
found necessary to resort to public operation of parking 
facilities provided under the San Francisco Parking Program. 
In all cases, operation has been entrusted to private lessees. 















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Honorable George Christopher 
September 12, 1961 
Page 7 

Accomplishments to date under the foregoing program may be 
summarized as follows: 

1. Private Financing 
1) Completed: 

a) 1960-61 1,241 parking stall.' 

b) 1949-60 12,020 parking stalls 

c) Total 13,261 parking stall; 

11) Total under Wo. 1 13,261 parking stall' 

2. Public-Private Financing 
1) Completed: 

a) 1960-61 932 parking stall 

b) 1949-60 3,6B5 parking stall 

c) Total 4,617 parking stall 

11) Under Development: 

a) 1960-61 3,480 parking stall 

111) Total under Mo. 2 8,097 parking stall 

3. Public Financing 
1) Completed: 

a) 1960-61 - parking stall 

b) 1949-60 653 parking stall 

c) Total 653 parking stall 

11) Under Development: 

a) 1960-61 1,006 parking stall 

111) Total under No. 3 1,659 parking stall 

4. GRAND TOTAL 23,017 parking stal." 

The actual and projected total cost of this program is approximately 
$52 million of which, under the Parking Authority's program and policy, on 
about $9 million will have required public financing; roughly only about 
17% of the total. 



Honorable George Christopher 
September 12, 1961 
Page B 

Parking Automobiles - the Major Objective 

Although the public parking program will be expanding rapidly 
during the next year, a very extensive parking service has already been 
extended to the motorists of San Francisco and the Bay Area, witness the 
following report of service rendered: 

1st 6 Mos. Calendar 
Automobiles Calendar Yr. Calendar Yr. Calendar Yr. Calendar Yr.Year 
Parked 1953-5*4-55 1956-57-58 1959-60 1961 Totals 

Civic Center 
Plaza Garaae 
opened 3/1/60 153,757(60) 1*+6,871 300,628 

Civic Center 913(53) 113,025(56) 110,*+03(59) 59,187 8*+7,879 
Auto Park 96,801(5*+) 128,317(57) 116,760(60) 

opened 12/18/53 101,*+33(55) 121,0^0(58) 

Fifth & Mission 768,857(59) 39*+, 270 2,259,623 

Parking 8*+3, 597(60) 

opened 8/28/58 252,899(58) 

Marshall Square 61,299(59) 26,658 167,027 

Auto Park 62,518(60) 

opened 9/16/58 16,552(58) 

Mission-Bartlett 92,*+83(53) 208,715(56) 192,309(59) 83,067 1,591,960 
Parking Plaza 238,852(5*+) 19*+, 569(57) 183,977(60) 
opened 7/30/53 212,813(55) 185,175(58) 

St. Mary's Sq. 292,296(56) 39*+, 630(59) 178,095 2,358,902 

Garage 115,205(5*+)* 336,360(57) 376,537(60) 

opened 5/12/5*+ 281,118(55) 38*+, 661(58) 

Lakeside Village 12,000(56) 57,500(59) 28,750** 270,750 

Parking Plaza 57,500(57) 57,500(60) 

opened 9/27/56 57,500(58) 

Forest Hill 22,950(59) ll,*+75** 91,800 

Parking Plaza ll,*+75(57) 22,950(60) 

opened 7/57 22,950(58) 

7th & Harrison *+2,8*+3(59) 3,058***103,151 

Parking Plaza *+2, 581(60) 

opened *+/58 1*+, 669(58) 

Sutter -Stock ton 

Garage 3*+, 731(60) 205,*+12 2*+0,l*+3 

opened 11/19/61 



93,396(53) 626,036(56) 1,650,791(59) 1 , 136 , 8*+3(61 

*+50, 858(5*+) 728,221(57) 1 ,89*+ , 908(60) 

Total 595,36*+(55) 1 ,055 , *+*+6(58) 

Automobiles 

Parked 1,139,618 2,*+09,703 3,5*+5,699 l,136,8*+3 8,231,863 






[ 









Honorable George Christopher 
September 12, 1961 
Page 9 

RECAP : 

Automobiles Parked 93,396 (53) 
all projects 450,858 (54) 
1953-54-55 595,36*+ (55) 

1,139,618 

Automobiles Parked 626,036 (56) 

all projects 728,221 (57) 

1956-57-58 1,055,446 (58) 

2,409,703 

Automobiles Parked 1,650,791 (59) 

all projects 1,894,908 (60) 

1959-60 3,545,699 

Automobiles Parked 

all projects 

6/30/61 1, 136.BU3 (61) 

Total Automobiles Parked all projects 8 ,231,863 



* 

* * 

* * * 



Garage has no record of autos parked for May and June, 195*+. 
Estimated, as no actual count taken of this facility. 
Facility closed for repair for months of February, March, April, 
May, June, July and August. Operation resumed September 7, 1961. 

In addition, the parking at Candlestick Park special ev/ent parking 
area was as follows: 

Automobiles parked 317,814 

Buses parked 4,341 

Season parking 258 

The Farkinq Bond Fund Financial Report 

For your additional information, we show: 

1. Revenues from public parking projects: 

Civic Center Auto Park 1960-61 Total 

Income Received $43,764.46 $301,513.31 
Taxes Received (1961-62) 1,356.80 

Taxes Received Total 13,726.43 

$45,121.26 1315,239.74 






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Honorable George Christopher 
September 12, 1961 
Page 10 



Mission-Bartlett Parking Plaza 
Income Received 
Taxes Received (1961-62) 
Taxes Received Total 



St. Mary's Square Garage 
Income Received 
Taxes Received (1961-62) 
Taxes Received Total 



Lakeside Village Parking Plaza 
Income Received 
Taxes Received (1961-62) 
Taxes Received Total 



7th & Harrison Parking Pla z a 
Income Received 
Taxes Received (1961-62) 
Taxes Received Total 



Forest Hill Parking Plaza 
Income Received 
Taxes Received (1961-62) 
Taxes Received Total 



Alameda-York Parking Plaza * 
Income Received 
Taxes Received (1961-62) 
Taxes Received Total 



Marshall Square Parking Plaza 
Income Received 
Taxes Received (1961-62) 
Taxes Received Total 



GRAND TOTAL 

Income Received 

Taxes Received (1961-62) 

Taxes Received Total 



1960-61 Total 

1123,661.38 $17**, 661. 52 

288.32 

1,075.83 
&23,9/+9.70 £175,737.35 



28,069.12 176,6^5.00 

32,118.00 

223, 82/+. 88 
360,187.12 $/+00,/+69.B8 



$ 1,980.00 



3,981.8/+ 



9,/+05.00 



3 1,980.00 1 9,/+05.00 



23,/+/+5.85 



3,981.8/+ $ 23.M+5.85 



80/+. 00 % 3,216.00 



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238,627. 1/+ 



>163,Z+56.05 Si, 025, 527. /+3 



Honorable George Christopher 
September 12, 1961 
Page 11 

In the case of Fifth and Mission Garage, Civic Center Plaza 
and Sutter-Stocktan Garage, under the contract the rent 
payable to the City annually is an amount equal to 100% 
of the net income after the payment of operating costs 
and debt service charges. 

*This was a temporary installation of 300 parking spaces 
at Seals Stadium for the Giants 1 baseball games furnished 
through the courtesy of Hamm Brewing Company. It was dis- 
continued upon the opening of the new baseball stadium at 
Candlestick Park. 

The foregoing income has been deposited in the General Fund insofar 
as tax amounts and tax reimbursements are concerned. The balance of 
$196,025.50 has been deposited in the Parking Bond Fund. 

2. Present status of Parking Bond Fund: 

Appropriated $5,230,438.41 

Original Bond Fund 5,000,000.00 

Deposited to Account 230,438.41 

Air Rights - St. Mary's Square Garage 9 9,890.00 

130,548.41 

Unappropriated 65 ,477.09 

Rentals i 196,025.50 

Expenditures as of June 30, 1961 $5,230,438.41 
Encumbered 

Unencumbered - 

Total Allotted to Date 5,230,438.41 
Reserve 

Unallotted Balance of Appropriation - 

Total Appropriated 15,230,438.41 

Balance Sheet 

Gross Income from all Projects (June 30, 1961) 

Rent % 129,692.93 

Taxes 33,763.12 

Other Sources 4.03 

I 163,460.08 

Costs and Expenses 

Tax Roll Deduction $104,234.00 

Parking Authority Current 

Operating 42,838.00 

Parking Authority Supplemental 

Appropriations 2,101.72 149,173.72 

(Met Income $ 14,286.36 



Honorable George Christopher 
September 12, 1961 
Page 12 

Your attention is also directed to the net income allocated 
to the "Off-Street Parking Fund" from the surplus parking 
meter revenues from January 1, 1959, to June 30, 1961. 
This amounts to $934,412.09. 

Full Financial Summary 

The financial magnitude of San Francisco's present municipal parking 
program is shown in the following record of gross income to the City and 
County of San Francisco for the fiscal year July, 1960, to June, 1961, 
from revenues, rents and taxes from the combined City-owned parking 
facilities: 

Source Amount 

12,347 parking meters Si, 500, 003. 64 

B parking lots and garages* 193,436.01 

1 Special Events Parking 259,967.73 

(Candlestick Park) ^1,953,427.38 



* Revenues from non-profit operations of Fifth and Mission, 
Sutter-Stockton and Civic Center Garages not included. 

Information and Consultation Services 

Again San Francisco's pre-eminent position and success in the emerging 
field of municipal parking is bringing it national, even international, recog- 
nition and attention. This has led to a steadily increasing number of 
inquiries and personal visits from other cities and public officials during 
the past year, to which the Authority staff and members have responded insofa: 
as personnel and time limitations have permitted. 

In addition a steadily increasing function of the Parking Authority has 
been the extension of parking information to local business associations, 
institutions and neighborhood groups who have need of such limited advice 
as the Authority can provide on such matters. 

Acknowledgment 

The Parking Authority wishes to express its appreciation and to ac- 
knowledge the cooperation and assistance of yourself, the members of the Boar 
of Supervisors, the City Attorney, Controller, Chief Administrative Officer, 
Director of Property, Director of Public Uorks, Director of Planning, City 
Engineer, the private garage industry, the public-spirited citizens comprisin 
the corporations sponsoring many major projects, and others who have given so 
generously of their time and contributed so greatly to the advancement of its 
program during the past year. Respectfully submitted, 

For: Parking Authority of the City 
VTF:hj ^a^d-'County o^- -Ssf*. Francisco 

Ends. □ frC^l'fj^Ky*?*-*-^ — 

y " l/ining^/. Fisher, General Mgr. 



[/ 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OOClj. 

MAY 2Q i: 

SAN FRANK 



FVJQCIC Cfj^Sc^ 



to 
HON. GEORGE CHRISTOPHER, MAYOR 

PARKING AUTHORITY 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1962 




Civic Center Plaza Garage 



DAVID THOMSON, Chairman 

ARTHURS. BECKER, Member G. BALTZER PETERSON, Member 

DONALD MAGNIN, Member JOHN E. SULLIVAN, Member 

VINING T. FISHER, Director 
THOMAS J. O'TOOLE, Secretary 



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TY HALL ANNEX - 450 AAcALLISTER STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 2, CALIFORNIA 
HEmlock 1-2121, EXT. 741 



OF THE CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



GEORGE CHRISTOPHER, Mayor 



Highlights of San Francisco Parking Authority 
Annual Report to the Mayor 
for 
Fiscal Year endinp June 30, 1962 



1) San Francisco's ten publicly-owned parking facilities, established 

to date under the Parking Authority program, hav/e parked the following 
number of automobiles as indicated: 



Calendar Year 1961: 

First Six Months of 
Calendar Year 1962: 

Since Establishment: 



2,372,900 automobiles 

1,335.536 automobiles 
10.803,276 automobiles 



2) The City and County of San Francisco has received the following income 
in rent and taxes from these parking facilities: 



Fiscal Year 1961-1962: 
Total since Establishment 



$161, 59**. 28 
$1,187,121.71 



3) The financial magnitude of San Francisco's municipal parking program, 
including 12,3^7 parking meters, Union Square Garage and Candlestick 
Park Parking Plaza, as well as the ten garages and parking lots noted 
above, is shown by the gross income therefrom of $1,862,021.05 for the 
fiscal year July 1, 1961, to June 30, 1962 . 

<0 Since 19^9 under the Parking Authority program 20.259 new off-street 
parking stalls have been built in San Francisco. 

Another 3,926 are under construction or development at this time. 

The Grand Total of 2^,185 parking stalls will have been constructed 
since 19^9 when present development is completed . 

5) The actual and projected total cost of this program is approximately 
$55 million which will have been accomplished by the expenditure of 
only $9 million of public funds ; 16% of the total. 



' 












Highlights of Annual Report 
June 30, 1962 
Page 2 

6) The following number of new parking stalls mere constructed in San 
Francisco during the fiscal year July l t 1961, to June 30, 1962 : 

Lots Garages Stalls 

By Private Enterprise 10 2 1,22B 

By Public-Private Cooperation - 

City-owned - 1 500' 

10 3 1,728 



* Fifth and Mission Garage Expansion 
rf) Forthcoming major parking projects in San Francisco: 

Under Construction 
(1) Portsmouth Sguare Underground Garage BOO stalls 

Under Development 

(1) Japanese Cultural Center Garage BOO stalls 

(2) Golden Gateway Garage 1,326 stalls 

(3) Neighborhood Parking Program 1,000 stalls 

3,126 stalls 

8) Parking Authority Balance She&t - Year ending June 30, 1962 : 

(1) Gross Income to City (Authority projects 
exclusive of Candlestick Park) $161,594.28 

(2) Costs and Expenses** 148,082.00 



(3) Net Income $ 13,512.28 



** Includes $104,234 in lieu taxes and 
$43,848 Authority Operating Budget. 



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THE PARKING AUTHORITY of the 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



GEORGE CHRISTOPHER. MAYOR 



CITY HALL ANNEX 
ROOM 603 



450 McAllister street 



September 11, 1962 



SAN FRANCISCO 2, CALIFORNIA 
HEmlock 1-2121, EXT 741 



MEMBERS: 

DAVID THOMSON 
CHAIRMAN 

ARTHUR S. BECKER 
DONALD MAGNIN 
G. BALTZER PETERSON 
JOHN E. SULLIVAN 



VININGT. FISHER 
DIRECTOR 

THOMAS J. O'TOOLE 
SECRETARY 



Honorable George Christopher 

Mayor, City and County of San Francisco 

City Hall - Civic Center 

San Francisco 2, California 

Dear Mayor Christopher: 

Statement of Activities of the Parking Authority 

City and County of San Francisco 
Fiscal Year ending June 3D, 1962 

The Report of the San Francisco Parking Authority for the fiscal year 1961- 
1962, together with supplemental information you have requested, is herewith 
respectfully submitted. 

The financial report is set forth in attached copies of the Authority's four 
(*+) quarterly financial reports. 

The major accomplishments and activities of the Authority for the past year 
are shown below. These have been classified according to the Authority's 
four-point policy and program adapted March 8, 1950. 



Policy Point IMo. 1 : 



Stimulation of and cooperation with private enterprise 
to finance and construct the facilities required under 
the off-street parking program. 

New Parking Facilities 
Reported Completed and Placed in Operation 
since July 1, 1961 



Fairmont Hotel addition (garage) 
One Fourth Street (garage and lot) 

Spear Street at Folsom (lot) 

Tehama between 6& and 5& Streets (lot) 

SE corner 10^ Street at Jessie (lot) 

Mission Street, Minna Street, East of 6tt Street (lot) 

West side of Oib Street at Market Street (lot) 

O'Farrell Street between Powell and Mason Streets (lot) 



Stalls 

170 
100 

30 
30 
63 
30 
2k 
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Honorable George Christopher 
September 11, 1962 
Page 2 



Stalls 



WE corner Clay Street and Van Ness Av/enue (lot) 51 

939 Mission Street (lot) kO 

Del Webb's Townehouse (lot) 600 

539 Minna Street (lot) k5 

1,228 stalls 

These additions brought the total of new off-street parking spaces provided 
under this phase of the Authority program since October 6, 1949, to 14,489 
stalls. 

Policy Point Mo. 2 : Public cooperation with private enterprise to provide 

off-street parking by public provision of garage sites 
and private provision of the construction financing. 

The following major downtown parking project was completed under this policy 
category . 

The operation is by a non-profit corporation with any profit accruing to the 
City and County of San Francisco. 

Our rapidly mounting supply of modern, conveniently located, low-cost parking 
is made possible by the attraction of private money and low overhead costs, 
resulting from tax relief accorded public service enterprises and jurisdictions 
acting in the public interest. 

FIFTH AMD MISSION GARAGE EXPANSION 

Additional Parking Area 200,000 sq. ft. (2 levels) 

Total Parking Area 600,000 sq. ft. (6 levels) 

Additional Parking Stalls 500 

Total Parking Stalls 1,583 

Additional Project Cost $1,000,000 

Total Construction Cost S3, 135,000 

Completion Date November 21, 1961 

Contractor Cahill Construction Co. 

Engineers Gould & Degenkolb 

Operator City of San Francisco Downtown 

Parking Corporation 



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Honorable George Christopher 
September 11, 1962 
Page 3 

Management S. E. Onorato, Inc. 

Operation Self-parking 

Parking Rates 150 1 hr. 

$1.25 maximum 2k hrs. 

$17.50 Monthly 

$15.00 (Wight Monthly 
fleet rate) 

The expansion was buil'; under an agreement between the City of San Francisco 
Downtown Parking Corporation, a non-profit corporation, and the City and 
County of San Francisco. The Parking Authority acted as the agent for the 
City and County of San Francisco in this arrangement. 

Previous Construction in this Category 

The following garages had been previously financed and built as cooperative 
projects between City and private business: 

Total 
Date Stall Land Construction Project 
Name Completed Capacity Cost Cost Cost 

St. Mary's Sq. Garage 5/12/54 828 $400,000 $2,100,000- $2,500,000- 

2,300,000 2,700,000 

Fifth & Mission Garage 8/28/58 1,083 $1,600,000 $2,135,000 $3,735,000 

Civic Center Plaza Garage 3/1/60 1,461 -0- $4,500,000 $4,500,000 

Sutter-Stockton Garage 11/19/60 932 $2,550,000 $3,680,000 $6,230,000 

Under Construction in this Category 

The following garage construction was in progress or under development in this 
category: 

PORTSMOUTH SQUARE UNDERGROUND GARAGE 

On August 11, 1959, the City of San Francisco Portsmouth Plaza Parking Corpora- 
tion filed a letter of intent to finance and construct this facility and sub- 
mitted the legal documents for review and approval on August 20, 1959. Con- 
struction began on November 15, 1960. Because of strike difficulties, though 
this garage was scheduled for completion in June, 1962, it opened for business 
August 24, 1962. 






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Honorable George Christopher 
September 11, 1962 
Page 4 



The physical and financial characteristics of the iroject are as follows: 

Location Sub-surface of Protsmouth Plaza, 

fronting on Kearny Street between 
Washington and Clay Streets 



Capacity 

Size 

Land Cost 
Construction Cost 
Operation 
Rate Schedule 



Self-parking 500 stalls 
Attendant-parking - 800 stalls 

Three underground lev/els and 
mezzanine 

None. Property City-owned 

$3,200,000 

Self-parking 

25£ or 1 coupon 1 hr. 
25(2 or 1 coupon Ea. addl. hr. 
Si. 50 or 8 coupons 24 hrs. 
$25 (limited to Monthly 
100 spaces) 

$20 book of 100 coupons 

A validation program is also in effect for merchants in the area, and for 
the sale of services in the garage. 

JAPANESE CULTURAL CENTER UNDERGROUND GARAGE 

This project is under joint development by the City of San Francisco Western 
Addition Parking Corporation, the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency and the 
Parking Authority, subject to official approval of the City. Construction 
is expected to begin in 1962, subject to such approval. 

Present estimates indicate the following physical and financial facts of this 
project: 



Location 

Capacity 
Size 



Sub-surface of the three city 
block area bounded by Geary, 
Post, Laguna and Fillmore Streets 

Self-parking 800 stalls 
Attendant-parking - 1100 stalls 

One complete and one partial (2/3) 
underground level 



Land Cost 



$256,640 



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Honorable George Christopher 
September 11, 1962 
Page 5 



Estimated Construction Cost 
Operation 

Proposed Rate Schedule 



Proposed Rate Schedule - Unit B on 

Fillmore St. 



S3, 750, 000 

Self-parking, attendant-parking 
optional 

25* 1 hr. 

Si. 50 maximum to 6 p.m. 
S2.50 maximum 2k hrs. 

Under rates comparable to those 

of the Neighborhood Parking Program 



G0L0EN GATEWAY UNDERGROUND GARAGE 

This project is under joint development by Perini-San Francisco Associates, 
the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency and the Parking Authority also sub- 
ject to official approval by the City. 

Preliminary plans are in process which indicate the following: 

Location Sub-surface of the two city block 

area bounded by Washington, Clay, 
Davis and Battery Streets 



Capacity 
Size 

Land Cost 

Estimated Construction Cost 

Operation 

Proposed Rate Schedule 



Self-parking - 1,326 stalls 

i+60,^+46 sq. ft. comprising three 
or four underground levels to be 
determined 

$2,580,000 

$^,010,000 

Self-parking 

To be determined 



The foregoing new off-street parking projects completed or under development 
jointly by government and private business under the Parking Authority progrs 
may be summarized as fallows: 

Stalls 



St. Mary's Square Garage 
Fifth and Mission Garage 
Sutter-Stockton Garage 
Civic Center Plaza Garage 



828 
1,083 

932 
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Honorable George Christopher 
September 11, 1962 
Page 6 



Portsmouth Sq. Underground Garage 
Fifth & Mission Garage Expansion 
Japanese Cultural Center Garage 
Golden Gateway Garage 
Civic Center Auto Park 
Forest Hill Parking Plaza 



Stalls 

800 
500 
800 
1,326 
300 

13 

8,0^3 



Policy Point No. 3 : 



Direct public financing and construction, including 
site acquisition, where private construction was not 
or could not be undertaken. 



No construction under this category was undertaken during this past fiscal 
year. 

The 8,500 special event parking stalls at Candlestick Park are considered 
a special case and are not carried as an increment of the general parking 
program. 

Past construction under this category consists of: 

Stalls 



Mission-Bartlett Parking Plaza 
Lakeside Willage Parking Plaza 
7th and Harrison Parking Plaza 



250 
35U 



653 



NEIGHBORHOOD SHOPPING DISTRICT PARKING FACILITIES 

The basic parking program adopted by the Parking Authority on August 31, 
1961, for the neighborhood shopping districts of the City will be a major 
addition to parking facilities provided under this category of direct 
public financing and construction. 

The program contemplates: 

22 public parking lots, and 
k public parking garages, in 

15 neighborhood shopping districts, with 
1,000 parking stall total capacity, for 
$^,106,500 estimated approximate cost 

Upon completion of the neighborhood parking program, the number of parking 
facilities constructed under this category will be: 

25 public parking lots, and 
k public parking garages, with 
1,653 parking stall total capacity 









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Honorable George Christopher 
September 11, 1962 
Page 7 

Financing Time Schedule : 

1) The Controller of the City and County of San Francisco has estimated 
that the basic program can be financed in its entirety from monies 
noui on deposit in our "Off-Street Parking Fund", plus the estimated 
increments which will be realized as of July 1, 1967. 

2) The neighborhood program providing off-street parking facilities in 
these neighborhood districts has, because of necessity, been divided 
in order of priority into three (3) distinct phases. 

Phase I : 

District General Location Cost 

Eureka V/alley Castro Street $90,000 

West Portal West Portal Avenue 157,000 

Geary Geary Street at 21st Avenue 90,000 

Outer Irving Irving at 20^ Avenue 109,000 

l\loe V/alley 2^ Street and Castro Street 51,000 

Marina Pierce Street betueen Chestnut 379,000 

and Lombard $876,000 

Phase II : 

District General Location Cost 

Mission Hoff and Rondel at 16tb Street $295,320 

Clement 8ib and 9tb Avenues 18^,500 

Bay V/ieu Quesada Avenue 9,200 

Inner Irving Btb and 9** Avenues 189,700 

Haight-Ashbury Haight Street at Cole Street 138,600 

$817,320 

Hearings on the following have been completed and action thereon stands 
as indicated: 

Site Under Alternate Site 

Designated Submission to be Presented 

Eureka V/alley Mission Marina 

(Castro St.) (Hoff-Rondel) Clement (8i*-9i* Ave.) 
Idest Portal Haight-Ashbury Bay View 

(West Portal Ave.) Inner Irving (8tb-9tt? Ave.) 

Geary 

(Geary Blvd.) 
Outer Irving 

(20tb Ave.) 
IMoe V/alley 

(2M* St.) 



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Honorable George Christopher 
September 11, 1962 
Page B 



Status of Appropriations 
for Land and Construction 



District 

Eureka valley 

(Castro St.) 
Uest Portal 

(West Portal Ave.) 
Geary 

(Geary Blvd.) 
Outer Irving 

(20«3 Ave.) 
Noe Valley 

iZkm St.) 
Mission 

(Hoff -Rondel) 
Haight-Ashbury 

Total 
Phase III: 



Appropriated 
$ 90,000 



$109,000 
$ 51,000 



1250,000 



Appropriation Under 
Pending Submission 



$157,000 
$ 90,000 



$2<+7,000 



$295,320 

$136,600 
$^33,920 



District 

Excelsior 
Polk Street 
Portola 
North Beach 
Excelsior 
Eureka Valley 
Uest Portal 
Geary 
Mission 



General Location 

Mission and San Juan Avenue 

Sacramento Street 

Felton Street 

Green Street 

Mission Street 

18i£ Street and Collinguood 

Claremont Boulevard and Ulloa 

18** and 194* Avenues 

Capp, Lilac Street, 2*4& Street 



Cost 

$151,000 
2if3,000 
35,500 
52^,000 
128,000 
108,500 
117,000 
115,000 
179,500 
11,601,500 



These will be scheduled immediately for study by the Board of Supervisors. 

An additional six alternate locations for three sites in the Mission District 
and one each in the Clement Street, Portola and Outer Irving Districts are 
still under study. 






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Honorable George Christopher 
September 11, 1962 
Page 9 



Policy Point No. 4 : Operation of completed facilities. 

Neither during the past, nor at any time, has it been found necessary to 
resort to public operation of parking facilities provided under the San 
Francisco Parking Program. In all cases, operation has been entrusted 
to private lessees. 

Proposed Downtown Parkinp Survey 

The Authority is also vitally concerned in the development of a comprehensive 
parking survey of the downtown area in order to inventory existing parking 
facilities; survey parking practices and the usage of our present facilities 
and, of the utmost importance, to estimate present and future parking needs 
of the motoring public both in the event of rapid transit and without rapid 
transit; and also in the event of a planned freeway development or, if 
necessary, without freeway development. It is the consensus of opinion that 
such a study, if conducted, would prove of inestimable value not only to the 
Authority, the City as a whole, but also to the State of California in 
planning and developing traffic patterns for the future. 

The Division of Highways of the State of California has indicated a desire 
to enter into an agreement with the City to pay a proportionate share of the 
cost of such a survey. 

The Bureau of Public Roads of the Federal government has promised assistance 
of their staff if such a survey is undertaken. 

Comprehensive joint parking studies of this kind have been conducted in many 
of the nation's larger cities. 

Accomplishments to date under the foregoing program may be summarized as 
follows: 



1. Private Financing 
1) Completed: 

a) 1961-1962 

b) 1949-1961 

c) Total 

11) Total under No. 1 

2. Public-Private Financing 
1) Completed: 

a) 1961-1962 

b) 1949-1961 

c) Total 



Stalls 

1,228 
13,261 
14,489 



500 
4,617 
5,117 



Stalls 



14,489 



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Honorable George Christopher 
September 11, 1962 
Page 10 

11) Under Development: Stalls Stalls Stalls 

a) 1961-1962 2,926 

111) Total under Mo. 2 6,01+3 

3. Public Financing 
1) Completed: 

a) 1961-1962 

b) 191*9-1961 653 

c) Total 653 

11) Under Development: 

a) 1961-1962 1,000 

111) Total under No. 3 1,653 

k< GRAND TOTAL 2l+,185 

The actual and projected total cost of this program is approximately $55 
million of which, under the Parking Authority's program and policy, only 
about $9 million will have required public financing; roughly only about 
16% of the total. 

Parking Automobiles - The Major Objective 

Although the public parking program uill be expanding rapidly during the 
next year, a very extensive parking service has already been extended to 
the motorists of San Francisco and the Bay Area, witness the following 
report of service rendered: 

1st 6 Mos. Gr. Total 
Automobiles Calendar Yr. Calendar Yr. Calendar Yr. Calendar Yr. ending 
Parked 1953-5^-55 1956-57-5B 1959-60-61 1962 6/30/62 

Civic Center 913(53) 113,025(56) .110,1+03(59) 57,319 958,819 
Auto Park 96,801(5*0 128,317(57) 116,760(60) 
opened 12/18/53 101,1+33(55) 121,01+0(58) 112,808(61) 

Civic Center 169,776 607,733 

Plaza Garage 153,757(60) 

opened 3/1/60 281+, 200(61) 

Fifth & Mission 768,857(59) 1+63,283 3,11+5,59: 

Parking 81+3,597(60) 

opened 8/28/58 252,899(58) 816,557(61) 









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Honorable George Christopher 
September 11, 1962 
Page 11 



Automobiles 
Parked 



Calendar Yr. Calendar Yr. 
1953-51*^55 1956-57-58 



1st 6 Mos. Gr. Total 
Calendar Yr. Calendar Yr. ending 
1959-60-61 1962 6/30/62 



Forest Hill 
Parking Plaza 
opened 7/57 

Lakeside Village 
Parking Plaza 
opened 9/27/56 

Marshall Square 
Auto Park 
opened 9/16/58 

Miss ion -Bar tlett 
Parking Plaza 
opened 7/30/53 

St. Mary's Sq. 

Garage 

opened 5/12/51* 

7tb & Harrison 
Parking Plaza 
opened 1+/58 

Sutter-Stockton 

Garage 

opened 11/19/61 



Total 

Automobiles 

Parked 



11,V75(57) 
22,950(58) 

12,000(56) 
57,500(57) 
57,500(58) 



16,552(58) 



92,1*83(53) 208,715(56) 
238,852(51*) 191+ , 569(57) 
212,813(55) 185,175(58) 



11*, 669(58) 



22 
22 
22 



57 
57 

57 

61 
62 
1*8 

192 
183 
175 



292,296(56) 391* 
115, 205(5<+)*336, 360(57) 376 
281,118(55) 381*, 661(58) 353 



1*2 
1*2 
10 



31* 
1*85 



93,396(53) 626,036(56) 1,650 
1*50,858(51+) 728,221(57) 1,891+ 
595. 361+( 55)1.055. 1+1+6(58 ) 2.372 



1,139,618 2,1+09,703 



950(59) 11,1*75** 11!*,75C 

950(60) 

950(61) 



500(59) 
500(60) 
500(61) 

299(59) 
518(60) 
682(61) 

309(59) 
977(60) 
61*2(61) 

630(59) 
537(60) 
757(61) 

81*3(59) 
581(60) 
020(61) 



731(60) 
38<+(61) 



28,750** 328, 25C 



22,253 



81,1+1*1 



211,30' 



l,765,97t 



190,821+ 2,730,38 



20,570' 



289,667 



130,68 



809,78 



791(59)1,335,358(62) 

908(60) 

900(61) 



5,918,599 1,335,358 10,803,27 



RECAP 



Automobiles Parked 93,396(53) 
all projects 1*50,858(51*) 
1953-5l*-55 595.361+ (55) 

1,139,618 



Automobiles Parked 
all projects 
1956-57-58 



Automobiles Parked 
all projects 
1959-60-61 



626,036(56) 
728,221(57) 

1,055,1*1*6 (58) 

2,1*09,703 



1,650,791(59) 
1,891*, 908(60) 
2,372,900 (61 
5,918,599 



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Honorable George Christopher 
September 11, 1962 
Page 12 

Automobiles Parked 1,335,358(62) 

all projects 

6/30/62 

GRAND TOTAL Automobiles Parked all projects to 6/30/62 inclusive 10,803,276 

* Garage has no record of autos parked for May and June, 195*t. 
** Estimated, as no actual count taken of this facility. 
*** Facility closed for repair for months of February, March, 

April, May, June, July and August. Operation resumed on 

September 7, 1961. 

In addition, the parking at Candlestick Park special event parking area 
was as follous: 

Fiscal Year 1961-62 

Automobiles Parked 326,897 

Buses Parked 3,63^ 

Season Parking (1962) 2^3 

For your additional information, we show: 

1) Revenues from public parking projects: 

1961-62 Total to 6/30/62 
Alameda-York Parking Plaza* 

Income Received $ - $ 18,6<+8,5<+ 

Taxes Received (1961-62) 
Taxes Received Total 



$ - $ 18,6<+8.5<+ 

Candlestick Park 

Income Received $226, 796. 6*+ $671,392.34 
Taxes Received (1961-62) 1,187.20 

Taxes Received Total - 3,507.00 

1227,983.8^ $67<t ,899. 3k 

Civic Center Auto Park 

Income Received $ 42,290.9*+ $343 ,80*+. 25 
Taxes Received (1961-62) 1,356.80 

Taxes Received Total - 15,083.23 

% 43,647.74 $358,887.48 

Forest Hill Parking Plaza 

Income Received $ 804.00 $ 4, 020. 00 

Taxes Received (1961-62) 

Taxes Received Total _, - - 



804.00 $ 4,020.00 






Honorable George Christopher 
September 11, 1962 
Page 13 



Lakeside Village Parking Plaza 
Income Received 
Taxes Received (1961-62) 
Taxes Received Total 



Marshall Square Parking Plaza 
Income Received 
Taxes Received (1961-62) 
Taxes Received Total 



Mission-Bartlett Parking Plaza 
Income Received 
Taxes Received (1961-62) 
Taxes Received Total 



St. Mary's Square Garage 
Income Received 
Taxes Received (1961-62) 
Taxes Received Total 

7i* & Harrison Parking Plaza 
Income Received 
Taxes Received (1961-62) 
Taxes Received Total 



GRAND TOTAL 

Income Received 

Taxes Received (1961-62) 

Taxes Received Total 



1961-62 



Total to 6/30/62 



1,980.00 $ 11,385.00 



1 1,980.00 S 11,385.00 



24,212.74 $103,577.81 
161.12 

161.12 



24,373.86 $103,738.93 



$ 23,711.73 $196, 373.25 
288.32 

- 1,364.15 

$ 24,000.05 $199,737.40 



26,431.99 $205,076.99 
32,118.00 

255,942.88 



60,549.99 $461,019.87 
6,238.64 $ 29,684.49 



6,238.64 $ 29,684.49 



$354, 466. 68$1, 585, 962. 67 
35,111.44 

276,058.38 



1389,578.1; $1,662,021.05 



In the case of Fifth and Mission Garage, Civic Center Plaza and Sutter- 
Stockton Garage, under the contract the rent payable to the City annually 
is an amount equal to 100% of the net income after the payment of operating 
casts and debt service charges. 

* This was a temporary installation of 300 parking spaces at Seals Stadium 

for the Giants' baseball games furnished through the courtesy of Hamm 

Breuing Company. It was discontinued upon the opening of the new base- 
ball stadium at Candlestick Park. 

The foregoing income has been deposited in the General Fund insofar as 
tax amounts and tax reimbursements are concerned. The balance of 
$88,554.49 has been deposited in the Parking Bond Fund. (Unappropriated) 



Honorable George Christopher 
September 11, 1962 
Page Ik 






2) Present status of 19^+7 Parking Bond Fund: 

Original Bond Fund (authorized 19£+7) 
Increment from Project Rents 

Increment from Sale of Air Rights - St. Mary's 
Total Fund Accruals 

Appropriated to 6/30/62 
Unappropriated balance 6/30/62 



$5, 000, 000. 00 
219,102.90 



99,69 0.00 



i5, 318,992.90 



$5,230,<+38.<*l 
88,55^.49 



55,318,992.90 



Parking Authority Projects Balance Sheet 
Gross Income from all Projects (excluding Candlestick Park) June 30, 1962 



Rent 
Taxes 



Costs and Expenses: 



127,670.0*+ 
33,92/4.2*t 



1161,59^.28 



Tax Roll Deduction 

Parking Authority Current Operating 



10^,23^.00 
^3,848.00 



;i<+8,082.00 



Net Income: 



113,512.28 



Your attention is also directed to the net income allocated to the "Off- 
Street Parking Fund" from the surplus parking meter revenues from January 1, 
1959, to June 30, 1962. This amounts to $1,^52,3^7.25. 

Full Financial Summary 

The financial magnitude of San Francisco's present municipal parking program 
is shoun in the following record of gross income to the City and County of 
San Francisco for the fiscal year July, 1961, to June, 1962, from revenues, 
rents and taxes from the combined City-ouned parking facilities: 



Source 

12,3^+7 parking meters 

8 parking lots and garages 

1 Special Events Parking (Candlestick Park) 



Amount 

$1,^59,557.66 

321,8^9.21 

227,983.8<+ 
$2,009,390.71 



* Revenues from non-profit operations at Fifth and Mission, Sutter- 
Stockton and Civic Center Garages not included. 



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Honorable George Christopher 
September 11, 1962 
Page 15 



Information and Consultation Service s 

Again, San Francisco's pre-eminent position and success in the emerging 
field of municipal parking is bringing it national - even international - 
recognition and attention. This has led to a steadily increasing number 
of inquiries and personal visits from other cities and public officials 
during the past year, to which the Authority staff and members have 
responded insofar as personnel and time limitations have permitted. 

In addition, a steadily increasing function of the Parking Authority has 
been the extension of parking information to local business associations, 
institutions and neighborhood groups who have need of such limited advice 
as the Authority can provide on such matters. 

Acknowledgment 

The Parking Authority wishes to express its appreciation and to acknowledge 
the cooperation and assistance of yourself, the members of the Board of 
Supervisors, the City Attorney, Controller, Chief Administrative Officer, 
Director of Property, Director of Public Uorks, Director of Planning, City 
Engineer, the private garage industry, the public-spirited citizens com- 
prising the corporations sponsoring many major projects, and others who 
have given so generously of their time and contributed so greatly to the 
advancement of its program during the past year. 



Respectfully submitted, 

PARKING AUTHORITY OF THE 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



By/>^^/ 

VinisTg T. Fisher 
Director 



VTF:hj 
Attach. 



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AM 






PARKING AUTHORITY 

DAVID THOMSON, Chairman 

ARTHUR S. BECKER 

DONALD MAGNIN 

G. BALTZER PETERSON 

JOHN E. SULLIVAN 

Staff: 

VINING T. FISHER, Director 

THOMAS J. O'TOOLE, Secretary 



HONORABLE GEORGE CHRISTOPHER, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 



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CITY HALL ANNEX - 450 McALLISTER STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 2, CALIFORNIA 
HEmlock 1-2121, EXT. 741 



OF THE CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



GEORGE CHRISTOPHER, Mayor 



Highlights of San Francisco Parking Authority 
Annual Report to the Mayor 

for 
Fiscal Year ending June 30, 1963 

if--**************--****-***** 

I. 25>,26l new off-street parking spaces will have been completed with 
the construction of the Japanese Cultural Center and Golden Gateway 
Garages and the Neighborhood Shopping District parking facilities 
under the San Francisco Parking Authority Parking Program. 

II. $21.000.000 is the capital value of the five garages constructed 
under the Parking Authority municipal parking program since 19^9. 

The completion of the Japanese Cultural Center Garage and the Golden 
Gateway Garage will bring this total to $31,000,000 . 

Over 8,000 automobiles may be parked in these seven municipally- 
owned garages at one time. 

III. Approxi mate ly 1 , 000 park i ng space s , representing an investment of 
$lt,500,000 are in process of development in San Francisco's 
neighborhood shopping districts at this time. 

Eleven facilities, costing $1,365,^52 have been approved to date. 

IV. San Francisco's municipally-owned parking facilities developed 
under the Parking Authority program parked 1,566,709 automobiles 
in the first six months of 1963; 13,887»712 since inception of the 
program. 

V. Municipal revenue from nine municipal parking projects developed 
under the Authority program totalled $331,252.21+ in fiscal 1962-63. 

The grand total since inception to June 30, 1963 was $2,193,273.29. 

VT. Parking Authority Balance Sheet - Fiscal 1962-63: 



Gross Income from all projects, excluding 
Candlestick Park and Union Square Garage 



Costs and Expenses: 

Tax Roll Deduction 
Current Operating Budget 

MET INCOME 



$10U,23U.OO 

12,102.00 



$182,531.51 

$ 116,336.00 
$ 36, 195.51+ 






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MEMBERS: 

THE PARKING AUTHORITY of the dav.dthomson 



CHAIRMAN 



CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO Arthurs, becker 

DONALD MAGNIN 
GEORGE CHRISTOPHER. MAYOR G. BALTZER PETERSON 



JOHN E. SULLIVAN 



CITY HALL ANNEX • 450 McALLISTER STREET • SAN FRANCISCO 2, CALIFORNIA 

ROOM 403 HEmlock 1-2121, EXT 741 VINING T. FISHER 

DIRECTOR 

THOMAS J. OTOOLE 
SECRETARY 



September 6, 1963 



Honorable George Christopher, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 
City Hall - Civic Center 
San Francisco 2, California 

Statement of Activities of the Parking Authority 
City and County of San Francisco 
Fiscal Year ending June 30, 1963 

Dear Mayor Christopher I 

The Report of the San Francisco Parking Authority for the fiscal year 
1962-1963, together with supplemental information you have requested, is herewith 
respectfully submitted. 

The financial report is set forth in attached copies of the Authority's 
four (h) quarterly financial reports. 

The major accomplishments and activities of the Authority for the past 
year are shown below. These have been classified according to the Authority's 
four-point policy and program adopted March 8, 1950. 

Policy Point Mo. 1 : Stimulation of and cooperation with private 

enterprise to finance and construct the facilities 
required under the off-street parking program. 

New Parking Facilities 
Reported Completed and Placed in Operation 
since July 1, 1962 

Stalls 

Jackson, Pacific Avenue and Drumm Street (lot) 220 

UiO Sansome Street (lot) 71 

Scott and Geary Streets (lot) 32 

18th Avenue and Clement Street (lot) 16 

8th and Bryant Streets (lot) l£0 

Clay and Van Ness Avenue (lot) 35 

939 Mission Street (lot) 60 

3rd and Harrison Streets (lot) 1*0 

682 Ellis Street (lot) U0 

6th and Brannan Streets (lot) 120 

Howard Street between 10th and 11th Streets (lot) 16 

191 Sutter Street (garage) . JU3 

81l3 stalls 



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Honorable George Christopher, Mayor 
September 6, 1963 
Page 2 

These additions brought the total of new off-street parking spaces 
provided under this phase of the Authority program since October 6, 19^9, to 
15,332 stalls. 

Policy Point No. 2: Public cooperation with private enterprise to 

provide off-street parking by public provision 
of garage sites and private provision of the 
construction financing. 

The following major downtown parking project beneath historic Portsmouth 
Square was completed under this policy category and opened for business August 2ii, 
1962: 

Portsmouth Square Garage 

Location: Sub-surface of Portsmouth Plaza, fronting on Kearny Street 
between Washington and Clay Streets. 

Capacity: Self parking 50U stalls 

Attendant parking 800 stalls 

Size: Three underground levels and mezzanine 

Land cost: None. Property city-owned 

Project Cost: $3,200,000 (including all fees, commissions, and 

interest reserve) 

Completion Date: August 2U, 1962 

Contractor: Haas & Haynie 

Engineers: Gould & Degenkolb 

Operator: City of San Francisco Portsmouth Plaza Parking Corporation 

Management: S. E. Onorato, Incorporated 

Operation: Self parking, at present 

Parking rates: 2$i or 1 coupon 1 hour 

2$i or 1 coupon each additional hour 

$1.50 or 8 coupons 2h hours 

$25.00 Monthly 

Free parking with purchase of petroleum products or 

services as follows: 

$3.99-$U.98 1 hour 

$U.99-$5.98 2 hours 

$5. 99-$6. 98 3 hours 

$6.99-$7.98 h hours 

$7.99 and over 12 hours 









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Honorable George Christopher, Mayor 
September 6, 1963 
Page 3 

This project was built under agreement between the City and County of 
San Francisco and the City of San Francisco Portsmouth Plaza Parking Corporation, 
a non-profit corporation. The Parking Authority acted as the agent for the City and 
County of San Francisco in the development and consummation of this arrangement. 

Our rapidly mounting supply of modern, conveniently located, low-cost 
parking is made possible by the attraction of private money and low overhead costs, 
resulting from tax relief accorded public service enterprises and jurisdictions 
acting in the public interest. 

Previous Construction in this Category 

The following garages had been previously financed and built as coopera- 
tive projects between the City and private business: 













Total 




Date 


Stall 




Construction 


Project 


Name 


Completed 


Capacity 


Land Cost 


Cost 


Cost 


St. Mary*s Square 
Garage 


May 12, 
19$h 


828 


$ h00,000 


$2,300,000 


$2,700,000 


Fifth and Mission 
Garage 


Auaust 28, 
"1958 


1,083 


$1,600,000 


$2,135,000 


$3,735,000 


Fifth and Mission 
Garage Expansion 


November 21, 
1961 


500 


-0- 


$ 800,000 


$1,000,000 


Civic Center Plaza 
Garage 


March 1, 
I960 


1,1*61 


-0- 


$U, 500, 000 


$li,500, 000 


Sutter-Stockton 
Garage 


November 19, 
I960 


932 


$2,550,000 


$3,680,000 


$6,230,000 




Under Construction in 


this Catecjpry 





The following garage construction has been under development in this 
category: 

Japanese Cultural Center Underground Garage 

This project is under joint development by the City of San Francisco 
Western Addition Parking Corporation, the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency, and 
the Parking Authority, subject to official approval of the City. Construction is 
expected to begin in 1963, subject to such approval. 

Present estimates indicate the following physical and financial facts 
for this projects 

Location: Sub-surface of the three city block area bounded by Geary, 
Post, Laguna, and Fillmore Streets 



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Honorable George Christopher, Mayor 
September 6, 1963 
Page h 



Capacity: Self parking 800 stalls 

Attendant parking 1,100 stalls 

Size: One complete and one partial (2/3) underground level 

Land Cost: $256, 6I4O 

Estimated Construction Cost: $3,750,000 

Operation: Self-parking, attendant parking optional 

Proposed Rate Schedule: 25^ 1 hour 

$1.50 maximum to 6:00 P. M. 
$2.50 maximum 2ii hours 

Proposed Rate Schedule: Under rates comparable to those of the 
(Unit B on Fillmore Street) Neighborhood Parking Program 



Program. 



This area will eventually become a section of the planned Neighborhood 



Gol den Gateway Underground Garage 



This project is under joint development by the City of San Francisco 
Golden Gateway Parking Corporation, Perini-San Francisco Associates, the San 
Francisco Redevelopment Agency, and the Parking Authority, also subject to 
official approval by the City. 

Location: Sub-surface of the two city-block area bounded by 
Washington, Clay, Davis, and Battery Streets 

Capacity: Self parking - 1,326 stalls 

Size: U60,U*6 sq. ft. comprising three or four underground levels 
to be determined 

Land Cost: $2,580,000 

Estimated Construction Cost: $h, 010, 000 

Operation: Self parking 

Proposed Rate Schedule: To be determined 

The foregoing new off-street parking projects completed or under 
development jointly by government and private business under the Parking Authority 
program to date may be summarized as follows: 



Honorable George Christopher, Mayor 
September 6, 1963 
Page 5 



Stalls 






St. Mary's Square Garage 

Fifth and Mission Garage 

Fifth and Mission Garage Expansion 

Sutter-Stockton Garage 

Civic Center Plaza Garage 

Portsmouth Square Garage 

Japanese Cultural Center Garage 

Golden Gateway Garage 

Civic Center Auto Park 

Forest Hill Parking Plaza 




8,0^3 



Pol_icy P oint Mo. 3: Direct public financing and construction, 

including site acquisition, where private 
construction was not or could not be undertaken. 

Wo construction under this category was undertaken during this past 
fiscal year. 

The 8,500 special event parking stalls at Candlestick Park are 
considered a special case and are not carried as an increment of the general 
parking program. 

Past construction under this category consists of: 

Stalls 



Mission-Bartlett Parking Plaza 
Lakeside Village Parking Plaza 
7th and Harrison Parking Plaza 



250 

U9 

270 

569 



Neighborhood Shopping District Parking Facilities 

The basic parking program adopted by the Parking Authority on August 31, 
1961, for the neighborhood shopping districts of the City will be a major addition 
to parking facilities provided under this category of direct public financing and 
construction. 

The program comprises: 

22 public parking lots, and 
h public parking garages, in 
15 neighborhood shopping districts, with 
1,000 parking stall total capacity, for 
$U,l|01,3l5 estimated approximate cost 



Honorable George Christopher, Mayor 
September 6, 1963 
Page 6 



Thus far, necessary and essential properties have been acquired in the 
Eureka Valley, Noe Valley, Outer Irving and West Portal areas. Definite commit- 
ments have been received in other areas. Acquisition of property for a public 
project is slow and vexatious. The Authority, at all times, has done everything 
possible to alleviate hardship on families and owners of business whose properties 
have been required for such public use. We feel that we have been very successful 
in this portion of our program. 

Upon completion of the neighborhood parking program, the number and 
capacity of parking facilities constructed under this category will be: 



Number of facilities 
Number of parking stalls 



29 

1,569 



1. 



F i nanc i ng T i me S c hedul e 

The Controller of the City and County of San Francisco has estimated 
that the basic program can be financed in its entirety from monies 
now on deposit in our "Off -Street Parking Fund," plus the estimated 
increments which will be realized up to July 1, 1967. These are 
accruing from parking meter revenues at the rate of $525,000 a year. 

2. The neighborhood program, providing off-street parking facilities 
in these neighborhood districts, is as follows: 

Projects approved to da te: 11 





Parking 






District 


Stalls 
21 


General Location 


Cost 


Eureka Valley 


Castro Street 


$ 90,000 


Eureka Valley 


21 


Collingwood Street 


122,500 


West Portal 


22 


West Portal Avenue 


157,000 


West Portal 


20 


Claremont-Ulloa Streets 


167,000 


Geary 


22 


Geary Boulevard 


99,000 


Outer Irving 


25 


Irving at 20th Avenue 


113,232 


Noe Valley 


17 


2hth and Castro Streets 


51,000 


Portola 


15 


Felton Street 


35,500 


Mission 


72 


Hoff -Rondel Streets 


298,320 


Mission 


19 


2Uth and Capp Streets 


76,hOO 


Clement 


28 


8th Avenue, south 


155,500 




2FJ2 




$l,365,U52 



Pro,iects i Re-referred and Re-submitted : 6 



Inner Irving 


56 


Clement 


28 


Marina 


85 


North Beach 


108 


Excelsior 


18 


Excelsior 


32 




327 



9th- 10th Avenue 
9th Avenue, south 
Pierce Street 
Vallejo Street 
Mission (l) NE Mission 

and Excelsior 
Mission (2) Norton-Harrington 



$208,000 
116,800 
612,000 
51*2,2^9 

163,300 

126,000 

$l,76673li9 



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Honorable George Christopher, Mayor 
September 6, 1963 
Page 7 



Projects Re-referred and Under Study ? 1 3 



District 

Hai ght-Ashbury 

Geary 

Polk 



Parking 
Stalls 

32 

38 

126* 



G eneral Location 

Haight and Cole Streets 
l8th-l°th Avenues 
Sacramento Street 



Cost 

$173,000 
lU7,000 
32li,800 

$SHE, 800 



Projects Requiring New Site Recommendations, 

Primarily because of interim Changes in Original Use ; 6 



Bay View 


20 


Quesada Avenue 


$ 9,200 


Clement 


28 


6th Avenue 


7l,500 


Outer Irving 


Uo 


23rd Avenue 


213,000 


Portola 


22 


San Bruno Avenue 


ii7,000 


Mission 


36 


18th and Capp Streets 


15^,000 


Mission 


a 


Capp near 20th Street 


256,500 




222 




$751*, 200 



957 $a, 532, 801 

Policy Point No. h * Operation of completed facilities. 

Neither during the past nor at any time, has it been found necessary to 
resort to public operation of parking facilities provided under the San Francisco 
Parking Program. In all cases, operation has been entrusted to private lessees. 

However, unless assurances to the contrary are forthcoming from private 
operators, the neighborhood parking facilities are expected to be under public 
operation. 



follows: 



Accomplishments to date under the foregoing program may be summarized as 

!• Private Financing 
l) Completed: 



a) 1962-1963 

b) 19U9-1962 

c) Total 



8U3 stalls 
T<p32 " 



11) Total Under No. 1 



15,332 stalls 






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Honorable George Christopher, Mayor 
September 6, 1963 
Page 8 



2. Public-Private Financing 
1 ) Compl eted : 

a) 1962-1963 

b) 191+9-1962 

c) Total 

11) Under Development: 

a) 1962-1963 
111) Total under Wo. 2 

3. Public Financ ing 
1) Completed: 



800 stalls 
$.117 " 
5,917 " 



2,U26 stalls 



8,31+3 stalls 



) 1962-1963 
) 19U9-1962 



c) Total 
11) Under Development: 
a) 1962-1963 
111) Total under Wo. 3 
1+. GRAWD TOTAL 



586 stalls 
586 » 



1,000 stalls 

1,586 stalls 
25,261 stalls 



The actual and projected total cost of this program is approximately $55 
million of which, under the Parking Authority's program and policy, only about $9 
million will have required public financing; roughly only about 16% of the total. 

Parking Automobiles - The Major Objective 

Although the public parking program will be expanding rapidly during the 
next year, a very extensive parking service has already been extended to the 
motorists of San Francisco and the Bay Area, witness the following report of 
service rendered: 



Automobiles 
Parked 

Civic Center 
Auto Park 
opened 12/18/53 



Civic Center 
Plaza Garage 
opened 3/1/60 



Calendar Calendar 
Year Year 
1953-5U-55-56 1957-58-59-60 



Calendar 1st 6 mos. Grand Total 

Year Calendar ending 
1961-62 Year 1963 6/30/63__ 



96,801(5U) 
101,^33(55) 
113,025(56) 



128,317(57) 
121,01+0(58) 
110,1+03(58) 
116,760(60) 



153,757(60) 



112,808(61) 59,627 
113,992(62) 



281+,200(6l) 178,527 
338,153(62) 



1,075,119 



951,937 






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Honorable George ( 
September 6, 1963 
Fage 9 


Christopher, Mayor 








Automobiles 

Parked 


Calendar 
Years 
1953-5^-55-56 


Calendar 
Years 
1957-58-59-60 

252,899(58) 
768,857(59) 
8i43,597(60) 


Calendar 

Years 
1961-62 

816,957(61) 
999,659(62) 


1st 6 mos. 
Calendar 
Year 1963 

1*91,688 


Grand Total 
ending 
6/30/63 


Fifth and Mission 

Parking 

opened 8/28/58 


1*, 173,657 


Forest Hill 
Parking Plaza 
opened 7/57 




11,1*75(57) 
22,950(58) 

22,950(59) 
22,950(60) 


22,950(61) 
22,950(62) 


11,1*75** 


137,700 


Lakeside Village 
Parking Plaza 
opened 9/27/56 


12,000(56) 


57,500(57) 
57,500(58) 
57,500(59) 
57,500(60) 


57,500(61) 
57,500(62) 


28,750** 


385,750 


Marshall Square 
Auto Park 
opened 9/16/58) 




16,552(58) 
61,299(59) 
62,518(60) 


1*8,682(61) 
51,653(62) 


314,908 


275,612 


MIssion-Bartlett 
Parking Plaza 
opened 7/30/53 


92,1*83(53) 
238,852(510 
212,813(55) 
208,715(56) 


19l*,569(57) 
185,175(58) 
192,309(59) 
183,977(60) 


175,61*2(61) 

168,179(62) 


73,681 


1,926,395 


Portsmouth Square 

Garage 

opened 8/2l*/62 






68,151(62) 


130,957 


199,108 


St. Mary*s Square 

Garage 

opened 5/12/5U 


115,205(51*)* 

281,118(55) 

292,296(56) 


336,360(57) 

3814,661(58) 

39U,630(59) 
376,537(60) 


358,757(61) 

38)4,233(62) 


187,308 


3,111,105 


7th & Harrison 
Parking Plaza 
opened l*/58 




114,669(58) 
U2, 8143(59) 
1*2,581(60) 


10,020(61)*** 1*0,201* 
hh, 177(62) 


191*, 1*91* 


Sutter-Stockton 

Garage 

opened 11/19/61 




31*, 731(60) 
728,221(57) I 
1,055,10*6(58) : 
1,650,791(59) 
l,89l*,908(60) 

J,. 329. 366 ! 


1*85,3814(61) 
601*, 136(62) 


329,581* 


1,1*53,835 




93,396(53) 
1*50,858(51*) 
595,361*(55) 
626,036(56) 

1,765,651* 


2,372,900(61) 
2,853,083(62) 


1,566,709(63) 


Total 

Automobiles 

Parked 


5,225,983 


1.566,709 


13, 887*712 



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Honorable George Christopher 
September 6, 1963 
Rage 10 



RECAP ; 

Automobiles Parked 93,396(53) 
all projects U50, 858(510 

1953-51-55-56 $9$,36h(5$) 

626,036 (^6) 
1,765,651* 

Automobiles Parked 
all projects 
1957-58-59-60 



Automobiles Parked 
all projects 
1961-62 



Automobiles Parked 
all projects 
June 30, 1963 

GRAND TOTAL Automobiles Parked all projects 
to June 30, 1963, inclusive 



728,221(57) 

1,055,14*6(58) 
1,650,791(59) 
1,891*, 908 (60) 
5,329,366 



2,372,900(61) 
2,853,083(62) 

5,225,983 



1,566,709(63) 

13,887,712 






* Garage has no record of automobiles parked for May and June, 19514. 
■*# Estimated, as no actual count taken of this facility. 
**# Facility closed for repair for months of February, March, April, May, 
June, July, and August. Operation resumed on September 7, 1961. 

In addition, the parking at Candlestick Park special event parking 
area was as follows: 



Automobiles Parked 
Buses Parked 
Season Parking ($63) 



Fiscal Year 1962-63 

35U,977 

l*,i*65 

255 



For your additional information, we show: 
1. Revenues from public parking projects: 

1962-63 



Alameda York Parking Plaza* 
Income Received 
Taxes Received (1962-63) 
Taxes Received Total 



$ 
$" 



Total to 6/30/63 
$ 18,61*8.51* 
$ 18,61*8.51* 






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Honorable George Christopher, Mayor 
September 6, 1963 
Page 11 



1962-63 Total to 6/30/63 



Civic Center Auto Park 

Income Received $ 1*6,901.91* $390,706.19 

Taxes Received (1962-63) 988.89 

Taxes Received Total __ 16,072.12 

$ 1*7,890.83 $U06,778.31 

Forest Hill Parking Plaza 

Income Received $ 80l*.00 $ 1*, 821*. 00 



Taxes Received (1962-63) 
Taxes Received Total 



$ 801*. 00 $ h, 822*. 00 



Lakeside Village Parking Plaza 

Income Received $ 1,980.00 $ 13,365.00 

Taxes Received (1962-63) 
Taxes Received Total 



Taxes Received (1962-63) 
Taxes Received Total 



$ 1,980.00 $ 13,365.00 

Marshall Square Parking Plaza 

Income Received $ 30,567.1*2 $l31*,ll*5.23 

Taxes Received (1962-63) 892.05 

Taxes Received Total - 1,053.17 

$ 31,U59.ii7 $135,198.2*0 

Miss ion-Bart lett Parking Plaza 

Income Received $ 21*, 181*. 98 $222,558.23 

Taxes Received (1962-63) 282. $h 

Taxes Received Total - 1,61*6.69 

$ 224,1*67.52 $222*, 201*. 92 

St. Mary ! s Square Garage 

Income Received $ 30,561.21 $235,638.20 

Taxes Received (1962-63) 31, 1*81*. 5l 

Taxes Received Total - 287,1*27.39 

$ 62,01*5.72 $523,065.59 

7th & Harrison Parking Plaza 

Income Received $ 13, 881*. 00 $ 1*3,568.1*9 



$ 13, 881*. 00 $ 1*3,568.1*9 



GRAM) TOTAL 

Income Received $11*8,883.55 $1,063,1*53.88 

Taxes Received (1962-63) 33,61*7.99 

Taxes Received Total - 306,199.37 

$182,531.51* $1,369,653.25 









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Honorable George Christopher, Mayor 
September 6, 1963 
Page 12 

In addition, the following revenues have been received by the City 
from Candlestick Park Parking Plaza: 

1962-63 Total to 6/30/63 

Candlestick Park Parking Plaza 

Income Received $11*8,292.73 $819,685.07 
Taxes Received (1962-63) ii27.97 

Taxes Received Total - 3,93h.97 

$11*8, 720.70 $823, 620. 0U 

A further undetermined sum has been received from Union Square Garage. 

In the case of Fifth and Mission Garage, Civic Center Plaza Garage, 
Sutter-Stockton Garage and Portsmouth Square Garage, under the contract the rent 
payable to the City annually is an amount equal to 100$ of the net income after 
the payment of operating costs and debt service charges. (Portsmouth Square 
Garage is 103%.) 

*This was a temporary installation of 300 parking spaces at Seals 
Stadium for the Giants* baseball games furnished through the 
courtesy of Hamm Brewing Company. It was discontinued upon the 
opening of the new baseball stadium at Candlestick Park. 

2. Present status of 19U7 Parking Bond Fund: 

Original Bond Fund (authorized 19U7) $5,000,000.00 

Increment from Project Rents 332,367.01 
Increment from sale of Air Rights - 

St. Mary»s Square Garage 99,890.00 

Total Fund Accruals $5, li32, 257.01 

Appropriated to June 30, 1963 $5,318,992.90 

Unappropriated balance June 30, 1963 113, 26k. 11 



$5,U32,257.01 



Bonds outstanding June 30, 1963 $2,950,000.00 
Bonds redeemed 1962-63 $ 300,000.00 

Bond interest paid 1962-63 $ 71,787.50 






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Honorable George Christopher, Mayor 
September 6, 1963 
Page 13 

Parkinq Authority Projects 1 Balance Sheet 

I ■ i I i I i m i it* 1 - r i - -- -- — i - i - i - 

Gross Income from all projects (excluding Candlestick Park Parking 
Plaza and Union Square Garage) year ending June 30, 1963: 

Rent $lli8,883.55 

Taxes 33,61+7.99 

$l82,531.51i 

Costs and expenses 

Tax Roll Deduction $10l;,23l*.00 

Parking Authority Current Operating .1+2,102.00 

$ll+6, 336. 00 

MET INCOME $ 36,195.51* 

Information and Consultation Services 

Again, San Francisco's pre-eminent position and success in the emerging 
field of municipal parking is bringing it national - even international - recogni- 
tion and attention. This continues to invite a steadily increasing number of 
inquiries and personal visits from other cities and public officials to which 
the Authority staff and members have responded insofar as personnel and time 
limitations have permitted. 

In addition, a steadily increasing function of the Parking Authority 
has been the extension of parking information to local business associations, 
institutions, and neighborhood groups. 

Parking and Highways - Hope of the Future 

In his nationally syndicated column of August 26, 1963, Leslie Gould 
declared: 

"As the auto industry goes, so goes the economy," but warned, 

"There is plenty of room (expanding production) but the two 
major bottlenecks are: 

The jammed, inadequate highways, and 

The lack of off-street parking facilities, which is 
creating king sized traffic jams in the cities. " 
(emphasis added) 

Keenly conscious of this situation, the San Francisco Parking Authority 
has its sights on the future and is constantly planning an expanded parking 
program commensurate in scope with the expanding need. 



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Honorable George Christopher, Mayor 
September 6, 1963 
Page lii 

Acknowledgmen t 

The Parking Authority wishes to express its appreciation and to 
acknowledge the cooperation and assistance of yourself, the Chief Administrative 
Officer, members of the Board of Supervisors, the City Attorney, Controller, 
Director of Property, Director of Public Works, Director of Planning, City 
Engineer, the private garage industry, the public-spirited citizens comprising 
the corporations sponsoring many major projects, and others who have given so 
generously of their time and contributed so greatly to the advancement of its 
program during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 



PARKING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY 
AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

VinirigrT. Fisher 
Director 



VTF:he 
Encs. 









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: 



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F 
I 



ANNUAL REPORT 



ITS 

OCT 15 1964 



tflK.,^ 



QAR-y 



PARKING AUTHORITY 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1964 




OUTER IRVING PARKING PLAZA 

A typical unit in San Francisco's $4,500,000 
Neighborhood Shopping District Parking Program 



PARKING AUTHORITY 

ARTHUR S. BECKER, Chairman 

Wm. JACK CHOW 

DONALD MAGNIN 

JOHN E. SULLIVAN 

DAVID THOMSON 

Staff: 

VINING T. FISHER, Director 

THOMAS J. O' TOOLE, Secretary 



HONORABLE JOHN F. SHELLEY, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 



ft«[ 


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- ^ 


- 





450 McAllister street • room 603 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 94102 
KLondike 8-3651 



OF THE CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



JOHN F. SHELLEY, Mayor 



Highlights of San Francisco Parking Authority 
Annual Report to the Mayor 
for 
Fiscal Year ending June 30, 1961* 

#■ * # # * * ■* # ■«••**•*■ # •«■•«■ * * # tt -*■»■«■ *- * 



I. 26,013 new off-street parking spaces will have been completed with 
the construction of the Japanese Cultural Center and Golden Gateway 
Garages and the Neighborhood Shopping District parking facilities 
under the San Francisco Parking Authority parking program. 

II. $21,000,000 is the capital value of the five garages constructed 
under the Parking Authority municipal parking program since I9h9- 

The completion of the Japanese Cultural Center Garage and the Golden 
Gateway Garage will bring this total to approximately $31,000,000 . 

Over 8.000 automobiles may be parked in these seven municipally- 
owned garages at one time. 



III. 



Approximately 1<000 parking spaces , representing an investment of 
approximately $U,S>00,000 are in process of development in San 
Francisco f s neighborhood shopping districts at this time. 

Sixteen facilities, costing $3,052,971 have been approved to date, 



IV. San Francisco's municipally-owned parking facilities parked 1*. 1*50.136 
automobiles in fiscal 1963-1961* ; an increase of 1*.2$ over 1962-1963. 



V. Muni c i pal __re venue from 13 municipal parking projects for fiscal year 
1963-1961*: 



Gross revenue 

Rent and taxes received 
by City 



$1*,1*12,296.60 
$ 7l*S, 1*66.31* 



+6.99% 
+10# 



VI. Parking Authority Budget fiscal year 1963-1961*: $1*2,102.00; +$12.00 









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..■...-• 

' ' ' 

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' ' ' ' . 



THE PARKING AUTHORITY of the 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



JOHN F. SHELLEY. MAYOR 



450 McAllister street 

ROOM 403 



CITY HALL ANNEX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 94102 
HEmlock 1-2121, EXT 741 



ARTHURS. BECKER 
CHAIRMAN 

WM. JACK CHOW 
DONALD MAGNIN 
JOHN E. SULLIVAN 
DAVID THOMSON 



VIN1NGT. FISHER 
DIRECTOR 

THOMAS J. O'TOOLE 
SECRETARY 



September k, 196ix 



Honorable John F. Shelley, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 
200 City Hall 
San Francisco, California 9^102 

STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES OF THE PARKING AUTHORITY 

City and County of San Francisco 
Fiscal Year ending June 30, 1961j, 

Dear Mayor Shelley: 

The report of the Parking Authority for the fiscal year 1963-196U, together with 
supplemental information you have requested, is herewith respectfully submitted. 

The financial status is set forth in attached copies of the Authority's four (h) 
quarterly reports. 

PARKING AUTHORITY ORGANIZATION 

The San Francisco Parking Authority is composed of: 

Five Members appointed for four-year terms by the Mayor and 
approved by the Board of Supervisors. 

Staff composed of four members, consisting of the Director , 
Secretary to the Authority , and two Secretaries . 



PARKING AUTHORITY BUDGET 



1962-1963 
1963-196ii 
Past ten-year average 



$1*1,990 

$U2,102 

$m,£U9 



PARKING AUTHORITY FUNCTION 

The Parking Authority functions like a department of the City and County government 
and is directly responsible to the Mayor and the Board of Supervisors of the City 
and County of San Francisco. 






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Honorable John F. Shelley, Mayor 
Page 2 
September h, 19 6h 

In its present capacity, it is responsible for advising and making recommendations 
to the Mayor and Board of Supervisors on matters pertaining to the off-street 
parking program. Where required, the Authority also acts as an agent for the 
City and County government in carrying out off-street parking programs approved 
by the City administration. 

Function No. 1 : Investigative and recommendatory work required 
for the development of new off-street parking 
facilities throughout San Francisco. 

Function No. 2 : To make recommendation to the Mayor and Board of 
Supervisors regarding parking rates and charges 
and the operational procedures and regulations in 
force at each of the City and County off-street 
parking facilities for which it is responsible. 

POLICY, PROGRAM AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

The major accomplishments and activities of the Authority for the past year are 
shown below. These have been classified according to the Authority ! s policy and 
program adopted February 8, 1950. 

Policy Point No. 1 : Stimulation of and cooperation with private enterprise 

to finance and construct the facilities required under 
the off-street parking program. 

New parking facilities reported completed and 

placed in operation during fiscal year 1963-1961*: 829 stalls 

These additions brought the total of new off-street parking spaces 
provided under this phase of the Authority program since October 6, 
19ii9 to 16,161 stalls. 

Policy Point No. 2 ; Public cooperation with private enterprise to provide 

off-street parking by public provision of garage sites 
and private provision of the construction financing. 

Construction in this Category 

The following parking facilities have been financed and built as cooperative 
projects between the City and private business: 

Total 
Date Stall Construction Project 

Name Completed Capacity Land Cost Cost Cost 

St. Mary»s Square May 12, 828 $ 1*00,000 $2,300,000 $2,700,000 
Garage 1951* 

Fifth and Mission August 28, 1,083 $1,600,000 $2,135,000 $3,735,000 
Garage 1958 



Honorable John F. 

Page 3 

September li, 196k 


Shelley, Mayor 










Name 


Date 

Completed 


Capacity 


Land Cost 


Construction 
Cost 


Total 

Project 

Cost 


Fifth and Mission 
Garage Expansion 


November 21, 
1961 


500 


-0- 


$ 800,000 


$1,000,000 


Civic Center Plaza 
Garage 


March 1, 
I960 


l,ii6l 


-0- 


$1,500,000 


$U, 500,000 


Sut t e r-Stockton 
Garage 


November 19, 
I960 


932 


$2,550,000 


$3,680,000 


$6,230,000 


Portsmouth Square 
Garage 


August 2ii, 
1962 


800 


-0- 


$3,200,000 


$3,200,000 


Civic Center Auto 
Park 


December 18, 
1953 


276 


-0- 


$ 31,000 


$ 31,000 


Forest Hill 
Parking Plaza 


July, 1957 


13 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 



Under Construction or Planned 
in this Category 

The following garage construction has been under development in this category. 

Japanese Cultural Center Underground Garage 

This project is under joint development by National Braemar, Inc., the 
City of San Francisco Western Addition Parking Corporation, the San 
Francisco Redevelopment Agency, and the Parking Authority, subject to 
official approval of the City, It is reported that necessary and 
essential financing has finally been completed by the Corporation, and 
construction is expected to begin in late 196U, subject to approvals. 

Present estimates indicate the following physical and financial facts 
for this project: 

Location: Sub-surface of the three city-block area bounded 
by Geary, Post, Laguna and Fillmore Streets 



Capacity: Self parking 

Attendant parking 



800 stalls 
1,100 stalls 



Size: One complete and one partial (2/3) underground levels 

Land cost: $256,6[tO 

Estimated construction cost: $3,750,000 

Operation: Self-parking; attendant parking optional 



- 



Honorable John F. Shelley, Mayor 

Page h 

September h, 196Ii 

Japanese Cultural Center Underground Garage (contd.) 

Proposed Rate Schedule: 25^ 1 hour 

$1.50 maximum to 6:00 P. M. 
$2.50 maximum 2h hours 

Proposed Rate Schedule: Under rates comparable to those 
(Unit B on Fillmore Street) of the Neighborhood Parking Program, 

This area will eventually become a section of the planned Neighborhood 
Program. 

Golden Gateway Underground Garage 

This project is under joint development by the City of San Francisco 
Golden Gateway Parking Corporation, Perini-San Francisco Associates, 
the Srn Francisco Redevelopment Agency, and the Parking Authority, 
also subject to official approval by the City. 

Location: Sub- surface of the two City-block area bounded 
by Washington, Clay, Davis and Battery Streets 

Capacity: Self parking 1,326 stalls 

Size: h60,Ui6 square feet comprising three or four underground 
levels to be determined 

Land cost: $1,090,000 

Estimated construction cost: $li,036,61i2 

Operation: Self parking 

Proposed rate schedule: 50c 1 first hour 

35^ each additional hour 

The capacity of the foregoing off-street parking projects completed or under 
development jointly by government and private business under the Parking Authority 
program to date totals 8,Oli3 parking stalls . 

Policy Point No. 3 : Direct public financing and construction, including site 

acquisition, where private construction was not or could 
not be undertaken. 

The 8,500 special event parking stalls at Candlestick Park are considered a 
special case and are not carried as an increment of the general parking program. 

Past construction under this category consists of: 

Mission-Bartlett Parking Plaza 250 stalls 
Lakeside Village Parking Plaza h$ stalls 
7th and Harrison Parking Plaza 270 stalls 

569 stalls 



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', • ' -, .. . 



Honorable John F. Shelley, Mayor 

Page 5 

September h, l°61i 

Policy Point Mo. 3 (contd.) 

Neighborhood Shopping District Parking Facilities 

The basic parking program adopted by the Parking Authority on August 31, 
1961, for the neighborhood shopping districts of the City will be a 
major addition to parking facilities provided under this category of 
direct public financing and construction. 

The program comprises: 

21 public parking lots, and 
h public parking garages, in 
15 neighborhood shopping districts, with 
923 parking stall total capacity, for 
$U, 391, 171 estimated approximate cost 

Thus far all properties have been acquired for the Eureka Valley Parking 
Plaza No. 1, Noe Valley Parking Plaza, Outer Irving Parking Plaza, and 
West Portal Parking Plaza No. 1. Definite commitments have been 
received in other areas. The Authority, at all times, has done every- 
thing possible to alleviate hardship on families and owners of business 
whose properties have been required for such public use. 

Under completion of the Neighborhood Parking Program, the number and 
capacity of parking facilities constructed under this category will be: 

Number of facilities 28 

Number of parking stalls 1,^92 

Financing Time Schedule 

1. The Controller of the City and County of San Francisco has estimated 
that the basic program can be financed in its entirety from monies 
now on deposit in our "Off -Street Parking Fund," plus the estimated 
increments which will be realized up to July 1, 1967 . These are 
accruing from parking meter revenues at the rate of $525,000 a year. 

2. The Neighborhood Program, providing off-street parking facilities 
in these neighborhood districts, is as follows: 

Projects approved to date : 16 

Parking 
District Stalls General Location Cost 

Eureka Valley 21 Castro Street $ 98,000. 

Eureka Valley 21 Collingwood Street 128,600 

West Portal ' 22 West Portal Avenue 160,200 

West Portal 20 Claremont-Ulloa Streets 172,100 

Geary 22 Geary Boulevard 102,000 



■ 






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Honorable John F. Shelley, Mayor 

Page 6 

September h, 1961; 



Projects approved to date (contd.) ; 16 





Parking 






District 


Stalls 
25 


General Location 


Cost 


Outer Irving 


Irving at 20th Avenue 


$ 113,232 


Noe Valley 


17 


2lith Street 


53,900 


Port ola 


15 


Felton Street 


hh, 800 


Mission 


72 


Hoff -Rondel Streets 


308,000 


Mission 


19 


2hth and Capp Streets 


76,UOO 


Clement 


28 


8th Avenue 


165,300 


Clement* 


28 


9th Avenue 


120,500 


Marinas- 


85 


Pierce Street 


612,000 


North Beach* 


108 


Vallejo Street 


5ii2,2U9 


Excelsior* 


32 


Norton-Harri ngton 


130,970 


Inner Irving* 


Ji2 


8th-9th Avenues 


22U,720 




575 




$3,052,971 



*Project development advanced from "Projects Reref erred and 
Resubmitted" to "Projects Approved to Date" this year. 

Projects re referred, and resubmitted : 1_ 

Geary 38 l8th-19th Avenues 

Projects, rereferred and under study ; 2 



Haight-Ashbury 
Polk 



32 

88 



Haight and Cole Streets 
Sacramento Street 



Projects requiring new site recommendations, 
primarily because of interim changes in original use 



Quesada Avenue 

6th Avenue 

23rd Avenue 

San Bruno Avenue 

18th and Capp Streets 

Capp near 20th Street 



Bay View 


20 


Clement 


28 


Outer Irving 


hP 


Porto la 


22 


Mission 


38 


Mission 


7h 



$ 115,000 



$ 160,000 
309,000 

$ 1*69,000 



$ 



222 



9,200 

7U,500 

213,000 

ii7,000 

1 $h, 000 

256,500 



$ 75h,200 



923 



$Iu391,171 



. 



■ • 



Honorable John F. Shelley, Mayor 

Page 7 

September 1*, 1961* 



Accomplishments to date under the foregoing program may be summarized as follows: 
1. Private financing 



1) Completed: 

a) 1963-1961* 

b) 191*9-1963 

c) Total 

11) Total under No. 1 

2. Public-private financing 
1) Completed: 

a) 1963-1961 

b) 191*9-1963 

c) Total 

11) Under development: 
a) 1963-1961; 
111) Total under No. 2 

3. Public financing 
l) Completed: 

a) 1963-1961* 

b) 19U9-1963 

c) Total 

11) Under development: 

a) 1963-1961* 
111) Total under No. 3 
1*. GRAND TOTAL 



829 stalls 
15,332 » 
16,161 " 



800 stalls 
^917 " 



2,1*26 stalls 



>86 stalls 

H 



923 stalls 



16,161 stalls 



8,31*3 stalls 



1,509 stalls 
26,013 stalls 



The actual and projected total cost of this program is approximately $55 million 
of which, under the Parking Authority's program and policy, only about $9 million 
will have required public financing; roughly only about 16% of the total. 



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Honorable John F. Shelley, Mayor 
Page 10 
September h, 196ij. 



PRESENT STATUS OF 19l*7 PARKINS BOND FUND 

Original Bond Fund (authorized 191*7) $5,000,000.00 
Increment from Project Rents 1*69,735.15 

Increment from sale of Air Rights - 

St. Mary»s Square Garage 99.890.00 

Total Fund Accruals $5,569,625.15 



Appropriated to June 30, 1961* $5,132,257.01 

Unappropriated balance June 30, 1961* 137,368.11* 



$ 5,569,625.15 



Bonds outstanding June 30, 1961* $2,600,000.00 

Bonds redeemed 1963-1961* $ 350,000.00 

Bond interest paid 1963-1961* $ 66,218.75 

ACKNOWLEDGMENT 

The Parking Authority wishes to express its appreciation and to acknowledge the 
cooperation and assistance of yourself, the Chief Administrative Officer, members 
of the Board of Supervisors, the City Attorney, Controller, Director of Property, 
Director of Public Works, Director of Planning, City Engineer, the private garage 
industry, the public-spirited citizens comprising the corporations sponsoring many 
major projects, and others who have given so generously of their time and contributed 
so greatly to the advancement of its program during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

PARKING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY 
AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



By 

Vining T. Fisher 
Director 

VTF:he 
Encs. 



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Nov 8 



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PL**' 1 



|NNI)AL REPORT 




^ARKING AUTHORITY 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 




PY>Z 



WEST FORTAL PARKING PLAZA NO. 1 



Primnl e*te*r\ nnit-c in ?an Pranrisfn's <K4 ^00 000 



PARKING AUTHORITY 

ARTHUR S. BECKER, Chairman 

Wm. JACK CHOW 

DONALD MAGNIN 

JOHN E. SULLIVAN 

DAVID THOMSON 

Staff: 

VINING T. FISHER, Director 

THOMAS J. O'TOOLE, Secretary 



HONORABLE JOHN F. SHELLEY, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 



THE PARKING AUTHORITY of the 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



JOHN F. SHELLEY, MAYOR 



4so McAllister street 

ROOM 603 



September 7, 1965 



CITY HALL ANNEX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 94102 

KLondike 8-3651 



MEMBERS: 

ARTHUR S. BECKER 
CHAIRMAN 

WM. JACK CHOW 
DONALD MAGNIN 
JOHN E. SULLIVAN 
DAVID THOMSON 



VININGT. FISHER 
DIRECTOR 

THOMAS J. O'TOOLE 
SECRETARY 



Honorable John F, Shelley, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 
200 City Hall 
San Francisco, California 94102 

STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES OF THE PARKING AUTHORITY 
City and County of San Francisco 
Fiscal Year ending June 30 ( 1965 

Dear Mayor Shelley: 

The report of the Parking Authority for the fiscal year 1964-1965, together with 
supplemental information you have requested, is herewith respectfully submitted. 

The financial status is set forth in attached copies of the Authority's four (4) 
quarterly reports. 

PARKING AUTHORITY ORGANIZATION 

The San Francisco Parking Authority is composed of: 

Five Members appointed for four-year terms by the Mayor and 
approved by the Board of Supervisors. 

Staff composed of four members, consisting of the Director . 
Secretary to the Authority , and two Secretaries . 

PAR KING AUTHOR ITY BUDGET 
1963-1964 $42,102 

1964-1965 $44,215 

Past ten-year average $41 » 992 



PARKING AUTHO RITY FUNCTION 

The Parking Authority functions like a department of the City and County government 
and is directly responsible to the Mayor and the Board of Supervisors of the City 
and County of San Francisco. 



i 






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Honorable John F. Shelley, Mayor 

Page 2 

September 7. 1965 



In its present capacity, it is responsible for advising and making recommendations 
to the Mayor and Board of Supervisors on matters pertaining to the off-street 
parking program. Where required, the Authority also acts as an agent for the 
City and County government in carrying out off-street parking programs approved 
by the City administration. 

Function No. 1 ; Investigative and recommendatory work required 
for the development of new off-street parking 
facilities throughout San Francisco. 

Function No. 2 : To make recommendation to the Mayor and Board of 
Supervisors regarding parking rates and charges 
and the operational procedures and regulations in 
force at each of the City and County off-street 
parking facilities for which it is responsible. 

POLICY. , PROGRAM AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

The major accomplishments and activities of the Authority for the past year are 
shown below. These have been classified according to the Authority's policy and 
program adopted February 8, 1950. 

Policy Point No. 1 ; Stimulation of and cooperation with private enterprise 

to finance and construct the facilities required under 
the off-street parking program. 

New parking facilities reported 

completed and placed in operation 

during fiscal year 1964-I965: 867 stalls 

These additions brought the total of new off-street 
parking spaces provided under this phase of the 
Authority program since October 6, 1949 to 17,028 
stalls 

Policy Point No. 2 t Public cooperation with private enterprise to provide 

off-street parking by public provision of garage sites 
and private provision of the construction financing. 

Construction in this Category 

The following parking facilities have been financed and built as cooperative 
projects between the City and private business: 



. 









• ■ 



Honorable John P. Shelley, Mayor 

Page 3 

September 7, 1965 



Name 


Date 
Completed 

May 12, 
1954 


Stall 

Capacity 

828 


Land Cost 
$ 400,000 


Construction 
Cost 


Total 

Project 

Cost 


St. Mary's Square 
Garage 


$2,300,000 


$2,700,000 


Fifth and Mission 
Garage 


August 28, 
1958 


938 


$1,600,000 


$2,135,000 


$3,735,000 


Fifth and Mission 
Garage Expansion 


November 21, 
1961 


534 


-0- 


$ 800,000 


$1,000,000 


Civic Center Plaza 
Garage 


March 1, 
I960 


1,461 


-0- 


$4,500,000 


$4,500,000 


Sutter-Stockton 
Garage 


November 19, 
I960 


932 


$2,550,000 


$3,680,000 


$6,230,000 


Portsmouth Square 
Garage 


August 24, 
1962 


800 


-0- 


$3,200,000 


$3,200,000 


Civic Center Auto 
Park 


December 18, 
1953 


276 


-0- 


$ 31,000 


$ 31,000 


Forest Hill 
Parking Plaza 


July, 1957 


13 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 






Under Construction in this Category 

The following garage is under construction in this category: 

Golden Gateway Underground Garage 

This project is under joint development by the City of San Francisco 
Golden Gateway Parking Corporation, Golden Gateway Center, the San 
Francisco Redevelopment Agency, and the Parking Authority. 

Location: Sub-surface of the two City-block area bounded by 
Washington, Clay, Davis and Battery Streets. 

Capacity: Self-parking 1,326 stalls 

Size: 460,446 square feet comprising three levels. 

Land cost: $1,090,000 

Estimated total cost, subject to final audit: $7,090,000 

Operation: Self parking 

Proposed rate schedule: 500 first hour 

350 each additional hour 



Honorable John F. Shelley, Mayor 

Page 4 

September 7, 1965 



Japanese Cultural Center Underground Garage 

This project is under joint development by National-Braemar, Inc., the 
City of San Francisco Western Addition Parking Corporation, the San 
Francisco Redevelopment Agency, and the Parking Authority, subject to 
official approval of the City. It is reported that necessary and 
essential financing has finally been completed by the Corporation, and 
construction is expected to begin in late 1965 » subject to approvals. 

Present estimates indicate the following physical and financial facts 
for this project: 

Location: Sub-surface of the three city-block area bounded 
by Geary, Post, Laguna and Fillmore Streets. 

Capacity: Self parking - 800 stalls 

Attendant parking - 1,100 stalls 

Size: Two garages, one of two levels and one a single level. 

Land cost: $256,640 

Estimated construction cost: $3 » 750 1 000 

Operation: Self parking; attendant parking optional. 

Proposed Rate Schedule: 250 1 hour 

Si. 50 maximum to 6:00 P. M. 
$2.50 maximum 24 hours 

Proposed Rate Schedule: Under rates comparable to those of the 
(Unit B on Fillmore Neighborhood Parking Program. 
Street) 

This area will eventually become a section 
of the Neighborhood Program. 

The capacity of the foregoing off-street parking project completed or under 
development jointly by government and private business under the Parking Authority 
program to date totals 8.208 parking stalls . 

Policy Point No. 3 : Direct public financing and construction, including site 

acquisition, where private construction was not or could 
not be undertaken. 

The 8,500 special event parking stalls at Candlestick Park are considered a 
special case and are not carried as an increment of the general parking program. 



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Honorable John F. Shelley, Mayor 

Page 5 

September 7, 1965 



Past construction under this category consists of: 

Mission-Bartlett Parking Plaza 250 stalls 
Lakeside Village Parking Plaza 49 stalls 
7th and Harrison Parking Plaza 270 stalls 

569 stalls 

Neighborhood Shopping District Parking Facilities 

The basic parking program adopted by the Parking Authority on August 3>1 1 1961, 
for the neighborhood shopping districts of the City will be a major addition to 
parking facilities provided under this category of direct public financing and 
construction. 

The program comprises: 

21 public parking lots, and 

4 public parking garages, in 
15 neighborhood shopping districts, with 
919 parking stall total capacity, for 
#4»573i971 estimated approximate cost. 

Thus far all properties have been acquired for the Eureka Valley Parking Plaza 
No. 1, West Portal Parking Plaza No. 1, Geary Boulevard Parking Plaza No. 1, 
Outer Irving Parking Plaza, Noe Valley Parking Plaza, Portola Parking Plaza 
No. 1, and Sixteenth-Hoff Parking Plaza, and these facilities are in operation. 
Definite commitments have been received in other areas. The Authority at all 
times has done everything possible to alleviate hardship on families and owners 
of business whose properties have been required for such public use. 

Under completion of the Neighborhood Parking Program, the number and capacity of 
parking facilities constructed under this category will be: 

Number of facilities 28 

Number of parking stalls Ii492 

Financing Time Schedule: 

1. The Controller of the City and County of San Francisco has 
estimated that the basic program can be financed in its entirety 
from monies now on deposit in our "Off-Street Parking Fund," plus 
the estimated increments which will be realized up to July 1, 
1967. These are accruing from parking meter revenues at the 
rate of approximately $> 525*000 a year. 

2. The Neighborhood Program, providing off-street parking facilities 
in these neighborhood districts, is as follows: 






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: 






Honorable John P. Shelley, Mayor 

Page 6 

September 7, 1965 






Projects approved 


to date: 17 




Parking 


District 


Stalls 


Eureka Valley 


21 


Eureka Valley 


21 


West Portal 


21 


West Portal 


20 


Geary 


22 


Geary 


38 


Outer Irving 


25 


Noe Valley 


16 


Porto la 


15 


Mission 


72 


Mission 


20 


Clement 


33 


Clement 


28 


Marina 


86 


North Beach 


99 


Excelsior 


32 


Inner Irving 


JSL 



General Location 

Castro Street 
Collingwood Street 
West Portal Avenue 
Claremont-Ulloa Streets 
Geary Boulevard 
18th-19th Avenues 
Irving at 20th Avenue 
24th Street 
Felton Street 
Hoff -Rondel Streets 
24th and Capp Streets 
8th Avenue 
9th Avenue 
Pierce Street 
Vallejo Street 
Norton-Harrington 
8th-9th Avenues 



602 

Projects re-referred and under study : 2 



Haight-Ashbury 
Polk 



32 

88 



Haight and Cole Streets 
Sacramento Street 



Projects requiring new site recommendations, 
primarily because of interim changes in 
original use: 6 



Cost 

$ 80,000 

128,600 

160,200 

172,100 

102,000 

115,000 

113,232 

53,900 

44,800 

308,000 

76,400 

165,300 

120,500 

612,000 

542,249 
130,970 
224.720 

S 5. 149, 971 



$ 160,000 
509,800 

$ 469 . 800 



Bay View 


20 


Quesada Avenue 


% 9,200 


Clement 


28 


6th Avenue 


74,500 


Outer Irving 


40 


23rd Avenue 


213,000 


Porto la 


22 


San Bruno Avenue 


47,000 


Mission 


38 


18th and Capp Streets 


154,000 


Mission 


JA 


Capp near 20th Street 


256,500 



222 



S 754.200 



212 



$A*ZLhm 









, 



■ 



,£ : 



■ 



Honorable John F. Shelley, Mayor 

Page 7 

September 7, 1965 



Accomplishments to date under the foregoing program may be summarized as follows: 
1. Private financing 



l) Completed: 

a) 1964-1965 

b) 1949-1964 

c) Total 

11) Total Under No. 1 

2. Public-private financing 
l) Completed: 

a) 1964-1965 

b) 1949-1964 

c) Total 

11) Under development: 
e) 1964-1965 
111) Total under No. 2 

3. Public financing 



867 stalls 
16.161 " 
17,028 » 



5.782 stalls 
5,782 » 



2,426 stalls 



17,028 stalls 



8,208 stalls 



1) 


Completed: 








a) 1964-1965 

b) 1949-1964 

c) Total 


192 stalls 
569 " 
761 " 




11) 


Under development: 








a) 1964-1965 


727 stalls 




111) 


Total under No. 3 




1,488 stalls 


4. GRAND TOTAL 




26J24 stalls 



The actual and projected total cost of this program is approximately $55 million, 
of which, under the Parking Authority's program and policy, only about $9 million 
will have required public financing; roughly only about 16% of the total. 






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Honorable John F. Shelley, Mayor 
Page 12 
September 7» 1965 



PRESENT gTATUS OF 19 47 PARKI NG BO ND FU ND 

Original Bond Fund (authorized 1947) $5,000,000.00 

Increment from Project Rents 631,693.83 
Increment from sale of Air Rights - 

St. Mary's Square Garage 99.890.00 

Total Fund Accruals & 5. 751. 585. 85 

Appropriated to June 30, 1965 $5,569,625.15 

Unappropriated balance June 30, 1965 161.958. 68 

$5.751.585.85 

Bonds outstanding June 30, 1965 $2,240,000.00 

Bonds redeemed 1964-1965 $ 360,000.00 

Bond interest paid 1964-1965 $ 58,512.00 

ACIQIOWLEDGMENT 

The Parking Authority wishes to express its appreciation and to acknowledge the 
cooperation and assistance of yourself, the Chief Administrative Officer, members 
of the Board of Supervisors, the City Attorney, Controller, Director of Property, 
Director of Public Works, Director of Planning, City Engineer, the private garage 
industry, the public-spirited citizens comprising the corporations sponsoring many 
major projects, and others who have given so generously of their time and 
contributed so greatly to the advancement of its program during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

PARKING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY 
AND COUNTY OF SAjKFRANCISCO 




Vining Tf Fisher 
Director 




VTF:he 
Encs. 




UNION SQUARE GARAGE 



SUTTER-STOCKTON GARAGE 



DOCUMENTS 

OCT -3 1966 
P ^fc R «& 



ANNUAL REPORT 





1965-66 





PORTSMOUTH SQUARE GARAGE 





FIFTH 6. MISSION GARAGE 



-1-. SS 




CIVIC CENTER PLAZA GARAGE 



PARKING AUTHORITY 

riiJ^Q r* *.. ~t c c : 



PARKING AUTHORITY 

DONALD MAGNIN, Chairman 

HARRY J. ALEO 

ARTHUR S. BECKER 

FRANCIS H. LOUIE 

DAVID THOMSON 

Staff: 
VINING T. FISHER, Director 



HONORABLE JOHN F. SHELLEY, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 




August 15, 1966 



Honorable John P. Shelley 

Mayor of San Francisco 

200 City Hall 

San Francisco, California 94102 

Dear Mayor Shelley: 

For the sixteenth successive year, your Parking Authority is pleased to 
report continued and substantial progress toward the realization of its 
objectives. 

Notwithstanding the fact that major changes occurred in both Staff and 
Commissioner personnel, the work of the Parking Authority was transacted 
without undue delay or hardship. 

During the year just ended, the Authority experienced the untimely demise 
of its Secretary, Thomas J. 0' Toole. It is to his memory that this report 
is respectfully dedicated. 

The Honorable Francis H. Louie was appointed Commissioner on April 14, 
1966 to fill the vacancy created by the resignation of the Honorable 
William Jack Chow. 

Soon thereafter, the Honorable Harry J. Aleo was appointed to replace the 
Honorable John E. Sullivan. Mr. Sullivan was a member of the Authority 
for 9 years, and his valuable counsel, work and guidance will be sorely 
missed. He spearheaded the Neighborhood Parking Program during his tenure 
as a Commissioner, and the 11 neighborhood lots already in operation are 
evidence of the outstanding manner in which he performed his job. 

Subsequent to the close of the fiscal year I965-I966, the Authority was 
advised by Vining T. Fisher, Director, that he found it necessary to apply 
for sick leave and to retire from the Authority subsequent to the expiration 
of such sick leave. 

The Authority was most fortunate in having available as a ready replacement 
for Mr. Fisher the most able Arthur S. Becker who resigned as a Parking 
Authority Commissioner on July 15, 1966 and was subsequently appointed 
Acting Director on July 18, 1966. Mr. Becker will become the Director 
upon the retirement of Mr. Fisher. 

Within the last week the Honorable Frank J. Gallagher was appointed to the 
Authority, assuming the position made vacant by Mr. Becker. 

In view of the many changes which took place during the just-completed year, 
the orderly conduct of business would have been impossible were it not that 
the Authority had the fullest measure of cooperation from its secretarial 
staff. Our thanks and appreciation go to Miss Helen Ellis and Miss Helen 
Juzix for their efficient assistance in the conduct of the work of the 
Authority during the various and frequent periods of transition. 

Lastly, I wish to extend to you and the Board of Supervisors our profound 
and sincere appreciation for your cooperation and patient indulgence 
during what was a year of significant change. 

As we enter the new year, the Parking Authority will continue to address 
itself to parking needs, both current and future. During the year we 
anticipate the opening of additional neighborhood parking lots and the 
Golden Gateway Garage. In addition, we will soon receive the results of 
a year-long survey of downtown parking demands. This report will provide 
the information necessary to the proper planning of future downtown 
parking facilities. 



Re^ictfully 

Donald Magnin 
Chairman 





THE PARKING AUTHORITY 

MEMBERS: 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO donald magnin 

CHAIRMAN 

450 MCALLISTER STREET — ROOM 603 
SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 94102 HARRY J. ALEO 

(415) 558-3651 



FRANK J. GALLAGHER 
FRANCIS H. LOUIE 



JOHN F. SHELLEY, MAYOR DAVID THOMSON 

• • 

ARTHUR S. BECKER 
DIRECTOR 

STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES OP THE PARKING AUTHORITY 
City and County of San Francisco 
Fiscal Year ending June 50, 1966 

The report of the Parking Authority for the fiscal year 1965-1966, together with 
supplemental information you have requested, is herewith respectfully submitted. 

The financial status is set forth in attached copies of the Authority's four (4) 
quarterly reports, 

PARKING AUTHORITY ORGANIZATION 

The San Francisco Parking Authority is composed of: 

Five Members appointed for four-year terms by the Mayor 
and approved by the Board of Supervisors. 

Staff composed of four members, consisting of the Director , 
Secretary to the Authority , and two Secretaries . 

PARKING AUTHORITY BUDGET 
1964-1965 #44,215 

1965-1966 $46,784 

Past ten-year average $42,859 

PARKING AUTHORITY FUNCTION 

The Parking Authority functions like a department of the City and County government 
and is directly responsible to the Mayor and the Board of Supervisors of the City 
and County of San Francisco. 

In its present capacity, it is responsible for advising and making recommendations 
to the Mayor and Board of Supervisors on matters pertaining to the off-street 
parking program. Vfaere required, the Authority also acts as an agent for the 
City and County government in carrying out off-street parking programs approved 
by the City administration. 

Function No. 1 ; Investigative and recommendatory work required 
for the development of new off-street parking 
facilities throughout San Francisco, 



;■!.-. 



' 






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. ■ .... ■ 









-. • - •- 



. 






... 










. . ■ 



. 



. 



... 



•' 



' ' 



■ 



Page 2 

September 8, 1966 



Function No* 2 ; To make recommendation to the Mayor and Board 
of Supervisors regarding parking rates and 
charges and the operational procedures and 
regulations in force at each of the City and 
County off-street parking facilities for which 
it is responsible. 



POLICY. PROGRAM AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

The major accomplishments and activities of the Authority for the past year are 
shown below. These have been classified according to the Authority's policy and 
program adopted February 8, 1950. 

Policy Point No. 1 ; Stimulation of and cooperation with private enterprise 

to finance and construct the facilities required under 
the off-street parking program. 

New parking facilities reported 

completed and placed in operation 

during fiscal year 1965-1966: l,86l stalls 

These additions brought the total 

of new off-street parking spaces 

provided under this phase of the 

Authority program since October 6, 

1949, to 18.889 stalls 

Policy Point No. 2 : Public cooperation with private enterprise to provide 

off-street parking by public provision of garage sites 
and private provision of the construction financing. 

Construction in this Category 



The following paa 
projects between 

Name 


:king facilities have been financed and 
the City and private business: 

Date Stall 
Completed Capacity Land Cost 

December 18, 276 -0- 
1953 


built as cooperative 

Total 
Construction Project 
Cost Cost 


Civic Center 
Auto Park 


$ 31,000 


$ 31,000 


St. Mary's Sq. 
Garage 


May 12, 
1954 


828 


$ 400,000 


$2,300,000 


$2, 700,000 


Forest Hill 
Parking Plaza 


July 1, 
1957 


13 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 









• 









.. ' • . . .'•■■' 



: 






I 



■ 






■ 



. 






- 









. 



Page 3 

September 8, 1966 












Name 


Date 
Completed 

August 5» 
1957 


Stall 
Capacity 

750 


Land Cost 
-0- 


Construction 
Cost 


Total 
Project 
Cost 


Ellis-O'Farrell 
Garage 


-0- 


$3,650,000* 


Fifth and Mission 
Garage 


August 28, 
1958 


938 


£1,600,000 


$2,135,000 


$3,735,000 


Civic Center 
Plaza Garage 


March 1, 
I960 


1,461 


-0- 


$4,500,000 


$4,500,000 


Sutter-Stockton 
Garage 


November 19 , 
I960 


932 


$2,550,000 


$3,680,000 


$6,230,000 


Fifth and Mission 
Garage Expansion 


November 21, 
1961 


534 


-0- 


$ 800,000 


$1,000,000 


Portsmouth Square 


August 24 , 


800 


-0- 


$3,200,000 


$3,200,000 



Garage 1962 

* Privately financed and operated until July 20, 1965, at which time it reverted 
to the City. 

Under Construction in this Category 

The following garages are under construction in this category: 

Golden Gateway Underground Garage 

This project is under joint development by the City of San Francisco 
Golden Gateway Parking Corporation, Golden Gateway Center, the San 
Francisco Redevelopment Agency and the Parking Authority. It is 
nearing completion and is expected to open October 1, 1966. 

Location: Sub-surface of the two City-block area bounded 
by Washington, Clay, Davis and Battery Streets 

Capacity: Self -parking 1,326 stalls 

Size: 460,446 square feet comprising three levels 

Land cost: $1,090,000 

Estimated total cost, 

subject to final audit: $7,090,000 

Operation: Self parking 

Proposed 

rate schedule: 50# first hour 

350 each additional hour 
$1.75 maximum (up to 24 hours) 






■ 

■ 



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" • . :. do: 

■ 

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"' " '; ' '■ ''••-- 



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■- 

■ .:....- . •'•■ 



Page 4 

September 8, 1966 



Japanese Cultural Center Underground Garage 

This project is under joint development by National-Braemar, Inc. , 
the City of San Francisco Western Addition Parking Corporation, 
the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency, and the Parking Authority, 
subject to official approval of the City. Construction began 
November 3» 1965 » and approximately 40% had been completed by the 
end of June, 1966. Completion is estimated by the end of 1966. 

Present estimates indicate the following physical and financial 
facts for this project: 

Location: Sub-surface of the three City-block area bounded 
by Geary, Post, Laguna and Fillmore Streets 

Capacity: Self parking - 800 stalls 

Attendant parking - 1,100 stalls 

Size: Two garages, one of two levels and one a single 
level 

Land cost: $256,640 



Estimated 
construction cost: 



S3, 750, 000 



Operation: Self parking; attendant parking optional 



Proposed Rate Schedule : 



6 PM to Midnight - 



Midnight to 7 AM - 



Fillmore Merchants 
Validation stamps: 

Monthly rates - 

Proposed Rate Schedule : 
(Unit B on Fillmore 
Street) 



25^ first hour 

250 each additional hour 

$1.50 maximum to 6 PM 

500 first two hours 

250 each additional hour 

Si. 00 maximum to midnight 

500 first two hours 

250 each additional hour 

Si. 00 maximum to 7 AM 

S2.50 maximum 10-24 hours 



100 each 
Books of 500 
S25 to ^il30 



S50.00 per book 



Under rates comparable to those 
of the Neighborhood Parking 
Program. This area will eventually 
become a section of the Neighborhood 
Program. 



. 



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Page 5 

September 8, 1966 

Fifth and Mission Gaxage Expansion II 

This project is under joint development by the City of San Francisco 
Downtown Parking Corporation and the Parking Authority, subject to 
approval by the City. The Letter of Intent and Agreement for financing, 
acquisition and construction of the addition have been approved. Start 
of construction is dependent upon acquisition of the property by the 
Redevelopment Agency. 

Present estimates indicate the following physical and financial facts: 

Location: From present terminus on Mission Street to 
Fourth and Minna Streets 

Size: Approximately 24*000 square feet 

Additional 

parking stalls: 296 

Total 

parking stalls: 1,879 

Estimated cost of land acquisition, 

demolition and site preparation: $880,000 

Estimated construction cost: $725>000 

Contractor: Donald M. Drake Co., Portland, Oregon 

Engineers: H. J. Degenkolb & Associates 

Operator: City of San Francisco Downtown Parking Corporation 

Management: S. E. Onorato, Inc. 

Operation: Self-parking 

Parking Rates: 150 each hour 

$1.25 maximum (24 hours) 
$17.50 monthly 

The capacity of the foregoing off-street parking projects completed or under 
development jointly by government and private business under the Parking 
Authority program to date totals 9»254 parking stalls . 



Policy Point No. 5 : Direct public financing and construction, including site 

acquisition, where private construction was not or could 
not be undertaken. 

The 8,500 special event parking stalls at Candlestick Park are considered a 
special case and are not carried as an increment of the general parking pro- 
gram. 






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Page 6 

September 8, 1966 



Past construction under this category consists of: 

Mission-Bartlett Parking Plaza 250 stalls 

♦Lakeside Village Parking Plaza 49 stalls 

7* and Harrison Parking Plaza 270 stalls 

569 stalls 

* The City originally acquired the sites for these two neighborhood lots 
located at Ocean Avenue and Junipero Serra Boulevard, and Ocean Avenue and 
Nineteenth Avenue; constructed parking lots thereon and leased them to the 
Lakeside Village Merchants' Association for a period of twenty years, 
commencing October 1, 1956. On January 28, 1965, the Merchants' Association 
requested the City and County of San Francisco to cancel the existing lease 
on the two lots and include them in the neighborhood parking program. In 
March, 1965 » the Lakeside Village Parking Plazas Nos. 1 and 2 were designated 
as municipal off-street parking lots and parking meter regulations were estab- 
lished for their operation. 

Neighborhood Shopping District Parking Facilities 

The basic parking program adopted by the Parking Authority on August 31 f 1961, 
for the neighborhood shopping districts of the City will be a major addition 
to parking facilities provided under this category of direct public financing 
and construction. 

The program comprises: 

21 public parking lots, and 
4 public parking garages, in 
15 neighborhood shopping districts, with 
923 parking stall total capacity, for 
$4»549»631 estimated approximate cost 

Thus far, all properties have been acquired for the Eureka Valley Parking Plaza 
No. 1 (Castro Street); West Portal Parking Plaza No. 1 (i/est Portal Avenue); 
Geary Boulevard Parking Plaza No. 1 (Geary Boulevard); Outer Irving Parking 
Plaza (20 th 'venue); Noe Valley Parking Plaza (24 th Street); Portola Parking 
Plaza No. 1 (Felton Street); Sixteen th-Hoff Parking Plaza (Mission District); 
Clement Shoppers Parking Center No. 1 (8 th Avenue) and Clement Shoppers Parking 
Center No. 2 (9 to Avenue). All of these facilities are in operation. 

Definite commitments have been received in other areas. The Authority at all 
times has done everything possible to alleviate hardship on families and owners 
of business whose properties have been required for such public use. 

Upon completion of the Neighborhood Parking Program, the number and capacity of 
parking facilities constructed under this category will be: 

Number of facilities 28 

Number of parking stalls 1,492 






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Page 7 

September 8, 1966 

Financing Time Schedule ; 

1. The Controller of the City and County of San Francisco has estimated that the 
basic program can be financed in its entirety from monies now on deposit in 
our "Off -Street Parking Fund", plus the estimated increments which will be 
realized up to July 1, 1967. These are accruing from parking meter revenues 
at the rate of approximately $525,000 a year. 

2. The Neighborhood Program, providing off-street parking facilities in these 
neighborhood districts, is as follows: 

Pro.jects approved to date: 17 





Parking 








District 


Stalls 


General Location 


Cost 


Eureka Valley 


21 


Castro Street 


$ 


80,000 


Eureka Valley 


21 


Collingwood Street 




128,600 


West Portal 


20 


West Portal Avenue 




160,200 


West Portal 


26 


Claremont-Ulloa Streets 




167,000 


Geary 


22 


Geary Boulevard 




101,150 


Geary 


38 


18^-19* Avenues 




167,550 


Outer Irving 


25 


Irving at 20 th Avenue 




111,161 


Noe Valley 


16 


24 th Street 




49,108 


Portola 


15 


Felton Street 




42,451 


Mission 


72 


Hoff -Rondel Streets 




284,963 


Mission 


20 


24 th and Capp Streets 




76,400 


Clement 


33 


8 th Avenue 




156,437 


Clement 


28 


9* Avenue 




115,962 


Marina 


85 


Pierce Street 




612,000 


North Beach 


99 


Vallejo Street 




702,249 


Excelsior 


32 


Norton-Harrington 




138,100 


Inner Irving 


40 


8 th -9 th Avenues 




226,400 




613 




$3,319,731 


Projects re-referred 


and under 


study: 2 


% 




Haight-Ashbury 


32 


Haight and Cole Streets 


160,600 


Polk 


_5£ 


Sacramento Street 




309.800 




88 




% 


470,400 


Projects requiring new site recommendations, primarily 






because of interim changes in original use: 6 


$ 




Bay View 


20 


Quesada Avenue 


14,500 


Clement 


28 


6 th Avenue 




74,500 


Outer Irving 


40 


23rd Avenue 




213,000 


Portola 


22 


San Bruno Avenue 




47,000 


Mission 


38 


18 tt and Capp Streets 




154,000 


Mission 


74 


Capp near 20 th Street 




256.500 




222 




9 


759,500 



U. 549.651 



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Page 8 

September 8, 1966 



Accomplishments to date under the foregoing program may be summarized as follows: 
Policy Point No. 1 ; (Private financing) 
l) Completed: 



a) 1965-1966 

b) 1949-1965 

c) Total 



1,861 stalls 
17,028 " 
18,889 



11) Total Under No. 1 
Policy Point No. 2 : (Public-private financing) 
l) Completed: 



a) 1965-1966 

b) 1949-1965 

c) Total 



750 stalls 
5.782 " 



6,532 



ll) Under development: 
a) 1965-1966 
111) Total Under No. 2 
Policy Point No. 3 : (Public financing) 
l) Completed: 



4,305 stalls 



a) 1965-1966 

b) 1949-1965 

c) Total 

ll) Under development: 
a) 1965-1966 
111) Total Under No. 3 
GRAND TOTAL 



252 stalls 

^6i » 



821 



671 stalls 



18,889 stalls 



10,837 stalls 



1.492 stalls 
51.218 stalls 



The actual and projected total cost of this program is approximately $55 million, 
of which, under the Parking Authority's program and policy, only about $9 million 
will have required public financing; roughly only about iGfo of the total. 



< 

CO 
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1950 



1960 



The Parking Authority, since its inception late in 1949 » has striven constantly 
to provide better parking conditions in San Francisco. 

The above chart shows the annual number of parkers served and illustrates this 
growth since 1950. In all, over 32 million parkers have been served in the 
past sixteen years. 

The Union Square Garage was constructed in 1941. With the completion of St. 
Mary's Square Garage in 1954 and the 5 tt and Mission Garage in 1958, the number 
of parkers served increased rapidly. The subsequent completion of the Civic 
Center Plaza and Sutter-Stockton Garages in I960, Portsmouth Square Garage in 
1962 and the acquisition of the Ellis-O'Farrell Garage in 1965, has helped 
sustain this growth rate. 

The completion of the Golden Gateway and Japanese Cultural Center Garages will 
add over 2,000 parking spaces to those already in existance. This will provide 
still better service to the San Francisco scene. 



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Page 13 
September 8, 1966 



PRESENT STATUS OF 1947 PARKING BOND FUND 



Original Bond Fund (authorized 1947) 
Increment from Project Rents 
Increment from sale of Air Rights - 
St. Mary's Square Garage 

Total Fund Accruals 

Appropriated to June 30, 1966 
Unappropriated balance June 30 , 1966 



$5,000,000.00 

819,025.79 

99,890.00 



$5,751,583.83 
187t??l-?6 



SS. 918. 915. 79 



£5.918.915.79 



Bonds outstanding June 30, 1966 
Bonds redeemed 1965-1966 
Bond interest paid 1965-1966 



$1,840,000.00 

400,000.00 

51,750.00 



ACKNOWLEDGMENT 

The Parking Authority wishes to express its appreciation and to acknowledge the 
cooperation and assistance of Mayor Shelley, the Chief Administrative Officer, 
members of the Board of Supervisors, the City Attorney, Controller, Director of 
Property, Director of Public Works, City Engineer, Traffic Engineer, Director of 
Planning, the private garage industry, the public-spirited citizens comprising 
the corporations sponsoring many major projects, and others who have given so 
generously of their time and contributed so greatly to the advancement of its 
program during the past year. 



Respectfully submitted, 

PARKING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY 
AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



By 



Arthur S. Becker 
Acting Director 



ASB:hj 
Encs. 



SF 



ANNUAL REPORT 

'"" 1966-1967 



DOCUMENTS 
NOV 1 5 1967 



CAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 




^WVR/CfNG AUTHORITY 
City & County of San Francisco 




PARKING AUTHORITY 

DONALD MAGNIN, Chairman 

HARRY J. ALEO 

FRANK J. GALLAGHER 

FRANCIS H. LOUIE 

DAVID THOMSON 

Staff: 
ARTHUR S. BECKER, Director 



HONORABLE JOHN F. SHELLEY, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

I. CHAIRMAN'S MESSAGE , 1 

II. PARKING AUTHORITY ORGANIZATION 2 

III. PARKING AUTHORITY BUDGET 2 

IV. PARKING AUTHORITY FUNCTIONS 2 

V. POLICY, PROGRAM AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS 3 

Policy Point No. 1 - Private Financing and 

Construction ......... 3 

Policy Point No. 2 - Public and Private Financing 

and Construction ....... 3-6 

Policy Point No. 3 - Direct Public Financing 

and Construction ....... 7-9 

Summary of Accomplishments To Date 10 

VI. COMPARATIVE STATEMENTS 11-14 

VII. PRESENT STATUS 1947 PARKING BOND FUND 15 

VIII. ACKNO\/LEDGMENTS 15 












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.... 




Honorable John F. Shelley 

Mayor, City and County of San Francisco 

200 City Hall 

San Francisco, California 94102 

Dear Mayor Shelley: 

I submit, herewith, on behalf of the Members of the Authority and its staff, 
the Annual Report of the San Francisco Parking Authority. 

In the year just ended, the Authority continued its work in the development 
of additional neighborhood parking facilities. 

Land acquisition was completed, or is in the process of being completed, for 
the following neighborhood sites: 

Eureka Yalley (Collingwood Street) 
Excelsior (Norton-Harrington Streets) 
Geary (18*^-19* Avenues) 
Inner Irving (8^-9* Avenues) 
Mission (24 th and Capp Streets) 
West Portal (Claremont-Ulloa Street) 

Most significant, the Authority has awarded the contract for its first multi- 
level neighborhood parking garage (The North Beach Garage), and the ground- 
breaking for this facility took place on October 2, 1967, with completion 
scheduled on or about October 2, 1968. 

Most of the land for the greatly needed Marina Garage has been acquired, and 
it is anticipated that the remaining parcel needed will be acquired shortly. 

During the year, the 1200-stall Golden Gateway Garage was opened, and is now 
in operation. This facility not only will serve the visitors to and occu- 
pants of the Golden Gateway development, but is also providing much needed 
parking capacity for the Financial District area. 

Of particular import are the conclusions derived from the recently completed 
Downtown Parking and Traffic Survey. The future demand for a substantial 
amount of additional parking in the downtown core area is so clearly demon- 
strated by the survey, that we can conclude that it is essential that we 
address ourselves to this problem, and the solution thereof, within the 
immediate future. 

Under the able direction of Mr. Arthur S. Becker, who has just completed his 
first full year as the Director of the Authority, the Authority was able to 
enjoy a degree of co-operation from all other City departments never before 
experienced. The Commissioners join me in extending our thanks to these 
agencies . 

On behalf of the Members and staff of the Authority, I express to you our 
profound thanks for your co-operation and support. 

To the Board of Supervisors, my thanks for their having accepted, almost 
without exception, all recommendations made by the Authority after careful, 
in-depth study, and deliberation. 

The need for parking is a continuing one, and, knowledgeable of this fact, 
the Authority will endeavor to address itself to these problems sufficiently 
in advance so that we can plan programs and implement these programs in a 
timely manner. 




tfully su ; 
Donald Magnin 





THE PARKING AUTHORITY 



MEMBERS: 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO donald magn.n 
450 McAllister street — room eo3 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 94102 



CHAIRMAN 



HARRY J. ALEC- 
FRANK J. GALLAGHER 

(415) 558-3651 francis H. LOUIE 



JOHN F. SHELLEY, MAYOR 



DAVID THOMSON 



ARTHUR S. BECKER 
DIRECTOR 



STATEMENT OP ACTIVITIES OP THE PARKING AUTHORITY 
City and County of San Francisco 
Fiscal Year ending June 50 . 1967 

The report of the Parking Authority for the fiscal year 1966-1967 » together 
with supplemental information you have requested, is herewith respectfully 
submitted. 

The financial status is set forth in attached copies of the Authority's four 
(4) quarterly reports. 

PARKING AUTHORITY ORGANIZATION 

The San Francisco Parking Authority is composed of: 

Five Members appointed for four-year terms by the Mayor 
and approved by the Board of Supervisors. 

Staff composed of three members, consisting of the Director, 
and two Secretaries. 

PARKING AUTHORITY BUDGET 
1965-1966 $47,637 

1966-1967 $49,570 

Past ten-year average $43,829 

PARKING AUTHORITY FUNCTION 

The Parking Authority functions like a department of the City and County 
government and is directly responsible to the Mayor and the Board of 
Supervisors of the City and County of San Francisco. 

In its present capacity, it is responsible for advising and making recommendations 
to the Mayor and Board of Supervisors on matters pertaining to the off-street 
parking program. Where required, the Authority also acts as an agent for the 
City and County government in carrying out off-street parking programs approved 
by the City administration. 



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Function No. 1: 



Investigative and recommendatory work 
required for the development of new 
off-street parking facilities through- 
out San Francisco. 



Function No. 2\ 



To make recommendation to the Mayor and 
Board of Supervisors regarding parking 
rates and charges and the operational 
procedures and regulations in force at 
each of the City and County off-street 
parking facilities for which it is 
responsible. 



POLICY. PROGRAM AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

The major accomplishments and activities of the Authority for the past year 
are shown below. These have been classified according to the Authority's 
policy and program adopted February 8, 1950. 



Policy Point No. 1 ; 



Policy Point No. 2 : 



Stimulation of and cooperation with private 
enterprise to finance and construct the 
facilities required under the off-street 
parking program. 

New parking facilities reported 
completed and placed in operation 
during fiscal year 1966-1967? 



These additions brought the total 
of new off-street parking spaces 
provided under this phase of the 
Authority program since October 6, 
1949, to 



2.090 stalls 



20.979 stalls 



Public cooperation with private enterprise 
to provide off-street parking by public 
provision of garage sites and private 
provision of the construction financing. 



Constructed and In Operation in this Category 

The following parking facilities have been financed and built as cooperative 
projects between the City and private business: 



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Name 

Union Square 
Garage 

Civic Center 
Auto Park 



Date Stall 

Completed Capacity 

September 11, 1,081 
1942 



December 18, 
1953 



St. Mary's Square May 12, 
Garage 1954 



Forest Hill 
Parking Plaza 



July 1, 
1957 



Ellis-O'Farrell August 5, 
Garage 1957 

Fifth and Mission August 28, 



Garage 

Civic Center 
Plaza Garage 



1958 

March 1, 
I960 



Sutter-Stockton November 19, 



Garage 



I960 



Fifth & Mission November 21, 
Garage Expansion I 1961 

Portsmouth Square August 24, 
Garage 1962 

Golden Gateway December 21, 
Garage 1966 



276 

828 

13 
900 

1,472 
840 
870 

534 

504 

1,000 
8,318 



Total 
Construction Project 
Land Cost Cost Cost 

& -o- $1,646,331 $1,646,331* 



-0- 



-0- 



-0- 



-0- 



-0- 



-0- 



31,000 



-0- 



-0- 



31,000 



417,513 2,300,000 2,717,513 



-0- 



2,800,000** 



1,690,970 2,966,697 4,657,667 



4,298,822 4,298,822 



2,665,069 3,837,177 6,502,246 



1,000,000 1,000,000 



3,181,500 3,181,500 



1,090,000 6,135,000 7,225,000 



* All debts of the Union Square Garage Corporation have been retired, and 
effective August 31, 1961, it assigned all of its interest in the Manage- 
ment and Occupancy Agreement to the City. After transferring its remaining 
assets to the City, the Union Square Garage Corporation filed a certificate 
of winding up and dissolution with the Secretary of State. A new operating 
lease was executed between the City and a private garage operator for a 
period of ten years and 9 months, commencing October 1, 1967. 

** Privately financed and operated until July 20, 1965, at which time it 
was acquired by the City, 









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Under Construction in this Category 

The following garages are under construction in this category: 

Japanese Cultural Center Underground Garage 

This project is under joint development by National-Braemar, Inc., 
the City of San Francisoo Western Addition Parking Corporation, 
the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency, and the Parking Authority, 
subject to official approval of the City. Construction began on 
November 3» 1965* Completion is estimated by December 1, 1967. 

Present estimates indicate the following physical and financial 
facts for this project: 

Location: Sub-surface of the three City-block area 

bounded by Geary, Post, Laguna and Fillmore 
Streets 

Capacity: Self parking - 800 stalls 

Attendant parking - 1,100 stalls 

Size: Two garages, one of two levels and one a 
single level 

Land cost: $256,640 

Estimated 

Construction 

Cost: $3,750,000 

Operation: Self parking; attendant parking optional 

Proposed Rate Schedule : 250 first hour 

250 each additional hour 
$1.50 maximum to 6 p.m. 
6 p.m. to Midnight - 500 first two hours 

250 each additional hour 
$1.00 maximum to midnight 
Midnight to 7 a.m. - 500 first two hours 

250 each additional hour 
$1.00 maximum to 7 a.m. 
$2.50 maximum 10-24 hours 

Fillmore Merchants 

Validation stamps: 100 each 

Books of 500 @ $50 per book 
Monthly rates - $25 to $30 

Proposed Rate Schedule : Under rates comparable to those 
(Unit B on Fillmore of the Neighborhood Parking Program. 
Street) This area will eventually become a 

section of the Neighborhood Program. 



■ '■ 






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Fifth and Mission Garage Expansion II 

This project is under joint development by the City of San 
Francisco Downtown Parking Corporation and the Parking 
Authority, subject to approval by the City. The Letter 
of Intent and Agreement for financing, acquisition and 
construction of the addition have been approved. Start 
of construction is dependent upon acquisition of the 
property by the Redevelopment Agency. 

Present estimates indicate the following physical and 
financial facts: 

Location: From present terminus on Mission Street 
to Fourth and Minna Streets 

Size: Approximately 24»000 square feet 

Additional 
parking 
stalls : 296 

Total 

parking 

stalls: 1,879 

Estimated cost of land acquisition, 
demolition and site preparation: $880,000 

Estimated construction cost: $725*000 

Contractor: Donald M. Drake Co. , Portland, Oregon 

Engineers: H. J. Degenkolb & Associates 

Operator: City of San Francisco Downtown Parking Corp. 

Management: S. E. Onorato, Inc. 

Operation: Self-parking 

Parkins Rates: 150 each hour 

$1.25 maximum (24 hours) 
$17.50 monthly 

The capacity of the foregoing off-street parking projects completed or under 
development jointly by government and private business under the Parking 
Authority program to date totals 9.714 parking stalls . 



....... . , 

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Policy Point No. 3 : Direct public financing and construction, including 

site acquisition, where private construction was not 
or could not be undertaken. 

The 8,500 special event parking stalls at Candlestick Park are considered 
a special case and are not carried as an increment of the general parking 
program. 

Constructed and In Operation in this Category 

Mission-Bartlett Parking Plaza 250 stalls 

Lakeside Village Parking Plaza * 49 stalls 

Seventh & Harrison Parking Plaza 270 stalls 

569 stalls 

* The City originally acquired the sites for these two neighborhood lots 
located at Ocean Avenue and Junipero Serra Boulevard, and Ocean Avenue 
and Nineteenth Avenue ; constructed parking lots thereon and leased them 
to the Lakeside Village Merchants' Association for a period of twenty 
years, commencing October 1, 1956. On January 28, 1965 » the Merchants' 
Association requested the City and County of San Francisco to cancel 
the existing lease on the two lots and include them in the neighborhood 
parking program. In March, 1965, the Lakeside Village Parking Plazas 
Nos, 1 and 2 were designated as municipal off-street parking lots and 
parking meter regulations were established for their operation. 

Neighborhood Shopping District Parking Fa c ilities 

The basic parking program adopted by the Parking Authority on August 31, 
1961, for the neighborhood shopping districts of the City will be a major 
addition to parking facilities provided under this category of direct 
public financing and construction. The program comprises: 

21 public parking lots, and 

4 public parking garages, in 

15 neighborhood shopping districts, with 

984 parking stall total capacity, for 

$4i 839, 013 estimated approximate cost 

Thus far, all properties have been acquired for: the Eureka Valley Parking 
Plaza No. 1 (Castro Street); Vest Portal Parking Plaza No. 1 (West Portal 
Avenue); Geary Boulevard Parking Plaza No. 1 (Geary Boulevard); Outer Irving 
Parking Plaza (20 th Avenue); Noe Valley Parking Plaza (24 tt Street); Portola 
Parking Plaza No. 1 (Felton Street); Sixteenth-Hoff Parking Plaza (Mission 
District); Clement Shoppers Parking Center No. 1 (8 tt Avenue) and Clement 
Shoppers Parking Center No. 2 (9 th Avenue). All of these facilities are in 
operation. 



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Definite commitments have been received in other areas. The Authority at 
all times has done everything possible to alleviate hardship on families 
and owners of business whose properties have been required for such public 
use. 

Upon completion of the Neighborhood Parking Program, the number and capacity 
of parking facilities constructed under this category will be: 



Number of facilities 



28 



Number of parking stalls 



1,553 



Financing Time Schedule : 



1. The Controller of the City and County of San Francisco has 
estimated that the basic program can be financed in its 
entirety from monies now on deposit in our "Off -Street 
Parking Fund", plus the estimated increments which will 

be realized up to July 1, 1967 * These are accruing from 
parking meter revenues at the rate of approximately 
$525,000 a year. 

2. The Neighborhood Program, providing off-street parking 
facilities in these neighborhood districts, is as follows: 

Projects approved and completed : £ 

District 

Eureka Valley (Castro Street) 
West Portal (West Portal Avenue) 
Geary (Geary Boulevard) 
Outer Irving (20* Avenue) 
Noe Valley (24 tt Street) 
Portola (Felton) 
Mission (16* and Hoff ) 
Clement (8 tt Avenue) 
Clement (9 to Avenue) 



Parking 




Stalls 


Cost 


21 


$ 79,769 


20 


135,490 


22 


101,133 


25 


111,161 


16 


52,629 


15 


42,451 


72 


284,096 


33 


155,827 


28 


111,053 



252 
Projects approved and awaiting construction : 2_ 



Eureka Valley (Collingwood) 
North Beach (Valleoo Street) 



21 
163 

184 



$1,073,609 



$ 148,279 
937,725 

$1,086,004 



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Projects approved and land acquisition 
in progress: 

District Stall s Cost 

Excelsior (Norton-Harrington) 
Geary (lS^-l^ Avenues) 
Inner Irving (8 tt -9 tt Avenues 
West Portal (Claremont-Ulloa) 
Mission (24 tt and Capp Streets) 
Marina (Pierce Street) 



Projects re-referred and under study : 2 

Haight-Ashbury (Haight and Cole) 
Polk (Sacramento Street) 



Projects requiring new site recommendations, 
primarily because of interim changes in 
original use: 6, 

Bay View (Quesada Avenue) 
Clement (6 th Avenue) 
Outer Irving (23rd Avenue) 
Portola (San Bruno Avenue) 
Mission (18 111 and Capp Streets) 
Mission (Capp near 20 to Street) 

222 $ 759,500 
Totals 984 U.859.015 



32 
38 
40 
26 
20 
82 


$ 138,100 
167,550 
226,400 
167,850 
76,400 
762,000 


238 
2 

32 

56 


$1,538,300 


$ 138,600 
243,000 


88 


$ 381,600 



20 


$ 14,500 


28 


74,500 


40 


213,000 


22 


47,000 


38 


154,000 


74 


256,500 



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Accomplishments to date under the foregoing program may be summarized as 
follows : 

Policy Point No. 1 : (Private financing) 

l) Completed: 

1966-1967 



a) 

b) 1949-1966 

o) Total 



2,090 stalls 
18,889 " 
20,979 " 



11) Total Under No. 1 20,979 stalls 

Policy Point No. 2 : (Public-private financing) 
l) Completed: 



a) 1966-1967 

b) 1949-1966 

c) Total 



1,000 stalls 



8,318 



1,396 stalls 



11) Under development: 
a) 1966-1967 
111) Total Under No. 2 
Policy Point No. 3 : (Public financing) 
l) Completed: 



9,714 stalls 



a) 1966-1967 

b) 1949-1966 

c) Total 

ll) Under development: 

a) 1966-1967 
111) Total Under No. 3 
GRAND TOTAL 



252 stalls 
^6i » 



821 



732 stalls 



1,553 stalls 



32,246 stalls 



The actual and projected total cost of this program is approximately $55 million, 
of which, under the Parking Authority's program and policy, only about $9 million 
will have required public financing; roughly only about 16$ of the total. 



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PRESENT STATUS OF 1947 PARKING BOND FUND 

Original Bond Fund (authorized 1947 and issued) $5,000,000.00 
Transferred to Account 252,684-. 59 

Appropriated $5,252,684.59 
Expended 5*250,458.41 

Surplus* $ 2,246.18 

Unappropriated balance June 50, 1967 $ 214,097.69 

* Account closed June 50, I960, Surplus funds transferred 
to Unappropriated Account 4990. 

Bonds outstanding June 50, 1967 $1,520,000.00 
Bonds redeemed 1966-1967 320,000.00 

Bond interest paid 1966-1967 45,257-50 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

The Parking Authority wishes to express its appreciation and to acknowledge 
the cooperation and assistance of Mayor Shelley, the Chief Administrative 
Officer, Members of the Board of Supervisors, the City Attorney, Controller, 
Director of Property, Director of Public Works, City Engineer, Traffic 
Engineer, Director of Planning, the private garage industry, the public- 
spirited citizens comprising the corporations sponsoring many major projects, 
and others who have given so generously of their time and contributed so 
greatly to the advancement of its program during the past year. 



Respectfully submitted, 

PARKING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY 
AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 




By 
Arthur S. Becker 
Director 



ASBihj 

Ends. 



15 



• - ■• 






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.- . . • : - ■ -.'■■■..•.■■•■ 



' 









ANNUAL REPORT 

7967-J968 




JAPANP 



utomobUes. 




^PARKING AUTHORITY 
City & County of San Francisco 



PARKING AUTHORITY 

DONALD MAGNIN, Chairman 

HARRY J. ALEO* 

EUGENE L. FRIEND 

FRANK J. GALLAGHER 

FRANCIS H. LOUIE 

DAVID THOMSON 

Staff: 
ARTHUR S. BECKER, Director 



HONORABLE JOSEPH L. ALIOTO, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 



'Appointment terminated April 22, 1968. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 
CHAIRMAN'S MESSAGE 

I. PARKING AUTHORITY ORGANIZATION 1 

II. PARKING AUTHORITY BUDGET 1 

III. PARKING AUTHORITY FUNCTIONS 1 

IV. POLICY, PROGRAM AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS 2 

Policy Point No. 1 - Private Financing and 

Construction 2 

Policy Point No. 2 - Public and Private Financing 

and Construction 2-4 

Policy Point No. 3 - Direct Public Financing 

and Construction ...... 5-7 

Summary of Accomplishments to Date 8 

V. COMPARATIVE STATEMENTS 9-13 

VI. PRESENT STATUS 1947 PARKING BOND FUND 14 

VII. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 14 




Honorable Joseph L. Alioto, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 
200 City Hall 
San Francisco, California 94102 

Dear Mayor Alioto: 

On behalf of the Members of the ParKing Authority and its Staff, I submit herewith 
the Annual Report of the San Francisco Parking Authority. 

During the fiscal year 1967-1968 just ended, significant progress has been made in 
the opening of neighborhood parking lots and/ or in the acquisition of land for that 
purpose. Specifically, the following sites were acquired, and completion of these 
parking facilities will be accomplished within the very near future: 

Inner Irving Parking Plaza I (8 tb -9 th Avenues) 

Mission Parking Plaza II (24 th and Capp Streets) 

Geary Boulevard Parking Plaza II (l8 tt -19 ttl Avenues) 

Bay View Parking Plaza I (Palou Avenue and Mendell Street) 

Eureka Valley Parking Plaza II (18* and Collingwood Streets) 

During the year, we acquired the property for, and commenced construction on, two 
multi-level neighborhood parking garages. The North Beach Garage is scheduled for 
completion during the early part of 1969 • Demolition has been completed on the site 
of the Marina Garage, and construction thereon is scheduled to begin in October of 
this year. 

The 850-stall garage serving the Japanese Cultural and Trade Center was opened 
December 6, 1967- Initial patronage has been below that expected, but it is antici- 
pated that revenues will increase as the Center becomes more fully occupied. 

After lengthy litigation, property extending to Fourth Street adjacent to the Fifth 
and Mission Garage was acquired and construction of 296 additional stalls thereon 
will commence in October of this year. 

Hourly, daily and monthly rates were increased at the Portsmouth Square Garage, 
Civic Center Plaza Garage, Fifth and Mission Garage and Ellis-O'Farrell Garage. 
While revenues were adequate to service the bonds for these garages, the prevailing 
rates were so reasonable that patrons parked on an all-day basis, with the result 
that the short-term shopper often found the garages filled to capacity early in the 
day. The increase in rates has discouraged the use of the garage on an all-day basis 
and the short-term parker can now most usually be accommodated. Since the higher 
charges are generating substantially more revenue than was realized in the past, the 
bonded indebtedness of the garages can be amortized at an accelerated rate. This 
will result in the City acquiring clear title to the garages within a relatively 
short period, at which time all net revenues realized therefrom can be deposited in 
the General Fund of the City. 

Other accomplishments of the Authority include the just-completed arrangement where- 
by the San Francisco Unified School District has approved the installation of a 40 
stall parking facility beneath the Redding School Playground; and after a series of 
meetings with property owners and tenants of the neighborhood, the Authority is 
about to commence a search for a suitable site to service the Union Street District. 

To the Board of Supervisors our thanks for their prompt approval of and provision of 
funds for the neighborhood sites heretofore enumerated. We further appreciate the 
support of the Board in having approved our requests for substantial rate changes in 
our major garages. 

On behalf of the Members and Staff of the Authority, I wish to extend to you, Mr. 
Mayor, our sincere appreciation for your cooperation and support. 

The magnitude of the parking demand as determined by the recently completed Downtown 
Parking and Traffic Study, and the soon-to-be-completed Northern Waterfront Study, 
is such that the Authority will endeavor to anticipate these demands sufficiently in 
advance of their occurrence so as to have available adequate facilities concurrent 
with the need therefor. 

ftfully subn 




Donald Magnin, Chai 





THE PARKING AUTHORITY 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

450 MCALLISTER STREET — ROOM 603 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 94102 

(415) 558-3651 



3SEPH L. ALIOTO. MAYOR 



MEMBERS: 

DONALD MAGNIN 
CHAIRMAN 

EUGENE L. FRIEND 
FRANK J. GALLAGHER 
FRANCIS H LOUIE 
DAVID THOMSON 



ARTHUR S. BECKER 

DIRECTOR 



STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES OF THE PARKING AUTHORITY 
City and County of San Francisco 
Fiscal Year ending June 50 , 1968 



The report of the Parking Authority for the fiscal year 1967-1968, together 
with supplemental information you have requested, is herewith respectfully 
submitted. 

The financial status is set forth in attached copies of the Authority's four 
(4) quarterly reports. 



PARKING AUTHORITY ORGANIZATION 

The San Francisco Parking Authority is composed of: 

Five Members appointed for four-year terms by the Mayor 
and approved by the Board of Supervisors. 

Staff composed of three members, consisting of the Director , 
and two Secretaries . 

PARKING AUTHORITY BUDGET 
1966-1967 $49,570 

1967-1968 $36,341 

Past ten-year average $43,346 



PARKING AUTHORITY FUNCTION 

The Parking Authority functions like a department of the City and County 
government and is directly responsible to the Mayor and the Board of 
Supervisors of the City and County of San Francisco. 

In its present capacity, it is responsible for advising and making 
recommendations to the Mayor and Board of Supervisors on matters 
pertaining to the off-street parking program. Where required, the 
Authority also acts as an agent for the City and County government in 
carrying out off-street parking programs approved by the City administration. 



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-2- 

Function No. 1 ; Investigative and recommendatory work 

required for the development of new off- 
street parking facilities throughout San 
Francisco. 

Function No. 2 : To make recommendation to the Mayor and 
Board of Supervisors regarding parking 
rates and charges and the operational 
procedures and regulations in force at 
each of the City and County off-street 
parking facilities for which it is 
responsible. 



POLICY, PROGRAM AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

The major accomplishments and activities of the Authority for the past year 
are shown below. These have been classified according to the Authority's 
policy and program adopted February 8, 1950* 

Policy Point No. I t Stimulation of and cooperation with private 

enterprise to finance and construct the 
facilities required under the off-street 
parking program. 

New parking facilities reported 

completed and placed in operation 

during fiscal year 1967-1968: 1,784 stalls 

These additions brought the total 

of new off-street parking spaces 

provided under this phase of the 

Authority program since October 6, 

1949, to 22,765 stalls 

Policy Point No. 2 t Public cooperation with private enterprise 

to provide off-street parking by public 
provision of garage sites and private 
provision of the construction financing. 

Constructed and in Operation in this Category 

The following parking facilities have been financed and built as cooperative 
projects between the City and private business: 






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Name 

Union Square 
Garage 



Date Stall 
Completed Capacity Land Cost 



Total 
Construction Project 
Cost Cost 



September 11, 1,081 
1942 



-o- $1,646,331 $1,646,331* 



Marshall Square November 1, 
Parking Plaza 1948 



111 



-0- 



-0- 



-0- 



Civic Center 

Auto Park 


December 18, 
1953 


276 


-0- 


31,000 


31,000 


St. Mary's Square May 12, 
Garage 1954 


828 


417,513 


2,300,000 


2,717,513 


Forest Hill 
Parking Plaza 


July 1, 
1957 


13 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 


Ellis-O'Farrell 
Garage 


August 5» 
1957 


900 


-0- 


-0- 


2,800,000** 


Fifth & Mission 
Garage 


August 28, 
1958 


938 


1,690,970 


2,966,697 


4,657,667 


Civic Center 
Plaza Garage 


March 1, 
I960 


840 


-0- 


4,298,822 


4,298,822 


Sutter-Stockton 
Garage 


November 19, 
I960 


870 


2,665,069 


3,837,177 


6,502,246 


Fifth & Mission 
Garage 
Expansion I 


November 21, 
1961 


534 


-0- 


1,000,000 


1,000,000 


Portsmouth Square August 24, 
Garage 1962 


504 


-0- 


3,181,500 


3,181,500 


Golden Gateway 
Garage 


December 21, 
1966 


1,000 


1,090,000 


6,135,000 


7,225,000 


Japanese Cultural 
& Trade Center 
Garage 


December 1, 
1967 


850 


256,640 


3,750,000 


4,006,640 



*A11 debts of the Union Square Garage Corporation have been retired, and 
effective August 31, 1961, it assigned all of its interest in the Manage- 
ment and Occupancy Agreement to the City. After transferring its remaining 
assets to the City, the Union Square Garage Corporation filed a certificate 
of winding up and dissolution with the Secretary of State. A new operating 
lease was executed between the City and a private garage operator for a 
period of ten years and nine months commencing October 1, 1967 . 

**Privately financed and operated until July 20, 1965, at which time it 
was acquired by the City. 















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^4- 

Under Development in this Category- 
Fifth and Mission Garage Expansion II 

This project is under joint development by the City of San 
Francisco Downtown Parking Corporation and the Parking 
Authority, subject to approval by the City. The Letter 
of Intent and Agreement for financing, acquisition and 
construction of the addi*ion have been approved. Start 
of construction is scheduled to commence October 1, 1968. 

Present estimates indicate the following physical and 
financial facts: 

Location: From present terminus on Mission Street 
to Fourth and Minna Streets 

Size: Approximately 24,000 square feet 

Additional 
parking 
stalls : 296 

Total 

parking 

stalls: 1,768 

Estimated cost of land acquisition, 

demolition and site preparation: $880,000 

Estimated construction cost: $725*000 

Contractor: Donald M. Drake Co., Portland, Oregon 

Engineers: H. J. Degenkolb & Associates 

Operator: City of San Francisco Downtown Parking Corporation 

Management: S. E. Onorato, Inc. 

Operation: Self -parking 

Parking rates: 150 for the first hour 
150 for the second hour 
200 for the third hour 
250 each hour thereafter 
$2.00 maximum for 24 hours 
$27.50 monthly 

The capacity of the foregoing off-street parking projects completed or under 
development jointly by government and private business under the Parking 
Authority program to date totals 9.041 parking stalls . 



' 



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-5- 

Policy Point No. 3 ; Direct public financing and construction, including 

site acquisition, where private construction was not 
or could not be undertaken. 

The 8,500 special event parking stalls at Candlestick Park are considered 
a special case and are not carried as an increment of the general parking 
program. 

Constructed and in Operation in this Category 

Mission-Bartlett Parking Plaza 250 stalls 

Lakeside Village Parking Plazas 49 stalls 

Seventh & Harrison Parking Plaza 270 stalls 

569 stalls 

The City originally acquired the sites for the two Lakeside Village neighborr 
hood lots located at Ocean Avenue and Junipero Serra Boulevard and Ocean 
Avenue and Nineteenth Avenue, constructed parking lots thereon and leased 
them to the Lakeside Village Merchants' Association for a period of twenty 
years, commencing October 1, 1956. On January 28, 1965 » the merchants' 
association requested the City and County of San Francisco to cancel the 
existing lease on the two lots and include them in the neighborhood parking 
program. In March, 1965, ^ e Lakeside Village Parking Plazas Nos. 1 and 2 
were designated as municipal off-street parking lots and parking meter 
regulations were established for their operation. 

Leases for the operation of the Forest Hill Parking Plaza, Marshall Square 
Parking Plaza and Seventh and Harrison Parking Plaza expired during this 
fiscal year and were renewed for additional five-year periods. 

Neighborhood Shopping District Parking Facilities 

The basic parking program adopted by the Parking Authority on August 31 > 
1961, for the neighborhood shopping districts of the City will be a major 
addition to parking facilities provided under this category of direct 
public financing and construction. The program comprises: 

21 public parking lots, and 

4 public parking garages, in 

15 neighborhood shopping districts, with 

979 parking stall total capacity, for 

$5»033»583 estimated approximate cost 

Thus far, all properties have been acquired for the Eureka Valley Parking 
Plaza No. I ( Castro Street), West Portal Parking Plaza No. I (West Portal 
Avenue), Geary Boulevard Parking Plaza No. I (Geary Boulevard), Outer Irving 
Parking Plaza (20th Avenue), Noe Valley Parking Plaza (24th Street), Portola 
Parking Plaza No. I (Felton Street), Sixteenth-Hoff Parking Plaza (Mission 
District), Clement Shoppers Parking Center No. 1 (8th Avenue), Clement 
Shoppers Parking Center No. 2 (9th Avenue), and Eureka Valley Parking 
Plaza II (18th and Collingwood Streets). All of these facilities are 
in operation. 



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Definite commitments have "been received in other areas. The Authority at 
all times has done everything possible to alleviate hardship on families 
and owners of business whose properties have been required for such public 
use. 

Upon completion of the Neighborhood Parking Program, the number and capacity 
of parking facilities constructed under this category will be: 

Number of facilities 28 

Number of parking stalls 1,278 

Financing Time Schedule : 

1. The Controller of the City and County of San Francisco has 
estimated that the basic program can be financed in its 
entirety from monies now on deposit in our "Off -Street 
Parking Fund, " plus the estimated increments which will 

be realized up to July 1, 1968. These are accruing from 
parking meter revenues at the rate of approximately $450,000 
a year. 

2. The Neighborhood Parking Program, providing off-street parking 
facilities in these neighborhood districts, is as follows: 

Projects approved and completed : 10 

District 

Eureka Valley ( Castro Street) 
Eureka Valley (Collingwood Street) 
West Portal (West Portal Avenue) 
Geary (Geary Boulevard) 
Outer Irving (20th Avenue) 
Noe Valley (24th Street) 
Portola (Felton Street) 
Mission (l6th & Hoff Streets) 
Clement (8th Avenue) 
Clement (9th Avenue) 



Pro.jects approved and awaiting construction : 6_ 

Bay View ( Palou-Mendell Streets) 
Geary (l8th-19th Avenues) 
Inner Irving (8th-9th Avenues) 
Mission (24th & Capp Streets) 
Marina (Pierce Street) 
North Beach (Vallejo Street) 
(under construction) 



Parking 




Stalls 


Cost 


21 


* 79,769 


21 


148,279 


20 


135,490 


22 


101,133 


25 


111,161 


16 


52,629 


15 


42,451 


72 


284,096 


33 


155,827 


28 


111.053 


273 


$1,221,888 


6 




15 


$ 86,000 


38 


167,550 


40 


226,400 


20 


102,500 


82 


829,000 


163 


967,695 


358 


$2,379,145 






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-7- 

Projects approved and land acquisition 
in progress: 2 

Parking 
District Stalls Cost 

Excelsior (Norton-Harrington) 32 $ 138,100 

West Portal (ciaremont-TJlloa) 26 167,850 



Pro.jects re-ref erred and under study ; 2_ 



Projects requiring new site 
recommendations, primarily because 
of interim changes in original use ; 

Clement (6th Avenue) 
Outer Irving (23rd Avenue) 
Porto la (San Bruno Avenue) 
Mission (18th and Capp Streets) 
Mission (Capp near 20th Street) 



58 $ 305,950 



Haight-Ashbury (Haight-Cole) 32 $ 138,600 

Polk (Sacramento Street) £6 243,000 



88 $ 381,600 



28 


$ 74,500 


40 


213,000 


22 


47,000 


38 


154,000 


Zi 


256,500 



202 $ 745,000 
TOTALS 222 S5.033.583 









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. 






-8- 

Accomplishments to date under the foregoing program may "be summarized as 
follows: 

Policy Point No. I t (Private financing) 

1. Completed: 



a. 


1967-1968 


1,784 stalls 


b. 


1949-1967 


20,979 » 


c. 


Total 


22,763 » 



11. Total under No. 1 22,763 stalls 

Policy Point No. 2 : (Public-private financing) 
1. Completed: 



a. 1967-1968 

b. 1949-1967 

c. Total 



850 stalls 
8,745 " 



11. Under development: 

a. 1967-1968 296 stalls 
111. Total under No. 2 
Policy Point No. 5 : (Public financing) 



9,041 stalls 



1. 


Completed: 








a. 1967-1968 

b. 1949-1967 

c. Total 


273 stalls 
569 " 
842 " 




11. 


Under development: 








a. 1967-1968 


711 stalls 




111. 


Total under No. 3 




1.553 stalls 


GRAND TOTAL 




55.357 stalls 



The actual and projected total cost of this program is approximately 
$55 million, of which, under the Parking Authority' s program and policy, 
only about $9 million will have required public financing; roughly only 
about 16$ of the total. 



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-14- 



FRBSENT STATUS OF 1947 PABKING BOND FUND 

Original Bond Fund (authorized 1947 and issued) $5,000,000.00 

Transferred to Account 232.684*59 

Appropriated $5 » 232, 684. 59 

Expended 5.230.438.41 

Surplus * $ 2,246.18 



Unappropriated balance June 30, 1968 $ 247 t 620. 28 

* Account closed June 30, I960, Surplus funds transferred 
to Unappropriated Account 4990. 

Bonds outstanding June 30, 1968 $1,200,000.00 

Bonds redeemed 1967-1968 320,000.00 

Bond interest paid 1967-1968 36,162.50 



AmnrnwT.Tm GMENTS 

The Parking Authority wishes to express its appreciation and to acknow- 
ledge the cooperation and assistance of Mayors Shelley and Alioto, the 
Chief Administrative Officer, Members of the Board of Supervisors, the 
City Attorney, Controller, Director of Property, Director of Public Works, 
City Engineer, Traffic Engineer, Director of Planning, the private garage 
industry, the public-spirited citizens comprising the corporations sponsoring 
many major projects, and others who have given so generously of their time 
and contributed so greatly to the advancement of its program during the past 
year. 



Respectfully submitted, 

PARKING AUTHORITY OP THE CITY 
AND COUNTY OP SAN FRANCISCO 




L^ 



Arthur S. Becker 
Director 
Ends. 






ANNUAL REPORT 



4? 



1968-1969 







VALLEJO STREET GARAGE — CENTRAL POLICE STATION 




PARKING AUTHORITY 

. // 
City & County of San Francisco 



PARKING AUTHORITY 



DONALD MAGNIN, Chairman 

EUGENE L. FRIEND 

FRANK J. GALLAGHER 

FRANCIS H. LOUIE 

JAMES A. SILVA 

DAVID THOMSON* 

Staff: 
ARTHUR S. BECKER, Director 



HONORABLE JOSEPH L. ALIOTO, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 



Appointment terminated March 11, 1969. 



TABL E OF CONTENTS 

Page 
CHAIRMAN'S MESSAGE 

I. PARKING AUTHORITY ORGANIZATION 1 

II. PARKING AUTHORITY BUDGET 1 

III. PARKING AUTHORITY FUNCTIONS 1 

IV. POLICY, PROGRAM AND ACCOMPLISHMENT'S 2 

Policy Point No. 1 - Private Financing and 

Construction . 2 

Policy Point No. 2 - Public and Private Financing 

and Construction 2-4 

Policy Point No. 3 - Direct Public Financing 

and Construction . 5-7 

Summary of Accomplishments to Date 8 

V. COMPARATIVE STATEMENTS 9-13 

VI. PRESENT STATUS 1947 PARKING BOND FUND 14 

VII. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 14 




Honorable Joseph L. Alio to, Mayor 

City and County of San Francisco f 

200 City Hall 

San Francisco, California 94102 



Dear Mayor Alio to: 



-^ V 



On behalf of the Members of the Parking Authority and its Staff, I herewith submit 
the Report of the San Francisco Parking Authority for the fiscal year 1968-1969. 

During the subject year, the Inner Irving Parking Plaza and the Twenty-fourth and 
Capp Parking Plaza (Mission District) were completed and opened for use of the 
short-term parker. A total of 55 spaces was made available as a result of the 
opening of these lots. 

During the remainder of the 1969 calendar year, the Excelsior Parking Plaza and 
Geary Boulevard Parking Plaza No. 2, with a total of 66 parking spaces, will 
become operative. 

Of particular importance is the fact that necessary legislation was enacted in 
order to permit utilization of revenues from the soon-to-be-completed Vallejo 
Street Garage (North Beach) for the Off -Street Parking Program. Since it is 
estimated that the garage will generate net income in the amount of $63,000 
annually, the Authority now has an important source of additional revenue with 
which to pursue its program. 

For the first time, the Authority departed from its prior program of building 
surface facilities in neighborhood areas and commenced construction of two 
parking structures — one a two-level parking facility to serve the Marina 
District, and the other a one-level structure beneath the playground of the 
Redding School to serve the Southern Polk Street area. Both of these facilities 
will be available in time to alleviate the high parking demand which will occur 
during the forthcoming Christmas season. The two herein-described facilities 
will add 122 parking spaces to the Off -Street Parking Program. 

Notwithstanding an increase in the actual number of parking meters in service, 
revenue realized therefrom and available to the Authority has consistently 
diminished over the past few years. While a portion of the dimunition has 
resulted from vandalism and abandonment of meters during the BARTD construction 
period, the bulk of the decrease can be attributed to a lower level of meter 
enforcement. The reduced level of enforcement was, in turn, a product of the 
need for utilization of police personnel in areas commanding a higher priority. 
Thus, the Authority is most indebted to you, Mr." Mayor, and to the Board of 
Supervisors for having approved the request of the Police Department for 29 
additional traffic controlmen. 

Still to be resolved is the critical need for parking facilities to serve the 
Union Street, Northern Waterfront, and Northern Polk Street areas. 

In view of the increasing use of certain facilities on a long-term basis, rate 
revisions were made in certain garages in order to discourage the use of these 
facilities for long-term parking. Specifically, rates were increased at the 
Golden Gateway Garage and the Sutter-Stockton Garage, and the desired result 
has been accomplished. 

While the revenues of the Japanese Cultural and Trade Center Garages have been 
substantially below those anticipated for the project, we were successful in 
adding greatly to these revenues by renting the excess capacity spaces for 
monthly storage purposes. 

During the year, the last remaining Member of the original Board of the Parking 
Authority, David Thomson, completed his term and was succeeded by James A. Silva, 
who was appointed to a term expiring in October, 1972. 




Donald Magnin 
Chairman 




THE PARKING AUTHORITY 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

450 MCALLISTER STREET — ROOM 603 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 94102 

(415) 558-3651 



)SEPH L. ALIOTO, MAYOR 



MEMBERS: 

DONALD MAGNIN 

CHAIRMAN 

EUGENE L. FRIEND 
FRANK J. GALLAGHER 
FRANCIS H. LOUIE 
JAMES A. SILVA 



ARTHUR S. BECKER 

DIRECTOR 



STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES OF THE PARKING AUTHORITY 

City and County of San Francisco 
Fiscal year ending June 50. 1969 



The report of the Parking Authority for the fiscal year 1968-1969, 
together with supplemental information you have requested, is herewith 
respectfully submitted. 

The financial status is set forth in attached copies of the Authority's 
four (4) Quarterly Reports. 



PARKING AUTHORITY ORGANIZATION 

The San Francisco Parking Authority is composed of: 

Five Members appointed for four-year terms by the Mayor 
and approved by the Board of Supervisors. 

Staff composed of three members, consisting of the Director , 
and two Secretaries. 



PARKING AUTHORITY BUDGET 
1967-1968 $36,341 

1968-1969 $39,267 

Past ten-year average $43,006 



PARKING AUTHORITY FUNCTION 

The Parking Authority functions like a department of the City and County 
government and is directly responsible to the Mayor and the Board of 
Supervisors of the City and County of San Francisco. 

In its present capacity, it is responsible for advising and making 
recommendations to the Mayor and Board of Supervisors on matters 
pertaining to the off-street parking program. Where required, the 
Authority also acts as an agent for the City and County government 
in carrying out off-street parking programs approved by the City 
administration. 



- 






' . 






' ' ' ' ■ ■ ■ ■ • .• 



' 



• ■ 






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■ 






' ■ 









■ 



. - :.v 



■ ■ 



■ 



■ 



u 

■ 



. 



■ . 






-2- 



Punction No. 1: 



Investigative and recommendatory work 
required for the development of new off- 
street parking facilities throughout 
San Francisco. 



Function No. 2: 



To make recommendation to the Mayor and 
Board of Supervisors regarding parking 
rates and charges and the operational 
procedures and regulations in force at 
each of the City and County off-street 
parking facilities for which it is 
responsible. 



POLICY. PROGRAM AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

The major accomplishments and activities of the Authority for the past 
year are shown below. These have been classified according to the 
Authority's policy and program adopted February 8 t 1950. 



Policy Point No. 1 ; 



Policy Point No. 2 : 



Stimulation of and cooperation with private 
enterprise to finance and construct the 
facilities required under the off-street 
parking program. 

New parking facilities reported 
completed and placed in operation 
during fiscal year 1968-1969: 

These additions brought the total 
of new off-street parking spaces 
provided under this phase of the 
Authority program since October 6, 
1949, to 

Public cooperation with private enterprise 
to provide off-street parking by public 
provision of garage sites and private 
provision of the construction financing. 



466 stalls 



25.229 stalls 



Constructed and in Operation in this Category 

The following parking facilities have been financed and built as 
cooperative projects between the City and private business: 



-3- 

Total 
Date Stall Construction Project 

Name Completed Capacity Land Cost Cost Cost 

Union Square September 11, 1,081 $ -0- $1,646,331 $1,646,331* 
Garage 1942 

Marshall Square November 1, 111 -0- -0- -0- 
Parking Plaza 1948 

Civic Center December 18, 276 -0- 31, COO 31,000 
Auto Park 1953 

St. Mary's Sq. May 12, 828 417,513 2,300,000 2,717,513 

Garage 1954 

Forest Hill July 1, 13 -0- -0- -0- 

Parking Plaza 1957 

Ellis-O'Farrell August 5, 900 -0- -0- 2,800,000** 
Garage 1957 

Fifth & Mission August 28, 938 1,690,970 2,966,697 4,657,667 
Garage 1958 

Civic Center March 1, 84O -0- 4,298,822 4,298,822 
Plaza Garage i960 

Sutter-Stockton November 19, 870 2,665,069 3,837,177 6,502,246 
Garage i960 

Fifth & Mission November 21, 534 -0- 1,000,000 1,000,000 
Garage 1961 

Expansion I 

Portsmouth Sq. August 24, 504 -0- 3,181,500 3,181,500 
Garage 1962 

Golden Gateway December 21, 1,000 1,090,000 6,135,000 7,225,000 
Garage 1966 

Japanese Cultural February 16, 850 256,640 3,750,000 4,006,640 

& Trade Center 1968 

Garages 

*A11 debts of the Union Square Garage Corporation have been retired, and 
effective August 31, 1961, it assigned all of its interest in the Manage- 
ment and Occupancy Agreement to the City. After transferring its remaining 
assets to the City, the Union Square Garage Corporation filed a certificate 
of winding up and dissolution with the Secretary of State. A new operating 
lease was executed between the City and a private garage operator for a 
period of ten years and nine months commencing October 1, 1967. 

**Privately financed and operated until July 20, 1965, at which time it 
was acquired by the City. 



-4- 



Under Development in this Category 

Fifth and Mission Garage Expansion II 

This project was developed jointly by the City of San Francisco 
Downtown Parking Corporation and the Parking Authority, subject 
to approval by the City. Construction began February 10, 1969 
and will be in full use by November 10, 1969 to accommodate the 
Christmas holiday shoppers. 

Present estimates indicate the following physical and financial 
facts : 



Location: 



Size: 

Additional 
parking 
stalls : 

Total parking 
stalls : 



Cost of land 
acquisition, 
demolition and 
site preparation: 



From present terminus on Mission Street 
to Fourth and Minna Streets 

Approximately 24,000 square feet 

320 

1,792 

$258,100 



$1,188,700 

Owen W. Haskell, Inc., San Leandro, California 

H. J. Degenkolb & Associates 

City of Fan Francisco Downtown Parking 
Corporation 

S. E. Onorato Incorporated 

Self -parking 

150 for the first hour 
150 for the second hour 
200 for the third hour 
250 each hour thereafter 
$2.00 maximum for 24 hours 
$27.50 monthly 

The capacity of the foregoing off-street parking projects completed or under 
development jointly by government and private business under the Parking 
Authority program to date totals 9.065 parking stalls . 



Construction 
cost: 

Contractor: 

Engineers: 

Operator: 

Management: 
Operation: 
Parking rates; 



-5- 

jfrlicy Point No. 3 s Direct public financing and construction, including 

site acquisition, where private construction was not 
or could not be undertaken. 

The 8,500 special event parking stalls at Candlestick Park are considered 
a special case and are not carried as an increment of the general parking 
program. 

Constructed and in Operation in this Category 

Mission-Bartlett Parking Plaza 250 stalls 

Lakeside Village Parking Plazas 49 stalls 

Seventh & Harrison Parking Plaza 270 stalls 

569 stalls 

The City originally acquired the sites for the two Lakeside Village 
neighborhood lots located at Ocean Avenue and Junipero Perra Boulevard 
and Ocean Avenue and Nineteenth Avenue, constructed parking lots thereon 
and leased them to the Lakeside Village Merchants' Association for a 
period of twenty years, commencing October 1, 1956. On January 28, 1965 , 
the merchants' association requested the City and County of San Francisco 
to cancel the existing lease on the two lots and include them in the 
neighborhood parking program. In March, 1965 » the Lakeside Village 
Parking Plazas Nos. 1 and 2 were designated as municipal off-street 
parking lots and parking meter regulations were established for their 
operation. 

The Parking Authority is working with the Housing Authority and the City 
of San Francisco Mission-Bartlett Garage (a non-profit corporation) to 
finance and construct a 500-car garage on the site of the existing Mission- 
Bartlett Parking Plaza, with utilization of air space above the garage by 
the Housing Authority for construction of a 110-unit Senior Citizens' 
Housing Project. 

Neighborhood Shopping District Parking Facilities 

The basic parking program adopted by the Parking Authority on August 31 » 
1961, for the neighborhood shopping districts of the City will be a major 
addition to parking facilities provided under this category of direct 
public financing and construction. The program comprises: 

22 public parking lots, and 

4 public parking garages, in 

15 neighborhood shopping districts, with 

1,008 parking stall total capacity, for 

$5 » 330,040 estimated approximate cost 

Thus far, all properties have been acquired and construction completed for 
the Eureka Valley Parking Plaza No. 1 (Castro Street), West Portal Parking 
Plaza No. 1 (West Portal Avenue), Geary Boulevard Parking Plaza No. 1 
(Geary Boulevard), Outer Irving Parking Plaza (20th Avenue), Noe Valley 
Parking Plaza (24th Street), Portola Parking Plaza No. 1 (Felton Street), 
Sixteenth-Hoff Parking Plaza (Mission District), Clement Shoppers Parking 
Center No. 1 (8th Avenue), Clement Shoppers Parking Center No. 2 (9th 



-6- 

Avenue), Eureka Valley Parking Plaza No. 2 (l8th-Collingwood Streets), 
Inner Irving Parking Plaza (8th-9th Avenues), and Twenty-fourth and Capp 
Parking Plaza (Mission District). All of these facilities are in operation. 

The Vallejo Street Garage (North Beach) is the first facility in the 
Neighborhood Off -Street Parking Program to be leased for operation by a 
professional operator. Bids were awarded to Savoy Auto Parks and Garages, 
Inc. as the highest responsible bidder at 63.69$ of the gross revenues. 
Legislation amending Section 213 of the San Francisco Traffic Code was 
approved by the Parking Authority, and subsequently by the Board of 
Supervisors, to provide for crediting the Off -Street Parking Fund with 
receipts from the net revenues of this -leased City-owned off-street 
parking facility. 

Definite commitments have been received in other areas. The Authority at all 
times has done everything possible to alleviate hardship on families and 
owners of business whose properties have been required for such public use. 

Upon completion of the Neighborhood Parking Program, the number and capacity 
of parking facilities constructed under this category will be: 

Number of facilities 29 

Number of parking stalls 1,307 

Financing Time Schedule : 

1, The Controller of the City and County of San Francisco has 
estimated that the basic program can be financed in its 
entirety from monies now on deposit in our "Off -Street 
Parking Fund," plus the estimated increments which will be 
realized up to July 1, 1969. These are accruing from parking 
meter revenues at the rate of approximately $250,000 a year. 

2. The Neighborhood Parking Program, providing off-street parking 
facilities in these neighborhood districts, is as follows: 

Projects approved and completed : 12 

District 

Eureka Valley (Castro Street) 
Eureka Valley (Collingwood Street) 
West Portal (West Portal Avenue) 
Geary (Geary Boulevard) 
Outer Irving (20th Avenue) 
Noe Valley (24th Street) 
Portola (Felton Street) 
Mission (l6th & Hoff Streets) 
Clement (8th Avenue) 
Clement (9th Avenue) 
Inner Irving (8th-9th Avenues) 
Mission (24th & Capp Streets) 



Parking Stalls 


Cost 


21 


$ 79,769 


21 


143,644 


20 


135,490 


22 


101,133 


25 


111,017 


16 


53,948 


15 


42,451 


72 


284,096 


33 


153,255 


28 


108,441 


36 


209,819 


JLi 


90.088 


328 


$1,513,151 



-7- 

Pro.jects approved and awaiting construction ; \ 

District Parking Stalls Cost 

Bay View ( Palou-Mendell Streets) 15 % 86,000 
Excelsior (Norton-Harrington) 30 138,100 

Geary (I8th-19th Avenues) ^6 167,550 

81 % 391,650 

Projects approved and under construction ; \ 

Marina Garage (Pierce Street) 
North Beach Garage (Vallejo Street) 
Polk District Garage (Redding School) 



Projects approved and land acquisition 
in progress; 

Vest Portal (Claremont-Ulloa) 

Projects re-referred and under study ; 

Haight-Ashbury (Haight-Cole) 
Polk (Sacramento Street) 



Projects requiring new site 

recommendations, primarily because 

of interim changes in original use ; £. 

Clement (6th Avenue) 
Outer Irving (23rd Avenue) 
Porto la (San Bruno Avenue) 
Mission (18 th & Capp Streets) 
Mission (Capp near 20th Street) 



82 
163 
JO 


% 871,094 
967,695 
255.000 


285 


$2,093,789 


1 




24 


% 204,850 


32 

5£ 


% 138,600 

245,000 


88 


$ 381,600 



28 


% 74,500 


40 


213,000 


22 


47,000 


38 


154,000 


Jk 


256,500 



202 % 745,000 
1,008 >5. 530,040 



-8- 

Accomplishments to date under the foregoing program may be summarized as 
follows : 

Policy Point No* 1 ; (Private financing) 

1, Completed 



a. 


1968-1969 


466 stalls 


b. 


1949-1968 


22,763 - 


c. 


Total 


23,229 " 



11. Total under No. 1 23,229 stalls 

Policy Point No. 2 ; (Public-private financing) 
1 . Completed 

a. 1968-1969 -0- stalls 

b. 1949-1968 8,745 " 

c. Total 8,745 " 

11. Under development 

a. 1968-1969 320 stalls 
111. Total under No. 2 9,065 stalls 

Policy Point No. 5 ; (Public financing) 
1. Completed 





a. 1968-1969 

b. 1949-1968 

c. Total 


55 stalls 
842 " 
897 


11. 


Under development 






a. 1968-1969 


680 stalls 


111. 


Total under No. 3 




GRAND 


TOTAL 





1,577 stalls 

35.871 stalls 

The actual and projected total cost of this program is approximately 
$55 million, of which, under the Parking Authority's program and policy, 
only about $9 million will have required public financing; roughly only 
about 16$ of the total. 



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-14- 



PRESENT STATUS OF 1947 PARKING BOND FUND 

Original Bond Fund (authorized 1947 and issued) 

Transferred to Account 

Appropriated 

Expended 

Surplus * 



$5 » 000, 000. 00 

2?2|684.?9 

$5,232,684.59 

5,2?0 t 4?8.41 

$ 2,246.18 



Unappropriated balance June 30, 1969 

* Account closed June 30, I960, Surplus funds transferred 
to Unappropriated Account No. 1990. 



$ 277,668.11 



Bonds outstanding June 30, 1969 
Bonds redeemed 1968-1969 
Bond interest paid 1968-1969 



$ 885,000.00 

315,000.00 

28,625.00 



The Parking Authority wishes to express its appreciation and to acknow- 
ledge the cooperation and assistance of Mayor Joseph L. Alioto; the 
Chief Administrative Officer 1 Members of the Board of Supervisors; 
the City Attorney? Controller; Director of Property; Director of 
Public Works; City Engineer; Traffic Engineer; Director of Planning; 
the private garage industry; the public-spirited citizens comprising 
the corporations sponsoring many major projects, and others who have 
given so generously of their time and contributed so greatly to the 
advancement of its program during the past year. 



Respectfully submitted, 

PARKING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY 
AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 




S&z^^ 



Arthur S. Becker 
Director 



Ends. 



llXL-t- 









ANNUAL REPORT 

1969-1970 



DOCUMENTS 

OCT 15 1970 



SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC 'tBRARV 





PARKING AUTHORITY 
City & County of San Francisco 



PARKING AUTHORITY 



DONALD MAGNIN, Chairman 

EUGENE L. FRIEND 

FRANK J. GALLAGHER* 

FRANCIS H. LOUIE 

ACHILLE H. MUSCHI 

JAMES A. SILVA 



Staff: 
ARTHUR S. BECKER, Director 



HONORABLE JOSEPH L. ALIOTO, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 



♦Appointment expired October 26, 1969. 



TABLE OF CO NTENTS 

Page 
CHAIRMAN'S MESSAGE 

I. PARKING AUTHORITY ORGANIZATION 1 

II. PARKING AUTHORITY BUDGET 1 

III. PARKING AUTHORITY FUNCTIONS 1 

IV. POLICY, PROGRAM AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS 2 

Policy Point No. 1 - Private Financing and 

Construction 2 

Policy Point No. 2 - Public and Private Financing 

and Construction 2-4 

Policy Point No. 3 - Direct Public Financing 

and Construction . 4-6 

Summary of Accomplishments to Date 7 

V. COMPARATIVE STATEMENTS 8-13 

VI. PRESENT STATUS 1947 PARKING BOND FUND 14 

VII. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 14 




Honorable Joseph L. Alio to, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 
200 City Hall 
San Francisco, California 94102 

Dear Mayor Alioto: 

On behalf of the Members of the Parking Authority and its Staff, I submit 
herewith the report of the San Francisco Parking Authority for the fiscal 
year 1969-1970. 

A milestone in the history of the Authority was realized with the opening 
of the first neighborhood parking garages. The Marina Garage opened in 
December of 1969 and has a capacity of 82 spaces; the North Beach Garage 
opened in that same month and accommodates 163 automobiles. The latter 
facility, because of its adjacency to the night-time demand generated by 
North Beach entertainment establishments, operates during evening hours 
with a rate structure significantly higher than that used during the day. 
Substantial revenues will be developed by this facility, and they will be 
credited to the Off -Street Parking Fund. 

The dual use of valuable City-owned land was undertaken for the first 
time by the Authority when it constructed a 40-space lot beneath the 
Redding School Playground in the Polk Street neighborhood. By agreement 
with the Board of Education, the Authority replaced the school playground 
with a surface far superior to that previously enjoyed. 

In addition to the foregoing, surface lots were completed and made 
operational in the following districts: 

Excelsior District (Norton-Harrington Streets), 30 spaces 

Geary Boulevard District (l8th-19th Avenues), 36 spaces 

Under construction and scheduled for opening before the end of 1970 are lots 
in the: 

Bay View District (Palou-Mendell Streets), 15 spaces 

West Portal District (Claremont-Ulloa Streets), 24 spaces 

Downtown municipal garages kept pace with the increasing parking demand when 
the Fifth and Mission Garage completed a 316-stall expansion, and the City of 
San Francisco Uptown Parking Corporation has filed a Letter of Intent with the 
Parking Authority and the Board of Supervisors in which it details its plans 
for a 500-stall expansion of the Sutter-Stockton Garage. The Authority is 
presently holding hearings relative to this proposal. 

The effect of a higher level of parking meter enforcement was clearly seen 
when meter revenues, during the first six months of 1970, increased by 
approximately 10^. This favorable trend reverses a long-term downward 
experience, and the Authority reiterates its thanks to you, Mr. Mayor, for 
having obtained the necessary increase in traffic controlmen. 

During the year Mr. Francis H. Louie was re-appointed to a 4-year term 
expiring October 26, 1973 • Mr. Achille H. Muschi was appointed to a 4-year 
term expiring on that same date. He succeeded Mr. Frank J. Gallagher. 



RedMctfully 

cLaJL 

Donald Magnin 
Chairman 





THE PARKING AUTHORITY 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

450 MCALLISTER STREET — ROOM 603 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 94102 

(415) 558-3651 



DSEPH L. ALIOTO, MAYOR 



MEMBERS: 

DONALD MAGNIN 

CHAIRMAN 

EUGENE L. FRIEND 
FRANCIS H. LOUIE 
ACHILLE H. MUSCHI 
JAMES A. SILVA 



ARTHUR S. BECKER 

DIRECTOR 



STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES OP THE PARKING AUTHORITY 

City and County of San Francisco 
Fiscal year ending June 30 . 1970 



The report of the Parking Authority for the fiscal year 1969-1970, 
together with supplemental information you have requested, is herewith 
respectfully submitted. 

The financial status is set forth in attached copies of the Authority's 
four (4) Quarterly Reports. 



PARKING AUTHORITY ORGANIZATION 

The San Francisco Parking Authority is composed of: 

Five Members appointed for four-year terms by the Mayor 
and approved by the Board of Supervisors. 

Staff composed of three members, consisting of the Director, 
and two Secretaries. 



PARKING AUTHORITY BUDGET 
1968-1969 $39,267 

1969-1970 $40,856 

Past ten-year average $42,866 



PARKING AUTHORITY FUNCTION 

The Parking Authority functions like a department of the City and County 
government and is directly responsible to the Mayor and the Board of 
Supervisors of the City and County of San Francisco. 

In its present capacity, it is responsible for advising and making 
recommendations to the Mayor and Board of Supervisors on matters 
pertaining to the off-street parking program. Where required, the 
Authority also acts as an agent for the City and County government 
in carrying out off-street parking programs approved by the City 
admini s tration . 



' 



. 















, 



-2- 



Function No. 1j 



Function No. 2: 



Investigative and recommendatory work 
required for the development of new off- 
street parking facilities throughout 
San Francisco. 

To make recommendation to the Mayor and 
Board of Supervisors regarding parking 
rates and charges and the operational 
procedures and regulations in force at 
each of the City and County off-street 
parking facilities for which it is 
responsible. 



POLICY. PROGRAM AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

The major accomplishments and activities of the Authority for the past 
year are shown below. These have been classified according to the 
Authority's policy and program adopted February 8, 1950. 



Policy Point No. I t 



Stimulation of and cooperation with private 
enterprise to finance and construct the 
facilities required under the off-street 
parking program. 

New parking facilities reported 
completed and placed in operation 
during fiscal year 1969-1970: 



These additions brought the total 
of new off-street parking spaces 
provided under this phase of the 
Authority program since October 6, 
1949, to 



593 stalls 



25.822 stalls 



Policy Point No. 2 ; 



Public cooperation with private enterprise 
to provide off-street parking by public 
provision of garage sites and private 
provision of the construction financing. 



Constructed and in Operation in this Category 

The following parking facilities have been financed and built as 
cooperative projects between the City and private business: 



Name 

Union Square 
Garage 

Marshall Square 
Parking Plaza 



Date Stall 
Completed Capacity Land Cost 



September 11, 1,081 
1942 



November 1, 
1948 



111 



-0- 



-0- 



Total 
Construction Project 
Cost Cost 

$1,646,331 $1,646,331* 
-0- -0- 



-3- 



Name 


Date 

Completed 

December 18, 
1953 


Stall 
Capacity 

276 


Land Cost 
-0- 


Construction 
Cost 


Total 
Project 
Cost 


Civic Center 
Auto Park 


$ 31,000 


$ 31,000 


St. Mary's Sq. 
Garage 


May 12, 
1954 


828 


S 417,513 


2,300,000 


2,717,513 


Forest Hill 
Parking Plaza 


July 1, 
1957 


13 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 


Ellis-O'Farrell 
Garage 


August 5t 
1957 


900 


-0- 


-0- 


2,800,000** 


Fifth & Mission 
Garage 


August 28, 
1958 


938 


1,690,970 


2,966,697 


4,657,667 


Civic Center 
Plaza Garage 


March 1, 
I960 


840 


-0- 


4,298,822 


4,298.822 


Sutter-Stockton 
Garage 


November 19, 
I960 


870 


2,665,069 


3,837,177 


6,502,246 


Fifth & Mission 
Garage 
Expansion I 


November 21, 
1961 


534 


-0- 


1,000,000 


1,000,000 


Portsmouth Sq. 
Garage 


August 24, 
1962 


504 


-0- 


3,181,500 

? 


3,181,500 


Golden Gateway 
Garage 


December 21, 
1966 


1,000 


1,090,000 


6,135,000 


7,225,000 


Japanese Cultural 
Center Garage 


February 16, 
1968 


850 


256,640 


3,750,000 


4,006,640 


Fifth & Mission 


February 6, 


316 


258,100 


1,188,700 


1,446,800 



Garage 1970 

Expansion II 

*A11 debts of the Union Square Garage Corporation have been retired, and 
effective August 31, 1961, it assigned all of its interest in the Management 
and Occupancy Agreement to the City. After transferring its remaining assets 
to the City, the Union Square Garage Corporation filed a certificate of winding 
up and dissolution with the Secretary of State. A new operating lease was 
executed between the City and a private garage operator for a period of ten 
years and nine months commencing October 1, 1967* 

**Privately financed and operated until July 20, 1965, at which t:Lme it was 
acquired by the City. 






























. 






• 






- 



• 






- 



• • 



• 



. 



' 



, 









■ 



■ 






• 



. . 



■ 



-4- 

Under Development in this Category 

Sutter-Stockton Garage Expansion I 

This project is being developed jointly by the City of San 
Francisco Uptown Parking Corporation and the Parking Authority, 
subject to approval by the City. 

A Letter of Intent has been received from the City of San 
Francisco Uptown Parking Corporation to finance and construct 
the expansion of the present garage by approximately 500 
additional stalls. This is proposed to be accomplished by 
using the land presently occupied by the City's Department of 
Social Services at the southeast corner of Bush and Stockton 
Streets and relocating this department to more modern offices 
located at 1680 Mission and 150 Otis Streets. 

The capacity of the foregoing off-street parking projects completed or 
under development jointly by government and private business under the 
Parking Authority program to date totals 9i56l parking stalls . 

Policy Point No. 5 : Direct public financing and construction, including 

site acquisition, where private construction was not 
or could not be undertaken. 

The 8,500 special event parking stalls at Candlestick Park are considered 
a special case and are not carried as an increment of the general parking 
program. 

Constructed and in Operation in this Category 

Mission-Bartlett Parking Plaza 250 stalls 

Lakeside Village Parking Plazas 1 & 2 49 stalls 
Seventh & Harrison Parking Plaza 270 stalls 

569 stalls 

Mission-Bartlett Parking Plaza — Senior Citizens' Housing 

The Parking Authority recommended against the proposal of the 
Housing Authority and the City of San Francisco Mission- 
Bartlett Garage (a non-profit corporation) to finance and 
construct a 500-car garage on the site of the existing 
Mission-Bartlett Parking Plaza. However, the Parking 
Authority did recommend in favor of utilization of air 
space above the garage by the Housing Authority for 
construction of a 110-unit Senior Citizens' Housing 
Project. 






J. 






. 



■ ■ - 

s 



- - .■ '- ; - 

■ ' - ■ ' ■ - ' " 



■ ■ ' '• ■ 



. . 






-5- 



Neighborhood Shopping District Parking Facilities 

The basic parking program adopted by the Parking Authority on August 31 » 
1961 for the neighborhood shopping districts of the City will be a major 
addition to parking facilities provided under this category of direct 
public financing and construction. The program comprises: 

22 public parking lots, and 

4 public parking garages, in 

15 neighborhood shopping districts, with 

1,008 parking stall total capacity, for 

$5»332,040 estimated approximate cost 

The Vallejo Street Garage (North Beach) is the first facility in the 
Neighborhood Off -Street Parking Program to be leased for operation by a 
professional operator. Bids were awarded to Savoy Auto Parks and Garages, 
Inc. as the highest responsible bidder at 63.69% of the gross revenues. 
Legislation amending Section 213 of the San Francisco Traffic Code was 
approved by the Parking Authority, and subsequently by the Board of 
Supervisors, to provide for crediting the Off -Street Parking Fund with 
receipts from the net revenues of this leased City-owned off-street parking 
facility. 

In the Union Street neighborhood district, the Parking Authority designated 
a site to accommodate 53 automobiles at a cost of $473 » 600 at the corner of 
Fillmore and Filbert Streets. This project was referred to the Board of 
Supervisors by the Streets and Transportation Committee without recommenda- 
tion. The matter was referred back to Committee by the Board and by 
Committee referral back to the Parking Authority for further study and 
investigation. 

Upon completion of the neighborhood parking program, the number and capacity 
of parking facilities constructed under this category will be: 

Number of facilities 31 

Number of parking stalls It 630 

Financing Time Schedule : 

1. The Controller of the City and County of San Francisco 
has estimated that the basic program can be financed in 
its entirety from moneys now on deposit in our "Off -Street 
Parking Fund, " plus the estimated increments which will be 
realized up to July 1, 1970. These are accruing from 
parking meter revenues at the rate of approximately 
$200,000 a year. 



-6- 



2. The Neighborhood Parking Program, providing off-street 
parking facilities in these neighborhood districts, is 
as follows: 



Projects approved and in operation ; 17 



District 

Eureka Valley (Castro Street) 
Eureka Valley (Collingwood Street) 
West Portal (West Portal Avenue) 
Geary (Geary Boulevard) 
Outer Irving (20th Avenue) 
Noe Valley (24th Street) 
Portola (Pelton Street) 
Mission (l6th & Hoff Streets) 
Clement (8th Avenue) 
Clement (9th Avenue) 
Inner Irving (8th-9th Avenues) 
Mission (24th & Capp Streets) 
Excelsior (Norton-Harrington Streets) 
Geary (I8th-19th Avenues) 
Marina Garage (Pierce Street) 
North Beach Garage (Vallejo Street) 
Pclk District Garage (Redding School) 



Parking 
Stalls 

21 
21 
20 
22 

25 
16 

15 
72 

33 

28 
36 
19 
30 
36 
82 
163 

679 



Projects approved and awaiting construction ; £ 



Bay View (Palou-Mendell Streets) 
West Portal (Claremont-Ulloa Streets) 



15 
39 



Projects re-referred and under study ; \ 

Haight-Ashbury (Haight-Cole Streets) 32 
Polk (Sacramento Street) 56 

Union Street (Fillmore-Filbert Streets) 53 

141 

Projects requiring new site 

recommendations, primarily because 

of interim changes in original use ; ]5 

Clement (6th Avenue) 
Outer Irving (23rd Avenue) 
Portola (San Bruno Avenue) 
Mission (18th & Capp Streets) 
Mission (Capp near 20th Street) 




Cost 

% 79,769 
143,644 
135,490 
101,133 
111,017 
53,948 
42,451 
284,096 

153,255 
108,441 
209,819 
90,088 
138,100 
167,550 
871,094 
967,695 
255,000 
$3,912,590 



92,000 
200,850 
292,850 



138,600 
243,000 
475,600 
855,200 



$ 74,500 

213,000 

47,000 

154,000 

256,500 

% 745,000 

S5. 805, 640 



-7- 



Accomplishments to date under the foregoing program may be summarized 
as follows: 

Policy Point No. 1 ; (Private financing) 

1 . Completed 



a. 1969-1970 

b. 1949-1969 

c. Total 

11. Total under No. 1 



593 stalls 
23,229 » 

23,822 " 



23,822 stalls 



Policy Point No. 2 : (Public-private financing) 
1. Completed 



a. 1969-1970 

b. 1949-1969 

c. Total 



316 stalls 
9,061 " 



11. Under development 

a. 1969-1970 500 stalls 
111. Total under No. 2 
Policy Point No. 3 : (Public financing) 



9,561 stalls 



1. 


Completed 








a. 1969-1970 

b. 1949-1969 

c. Total 


351 stalls 
897 " 
1,248 •• 




11. 


Under development 








a. 1969-1970 


382 stalls 




111. 


Total under No. 3 




1,630 stalls 


GRAND 


TOTAL 




35.013 stalls 



The actual and projected total cost of this program is approximately 
$55 million, of which, under the Parking Authority's program and policy, 
only about $9 million will have required public financing; roughly only 
about l6fo of the total. 



. 



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-14- 



PRESENT STATUS OF 1947 PARKING BOND FU ND 

Original Bond Fund (authorized 1947 and issued) $5,000,000.00 

Transferred to Account 252^684.59 

Appropriated $ 5 , 2 32 , 684 . 59 

Expended 5.230,458.41 

Surplus * $ 2,246.18 

Unappropriated balance June 30, 1970 $ 321,697.13 

* Account closed June 30, I960, Surplus funds transferred 
to Unappropriated Account No. 1990. 

Bonds outstanding June 30, 1970 $ 570,000.00 

Bonds redeemed 1969-1970 315,000.00 

Bond interest paid 1969-1970 21,212.50 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

The Parking Authority wishes to express its appreciation and to acknowledge 
the cooperation and assistance of Mayor Joseph L. Alioto; the Chief 
Administrative Officer; Members of the Board of Supervisors; the City 
Attorney; Controller; Director of Property; Director of Public Works; 
City Engineer; Traffic Engineer; Director of Planning; the private 
garage industry; the public -spirited citizens comprising the 
corporations sponsoring many major projects, and others who have 
given so generously of their time and contributed so greatly to the 
advancement of its program during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 



PARKING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY 
AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



Arthur S. Becker 
Director 



ENCS. 



ANNUAL REPORT 

1970-1971 



DOCUMENTS 

NOV 16 1971 



PAN FRANCISCO 
|U^H<- HBRARY 




POLK DISTRICT NEIGHBORHOOD GARAGE - REDDING SCHOOL PLAYGROUND 




PARKING AUTHORITY 
City & County of San Francisco 



PARKING AUTHORITY 



DONALD MAGNIN, Chairman 

EUGENE L. FRIEND* 

FRANCIS H. LOUIE 

ACHILLE H. MUSCHI 

JAMES A. SILVAf 

MICHAEL J. McFADDEN, M.D. 

SERGIO J. SCARPA 

Staff: 
ARTHUR S. BECKER, Director 



HONORABLE JOSEPH L. ALIOTO, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 



♦Appointed to Recreation and Park Commission September 28, 1970. 
(•Appointed to Redevelopment Agency April 2, 1971. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 
CHAIRMAN'S MESSAGE 

I. PARKING AUTHORITY ORGANIZATION 1 

II. PARKING AUTHORITY BUDGET 1 

III. PARKING AUTHORITY FUNCTIONS 1 

IV. POLICY, PROGRAM AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS 2 

Policy Point No. 1 - Private Financing and 

Construction . 2 

Policy Point No. 2 - Public and Private Financing 

and Construction ....... 2-5 

Policy Point No. 5 - Direct Public Financing 

and Construction 5~8 

Summary of Accomplishments to Date 8-9 

V. PRESENT STATUS OF 1947 PARKING BOND FUND 9 

VI. COMPARATIVE STATEMENTS 10-14 

VII. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 15 




Honorable Joseph L. Alioto, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 
200 City Hall 
San Francisco, California 94102 

Dear Mayor Alioto: 

On behalf of the Members of the Parking Authority and. its Staff, I submit 
herewith the report of the San Francisco Parking Authority for the fiscal 
year 1970-1971. 

During the year, two neighborhood parking facilities were completed and 
opened to use: 

Bay View District (Palou-Mendell Streets), 15 spaces 

West Portal District (Claremont-Ulloa Streets), 24 spaces 

The inclusion of the afore-mentioned lots in the Neighborhood Off -Street 
Parking Program brings to 21 the number of facilities now operational and 
to 759 the number of spaces available to the parking public. 

In an attempt to satisfy the parking demand now existing at the westerly 
end of the Union Street shopping area, the Authority recommended the 
construction of a lot at the southeast corner of Filbert and Fill more 
Streets. The Board of Supervisors referred the matter back to the 
Authority, and we await the results of a re-survey of the area by the 
City Traffic Engineer. 

Other areas of activity include: 

The installation of bicycle racks in the Civic Center Plaza 
Garage, and the provision therein of specific spaces for 
the parking of motorcycles. 

Approval of the offer of the City of San Francisco Uptown 
Parking Corporation to construct an additional 500 stalls 
at the Sutter-Stockton Garage. 

The monitoring of the effect of the 25% San Francisco 
Municipal Parking Tax on public and private garage 
revenues. The Authority has been charged with the 
responsibility for reporting periodically on this matter 
to the Board of Supervisors. 

With few exceptions, the pressing needs of the neighborhood areas have 
now been satisfied, and it is, I think, appropriate that we again direct 
our attention to the downtown "core" area. With this in mind, the Staff 
of the Authority has met with the various City traffic agencies and with 
the Traffic Committee of the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce in order 
to develop a program which would provide turnover parking spaces to 
supplement those now serving the "core" area. Only those measures which 
are compatible with the planning, ecological and traffic requirements of 
the City are being considered. Formal public hearings will be held on 
the subject within the near future. 

The Authority wishes to dedicate this report to the memory of Deputy City 
Attorney Roland J. Henning who died in November of 1970. Mr. Henning, in 
his capacity as Legal Counsel to the Authority, served with great 
distinction during the period of 1963 to 1970. 

Resnlfctfully sv 



submit 



Donald Magnin 
Chairman 





JOSEPH L. ALIOTO, MAYOR 



THE PARKING AUTHORITY 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

450 McAllister street - room 603 
san francisco, california 94102 

(415) 558-3651 



STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES OF THE PARKING AUTHORITY 
City and County of San Francisco 
Fiscal year ending June 50. 1971 



The report of the Parking Authority for the fiscal year 1970-1971 » 
together with supplemental information, is herewith respectfully 
submitted. 

The financial status is set forth in attached copies of the Authority's 
four (4) Quarterly Reports. 



PARKING AUTHORITY ORGANIZATION 

The San Francisco Parking Authority is composed of: 

Five Members appointed for four-year terms by the Mayor 
and approved by the Board of Supervisors. 

Staff composed of three members, consisting of the Director , 
and two Secretaries . 

PARKING AUTHORITY BUDGET 
1969-1970 $40,856 

1970-1971 $43,242 

Past ten-year average $42,907 



MEMBERS: 
DONALD MAGNIN 

CHAIRMAN 

FRANCIS H. LOUIE 
MICHAEL J. McFADDEN, M.D. 
ACHILLE H. MUSCHI 
SERGIO J. SCARPA 



ARTHUR S. BECKER 

DIRECTOR 



PARKING AUTHORITY FUNCTION 

The Parking Authority functions like a department of the City and County 
government and is directly responsible to the Mayor and the Board of 
Supervisors of the City and County of San Francisco. 

In its present capacity, it is responsible for advising and making 
recommendations to the Mayor and Board of Supervisors on matters 
pertaining to the off-street parking program. Where required, the 
Authority also acts as an agent for the City and County government 
in carrying out off-street parking programs approved by the City 
administration. 



" ! . 



- -■ • 



• '. ■' :.. : :: •- ,... :;.;: tf&it :■/.:!■;. - « ■■■■■* ■■■ 



•. ' •• ;■. - it v. ■-.•-' ■ ',..'.-■ . . ■- ■ - .■-.. 



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rp . ' ■■ ■ •■ • ■■• . '• 



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.... ■:-. i ••'■■■. : ■ ' : : . .. -a:. ; -' f 



-2- 



Function No. 1: 



Investigative and recommendatory work 
required for the development of new off- 
street parking facilities throughout 
San Francisco. 



Function No. 2: 



To make recommendation to the Mayor and 
Board of Supervisors regarding parking 
rates and charges and the operational 
procedures and regulations in force at 
each of the City and County off-street 
parking facilities for which it is 
responsible. 



POLICY. PROGRAM AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

The major accomplishments and activities of the Authority for the past 
year are shown below. These have been classified according to the 
Authority's policy and program adopted February 8, 1950* 



Policy Point No. 1 ; 



Policy Point No. 2 : 



Stimulation of and cooperation with private 
enterprise to finance and construct the 
facilities required under the off-street 
parking program. 

New parking facilities reported 
completed and placed in operation 
during fiscal year 1970-1971: 

These additions brought the total 
of new off-street parking spaces 
provided under this phase of the 
Authority program since October 6, 
1949, to 

Public cooperation with private enterprise 
to provide off-street parking by public 
provision of garage sites and private 
provision of the construction financing. 



1.148 stalls 



24.970 stalls 



Constructed and in Operation in this Category 

The following parking facilities have been financed and built as 
cooperative projects between the City and private business: 



Name 

Union Square 
Garage 

Marshall Square 
Parking Plaza 



Date Stall 

Completed Capacity Land Cost 

September 11, 1,081 $ -0- 
1942 



Total 
Construction Project 
Cost Cost 

$1,646,331 $1,646,331* 



November 1, 
1948 



111 



-0- 



-0- 



-0- 



-3- 



Name 

Civic Center 
Auto Park 

St. Mary '3 Sq. 
Garage 

Forest Hill 
Parking Plaza 



Garage 



Garage 

Civic Center 
Plaza Garage 



Garage 



Portsmouth Sq. 
Garage 

Golden Gateway- 
Garage 



Date Stall 
Completed Capacity Land Cost 



December 18, 
1953 

May 12, 
1954 

July 1, 
1957 



Ellis-O'Farrell August 5, 



1957 



Fifth & Mission August 28, 



1958 

March 1, 
I960 



Sutter-Stockton November 19 1 



I960 



Fifth & Mission November 21, 
Garage 1961 

Expansion I 



August 24, 
1962 

December 21, 
1966 



Japanese Cultural February 16, 

Center Garage 1968 

Fifth & Mission February 6, 

Garage 19 70 
Expansion II 



276 



504 



316 



-0- 



828 $ 417,513 

13 -0- 

900 -0- 

938 1,690,970 

840 -0- 

870 2,665,069 

534 -0- 



-0- 



1,000 1,090,000 
850 256,640 



258,100 



Total 
Construction Project 
Cost Cost 

$ 31,000 $ 31,000 
2,300,000 2,717,513 



-0- 



-0- 



-0- 



2,800,000** 

2,966,697 4,657,667 

4,298,822 4,298,822 

3,837,177 6,502,246 

1,000,000 1,000,000 

3,181,500 3,181,500 

6,135,000 7,225,000 

3,750,000 4,006,640 

1,188,700 1,446,800 






*A11 debts of the Union Square Garage Corporation have been retired, and 
effective August 31, 1961, it assigned all of its interest in the Management 
and Occupancy Agreement to the City. After transferring its remaining assets 
to the City, the Union Square Garage Corporation filed a certificate of winding 
up and dissolution with the Secretary of State. A new operating lease was 
executed between the City and a private garage operator for a period of ten 
years and nine months commencing October 1, 1967* 

**Privately financed and operated until July 20, 1965, at which time it was 
acquired by the City. 



-4- 

Under Development in this Category 

Sutter-Stockton Garage Expansion 

This project is being developed jointly by the City of San Francisco 
Uptown Parking Corporation and the Parking Authority, subject to 
approval by the City. 

A Letter of Intent has been received from the Corporation to finance 
and construct the expansion of the present garage by approximately 
500 additional stalls. This is to be accomplished by using the 
land presently occupied by the City's Department of Social Services 
at the southeast corner of Bush and Stockton Streets and relocating 
this department to more modern offices at 1680 Mission and 150 Otis 
Streets • 

The proposal has been approved by the Capital Improvement Advisory 
Committee. Hearings are being scheduled by the appropriate 
committees of the Board of Supervisors. 

Present estimates indicate the following physical and financial 
facts : 

Location: 585 Bush Street, at the southeast corner of 
Stockton and Bush Streets. 

Size: Approximately 200,000 square feet 

Additional parking stalls: 500 

Total parking stalls: 1,370 

Estimated cost of land acquisition: SI, 000, 000 

Estimated construction cost: $4,100,000 

Architects: Lackey, Sokoloff , Hamilton & Blewett 

Engineers: H. J. Degenkolb & Associates 

Operator: City of San Francisco Uptown Parking Corporation 

Management: System Auto Parks & Garages, Inc. 

Operation: Self -parking 

Parking rates: 250 each hour for first 3 hours 
350 each additional hour 
$3.00 maximum for 24 hours 
$37.50 monthly 

Evening rates: 750 (6 PM-2:30 AM) 

Overnight (6 PM-10 AM) $1.00 
Sunday: 6 AM-6 PM) 150 first hour 

150 each addl. hour 

500 maximum 



-5- 



Yerba Buena Garages 

Following a formal presentation by the Redevelopment Agency to 
the Parking Authority, hearings will be scheduled on the two 
Central Blocks parking garages - 2,000-stall capacity each, 
at an approximate cost of $24 million. 

Fiscal Developments in this Category 

Civic Center Plaza Garage 

At the request of the Board of Supervisors, the Parking Authority 
conducted hearings on the possibility of installing bicycle racks 
in City-owned garages and levying an appropriate charge for their 
use; also the possibility of allocating space for motorbikes and 
motorcycles with an appropriate rate to be charged. 

Legislation was approved for installation of bicycle racks in 
this facility with a flat fee of 200 to be charged; and use of 
a specified area for motorbikes and motorcycles at a rate of 
250 hourly, 450 maximum for 24 hours and $7*00 monthly. 

San Francisco Municipal Parking Tax 

Legislation imposing a tax of 25$ on the parking of motor vehicles 
in off-street parking facilities became effective October 1, 1970. 
A comparison of San Francisco's municipal garages for the nine 
months' period from October, 1970 through June, 1971 shows a 
decrease in automobiles parked of 8,856, and a decrease in 
income of $144,924.69. The Parking Authority is continuing a 
close surveillance on this measure and its effect on the parking 
industry. 

The capacity of the foregoing off-street parking projects completed or under 
development jointly by government and private business under the Parking 
Authority program to date totals 9»56l parking stalls . 

Policy Point No. 5 t Direct public financing and construction, including 

site acquisition, where private construction was not 
or could not be undertaken. 

The 8,500 special event parking stalls at Candlestick Park are considered 
a special case and are not carried as an increment of the general parking 
program. 

Constructed and in Operation in this Category 

Mission-Bartlett Parking Plaza 250 stalls 

♦Lakeside Village Parking Plazas I and II 49 stalls 

Seventh and Harrison Parking Plaza 270 stalls 

569 stalls 



-6- 



*The City originally acquired the sites for the two Lakeside 
Village neighborhood lots located at Ocean Avenue and Junipero 
Serra Boulevard and Ocean and Nineteenth Avenues, constructed 
parking lots thereon and leased them to the Lakeside Village 
Merchants 1 Association for a period of twenty years, commencing 
October 1, 1956. On January 28, 1965, the merchants' association 
requested the City and County of San Francisco to cancel the 
existing lease on the two lots and include them in the Neighbor- 
hood Off -Street Parking Program. In March, 1965, the Lakeside 
Village Parking Plazas I and II were designated as municipal 
off-street parking lots and parking meter regulations were 
established for their operation. 

Neighborhood Shopping District Parking Facilities 

The basic parking program adopted by the Parking Authority on August 31, 
1961 for the neighborhood shopping districts of the City will be a major 
addition to parking facilities provided under this category of direct 
public financing and construction. The program comprises: 

25 public parking lots, and 

4 public parking garages, in 

17 neighborhood shopping districts, with 

1,102 parking stall total capacity, for 

#5,843,375 estimated approximate cost 

The Vallejo Street Garage was officially opened December 15, 1971 a&d- I s 
the first facility in the Neighborhood Off -Street Parking Program to be 
leased for operation by a professional operator - Savoy Auto Parks and 
Garages, Inc. - at a monthly rental of 63.69% of the gross revenues. 
Legislation amending the parking rates to include monthly parking was 
approved May 14, 1971. 

In the Union Street neighborhood district, the Parking Authority designated 
a site to accommodate 53 automobiles at a cost of $473,600 at the corner of 
Fillmore and Filbert Streets. This project was referred to the Board of 
Supervisors by the Streets and Transportation Committee without recommenda- 
tion. The matter was referred back to Committee by the Board and by 
Committee referral back to the Parking Authority for further study and 
investigation. A re-survey of this area by the City Engineer was requested 
and his report is expected momentarily. 

Upon completion of the neighborhood parking program, the number and capacity 
of parking facilities constructed under this category will be* 

Number of facilities 31 

Number of parking stalls 1,616 



-7- 



Financing Time Schedule 



1. The Controller of the City and County of San Francisco 
has estimated that the basic program can be financed 
in its entirety from moneys now on deposit in our "Off- 
Street Parking Fund," plus the estimated increments 
which will be realized up to July 1, 1971 • These are 
accruing from parking meter revenues at the rate of 
approximately $400,000 a year. 

2. The Neighborhood Parking Program, providing off-street 
parking facilities in these neighborhood districts, is 
as follows: 



Pro.jects approved and in operation : 21 

District 

Eureka Valley (Castro Street) 

Eureka Valley (Collingwood Street) 

West Portal (West Portal Avenue) 

West Portal (Claremont-Ulloa Streets) 

Geary (Geary Boulevard) 

Geary (l8th-19th Avenues) 

Inner Irving (8th-9th Avenues) 

Outer Irving (20th Avenue) 

Noe Valley (24th Street) 

Porto la (Felton Street) 

Mission (16th and Hoff Streets) 

Mission (24th and Capp Streets) 

Clement (8th Avenue) 

Clement (9th Avenue) 
♦Lakeside ( Junipero Serra and Ocean Avenue) 
♦Lakeside (19th and Ocean Avenues) 

North Beach (Vallejo Street) 

Marina (Pierce Street) 

Polk (Redding School) 

Excelsior (Norton-Harrington Streets) 

Bayview (Palou-Mendell Streets) 



Parking 




Stalls 


Cost 


21 


$ 79,773 


21 


143,838 


20 


135,490 


24 


201,022 


22 


101,133 


36 


164,486 


36 


208,392 


25 


111,017 


16 


53,948 


15 


42,451 


72 


284,096 


19 


91,956 


33 


153,255 


28 


108,441 


) 20) 
21) 


42,035 


163 


967,695 


82 


871,094 


40 


260,000 


30 


131,225 


J£ 


91.828 



759 



-,243,175 



Pro.jects re-referred and under study : \ 

Haight-Ashbury (Haight-Cole Streets) 

Polk (Sacramento Street) 

Union (Fillmore -Filbert Streets) 



32 
56 

141 



$ 138,600 
243,000 

475.600 
$ 855,200 



♦Transferred to Neighborhood Off -Street Parking Program 
March, 1965. 



-8- 



Projects requiring hew site 

recommendations, primarily because 

of interim changes in original use : £ 

Parking 
District Stalls Cost 



Clement (6th Avenue) 
Outer Irving (23rd Avenue) 
Porto la (San Bruno Avenue) 
Mission (18th and Capp Streets) 
Mission (Capp near 20th Street) 



28 


* 74,500 


40 


213,000 


22 


47,000 


38 


154,000 


JL 


256,500 


202 


$ 745,000 


1.102 


S5.843.375 



Accomplishments to date under the foregoing program may be summarized 
as follows: 

Policy Point No. 1 : (Private financing) 
1 • Completed 

a. 1970-1971 1,148 stalls 

b. 1949-1970 23.822 " 

c. Total 24,970 w 

11. Total under No. 1 24,970 stalls 

Policy Point No. 2 : (Public -private financing) 
1 . Completed 

a. 1970-1971 -0- stalls 

b. 1949-1970 9.061 " 

c. Total 9,061 ■ 

11. Under development 

a. 1970-1971 500 stalls 
111. Total under No. 2 9,561 stalls 

Policy Point No. 3 : (Public financing) 
1 . Completed 

a. 1970-1971 39 stalls 

b. 1949-1970 1.248 " 

c. Total 1,287 " 



-9- 

11. Under development 

a. 1970-1971 343 stalls 

111. Total under No. 3 1,630 stalls 

GRAND TOTAL 36.161 stalls 

The actual and projected total cost of this program is approximately 
$55 million, of which, under the Parking Authority's program and policy, 

only about $9 million will have required public financing; roughly only 
about 16% of the total. 

PRESENT STATUS OF 1947 PARKING BOND FUND 

Original Bond Fund (authorized 1947 and issued) $5,000,000.00 

Transferred to Account 232,684.59 

Appropriated $5,232,684.59 

Expended 5. 230 I 438. 41 

Surplus * $ 2,246.18 



Unappropriated balance June 30, 19 71 I 344,318.52 

* Account closed June 30, i960, Surplus funds transferred 
to Unappropriated Account No. 1990. 

Bonds outstanding June 30, 1971 $ 260,000.00 

Bonds redeemed 1970-1971 $ 310,000.00 

Bond interest paid 1970-1971 $ 13,800.00 





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-15- 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

The Parking Authority wishes to express its appreciation and acknowledge 
the cooperation and assistance of Mayor Joseph L. Alioto; the Chief 
Administrative Officer; Members of the Board of Supervisors; the City 
Attorney; Controller; Director of Property; Director of Public Works; 
City Engineer; Traffic Engineer; Director of Planning; the private 
garage industry; the public-spirited citizens comprising the 
corporations sponsoring many major projects, the others who have 
given so generously of their time and contributed so greatly to the 
advancement of its program during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

PARKING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY 
AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



dt/£L,S.2fezJ^ 



Arthur S. Becker 
Director 



Encs.